Friday, May 31, 2013

Thursday, May 30, 2013

May 30, 2013: Water Everywhere!


A bicyclist rides through the lake water that now covers the trail at the fishing pier.  The water is up about 6 inches even without significant rain in the last 24 hours. 5/30/13 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, May 29, 2013

May 29, 2013: Lakes Beginning to Overflow

The water in the lakes have risen above the rock riprap and are heading for the parking lot on the north shore of the north lake. The fishing pier is almost a fishing island as you can see the water has reached the bottom of the decking. In the foreground a blackbird does its best dive into the new swimming area. 5/29/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 28, 2013: Bird Interpretive Walk, Thursday, 5/30

Group takes off on one of Wolf's 2012 AHHP bird interpretive talks. (Kevin Kane)

Weather-permitting, I will lead another bird interpretive walk this Thursday evening (30th) at 5:30pm. We will meet at the small parking lot located near the intersection of Harrison Rd and Stone Brooke Rd (SW corner of the Park). We'll make our way to the bluff area to search for any lingering warblers and vireos. This area can be quite productive at times, while other days almost nothing is found. So, no guarantees.

Wolf. Oesterreich







May 27, 2013: Snapping Turtle


Common Snapping Turtle. 5/28/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This Common Snapping Turtle was found along the main lakes trail, between the bridge spur and the mini-shelter along the west sided of the north lake. Snappers will travel overland to reach new habitat or to lay eggs. They are omnivores (vegetation & animal matter) and are able to hunt down anything they can get into their mouth.

Monday, May 27, 2013

May 26, 2013: Snow Goose


This lone Snow Goose was found next to the spillway last Sunday (19th) morning.  [The latest Story County Spring record was set on 31 May 1999.]  It headed northward later that morning. 5/19/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 25, 2013: North Wetlands


This composite photograph shows the north wetlands area after the rains on the 25th, as viewed from the NW corner of the Park, along the Upland Trail. 5/25/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, May 25, 2013

May 24, 2013: “Kids Fishing and Outdoor Day,” Saturday, 5/25


“Kids Fishing and Outdoor Day” will be from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Saturday, May 25, at Ada Hayden Heritage Park. The event is sponsored by JAX Outdoor Gear, Hy-Vee Stores of Ames, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources and Pheasants Forever of Story County.

Registration is free for those age 15 and younger at the north shelter house throughout the event. All registered participants are eligible to enter a raffle, and there will be a free lunch. Freewill donations will be accepted, with all proceeds going to the Boys and Girls Club of Ames.

JAX will also provide wax worms for bait. Anglers are encouraged to bring their own rods and tackle, but loaners will be available. Besides fishing, participants can try a BB gun shoot, disc golf, a soccer goal shoot, yard games and a casting contest.

For more information, call JAX Outdoor Gear at (515) 292-2276

Thursday, May 23, 2013

May 23, 2013: Rainbow over the Inuksuk

A view of the Inuksuk, bridge, and rainbow as storm clouds passed through the Ames area on Monday (20th) evening. (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 22, 2013: Semipalmated Sandpiper




This Semipalmated Sandpiper was found in the company of 7 Least Sandpipers at Pond J. Note the black legs and the straight bill. Least Sandpipers have yellow legs and a slightly decurved bill. The Semipalmateds are generally grayer, while the Least are browner. 5/15/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, May 21, 2013

May 21, 2013: Sneak Peek


Two fawns. 5/20/13 (Todd Burras)

I received this mysterious email from Todd Burras late last evening:
I might have another photo from you, if what I have on my phone from tonight turned out reasonably well. I'll try sending it tonight or tomorrow.
I thought it might be a storm picture but it was much more exciting.  The photo above turned into the next blog entry for Todd's blog in the Ames Tribune.  If you haven't seen it yet, you can find it here.

Monday, May 20, 2013

May 20, 2013: Storm over AHHP


Thunderstorm and rainbow just south and east of Ada Hayden Park this evening. 5/20/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 19, 2013: Wetland Friends


A Canada Goose and a Blue Heron hang out in the southwest wetland complex. 5/13/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 18, 2013: Tree Swallow

This female Tree Swallow was found on the Upland Trail, just west of Jensen Pond, picking at insects amongst the gravel.  Note the band on her right leg.  She is probably part of the ISU study that has been conducted for several years.  The nesting boxes found below the Upland trail (northwest corner) are part of the study.  The males have a more metallic blue color to the upper parts. 5/15/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, May 18, 2013

May 17, 2013: Pool F


Pool F and the highlands to the north and northwest, as viewed from the main trail. 5/15/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 16, 2013: Flight of the Red-wings


The Red-winged Blackbirds are easy to spot right now on any walk through the park.  These three were photographed near wetland H in the southwest part of the park.  5/13/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 15, 2013: Least Sandpiper

A Least Sandpiper has been present along the east shore of Pond J since Saturday (11th).  This small (6") sandpiper has yellow legs (barely noticeable in the shadows) and a slightly down-curved bill.  With all the recent precipitation shorebird habitat has been lacking. 5/14/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, May 16, 2013

May 14, 2013: Redheads


Pair of Redheads on a wetland on the west side of Ada Hayden Heritage Park. 5/13/13 (Todd Burras) 

Tuesday, May 14, 2013

May 13, 2013: Beautiful Weather

The nice weather brought people out to the park in droves Monday evening as everything continues to green-up quickly.  This is a view of walkers on the isthmus between the south lake and the southwestern wetlands looking northeast. 5/13/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 12, 2013: Red-necked Grebe

This Red-necked Grebe was first observed on Friday (10th) and has been present through at least Monday.  That was a 4-grebe day (including Pied-billed, Horned, & Eared).  The Red-necked is larger (20") than the other three species (12.5-13.5") and is the more rarer.  It was observed on the south lake's west bay.  (On Monday it was south of the bridge, bouncing around in the waves. 5/13/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, May 13, 2013

Saturday, May 11, 2013

May 10, 2013: Erv's Field Notes #57


Virginia Rail. 5/6/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday afternoon, May 10, 2013. Sunny, moderate westerly breeze, Temperature 58 degrees F.

The Story County Soil and Water District distributes trees every year in honor of Arbor Day to fourth grade students in Story County. This year the District selected Bush Cranberry. We had a couple of dozen left over. Today, with the help of Ames Park staff, we added 25 Bush Cranberry to the total of 700 trees in the wildlife habitat plot on the north side. Many of the seedlings we planted last week are beginning to leaf out. This area will take some management in the coming weeks to reduce competition from thick brome grass and the re-sprouting of Siberian elm.

I have been getting reports of large fish splashing around in shallow water near shore of the main lake. Park visitors were congregated today along the north shore watching the sight. I joined the group and determined the fishes were Common Carp, Cyprinus carpio. Others have seen carp jumping up and over the concrete weirs that separate the constructed wetlands from the lake. Everyone wants to know what is going on. Well, its spring and the fish are spawning. Because of the steep banks and deep water of this old gravel pit, the shallow water in the main lake is restricted to a narrow band along the shore. Moreover, the water level is high, nearly covering the large rocky rip rap that lines the shore. The Common Carp is one of the most destructive invasive fishes we have in the Midwest. The species is indigenous to the Danube River system in Europe and was purposely introduced to the Midwest in 1880 as a game fish. They have been introduced all over the world and in some areas they are raised in aquaculture facilities. Once they get into a river system, they reproduce rapidly and spread throughout. Carp were present in the Hayden Park lake before the City obtained ownership. In 2010, the Skunk River overflowed into the park and probably brought more carp into the lake.

Carp are destructive because they are bottom feeders and when they become abundant in shallow wetlands they stir up the sediment releasing phosphorus into the water column and preventing the growth of beneficial emergent vegetation. Later in the summer the suspended phosphorus can cause extensive algal blooms. They are more of a problem in the shallow wetlands than they are in the main lake because the lake has a gravel bottom and relatively little shallow areas.

On the other hand, this is a good time to catch carp on a hook and line and they can put up quite a fight. Today, I saw a young man using light tackle land a large carp on the fishing dock. The fish probably weighed at least 10 pounds are more. He gave the fish to an elderly man who took it home to eat.

There has been a sudden jump in the number of neo-tropical migrant birds in Ames. Over the last two days I have seen the following species in my back yard: Swainson’s Thrush, Baltimore Oriole, Catbird, Redstart, Ovenbird, Rose-breasted Grosbeak, Eastern Towhee, Chipping Sparrow, White-crowned Sparrow, White-throated Sparrow, and Lincoln’s Sparrow.

Erv Klaas

Friday, May 10, 2013

May 9, 2013: Say's Phoebe




This Say's Phoebe was found today (9th) in the prairie area below the Upland Trail (where the Tree Swallow nesting boxes are located). This western species is accidental for Iowa and represents #263 for my Park List (and also my first Iowa record). [One had been seen at the IOU Spring Meeting in Cedar Falls last weekend.] It flies and feeds similarly to our Eastern Phoebe (2 were present in the same area). 5/9/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, May 9, 2013

May 8, 2013: Virginia Rail


Only the 2nd Virigina Rail that I have seen at the Park was found at Pond J on the 6th.  For most of the time it stayed hidden among last year's cattail stalks.  Note the long, slightly decurved reddish bill and gray face.  Two Soras were also in the same area and they have stubbier, yellow bills.  American Coots made it a 3-rail day! 5/6/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 7, 2013: Canada Goose

Better think again.  That nest box is too small for you! 5/3/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 6, 2012: Water Levels Up


Recent snow melt and rain have water levels at the lake high again and flowing over the dam as can be seen by the now submegerged peninsula in the southwest corner of the south lake.  5/5/13 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, May 7, 2013

May 5, 2013: Yellow-rumped Warbler


Yellow-rumped Warblers are present throughout the Park. This one was found feeding along Pond J's edge. The cold temperatures and snow have made it a bit harder to find insects to feed on. This male is of the "Myrtle" race (white throat). The "Audubon's" race (yellow throat) is more commonly found out west. 5/3/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)
 

May 4, 2013: Wolf's April 2013 Species List


This Willet (a shorebird) was found along the shore of the north lake (NE corner) on Monday (March 29th). The coloration is rather drab, but once in flight, the black-and-white pattern is quite distinctive. 3/29/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)


A total of 122 avian species was recorded this month, ranking this month as the highest April among 16 years of records. Two species, Golden Eagle (#261) and Swainson’s Hawk (#262), were added to my Park List. So far, a total of 137 species have been recorded this year.
Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the 250+ Pied-billed Grebes sighted on the 22nd may set a new peak count record for Story County (former record of 97 set on 6 Apr 2011 at Ada Hayden HP). The single Osprey on the 2nd may set a new extreme early Spring record (former record set on 5 Apr 2006 at Ada Hayden HP). Other potential new extreme early Spring records include 1♀ Wilson’s Phalarope on the 12th (former record set on 22 Apr 1984 at Colo Ponds), 1♂ Yellow Warbler on the 29th (former record set on 30 Apr 1986 at Ames, 1988 at Hendrickson Marsh, & 2001 at my backyard), and 2 Lark Sparrows on the 21st (former record set on 30 Apr 2005 at Ada Hayden HP). Rare migrants in Story County include the Swainson’s Hawk and Marbled Godwits. The Golden Eagle is an accidental record.
Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard). The order follows the 53rd Supplement (2012) to the American Ornithologists’ UnionCheck-list of North American Birds and the 12th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).
AVIAN
SNOW GOOSE: 1 (1w), 4 (~80), 6, 9, (~40), 16 (1w)
CANADA GOOSE: 1-30
WOOD DUCK: 1 (6), 10 (2♂ + 2♀), 12 (3♂ + 2♀), 14 (1♂ + 1♀), 15 (7♂ + 3♀), 16 (1♂), 18 (2♂),
21 (1♀), 23 (2), 24 (5), 25, 28, 30
GADWALL: 1 (20♂ + 20♀), 2, 3 (12+), 4 (20+), 5 (2♂ + 1♀), 6-7, 8 (3♂), 9-17, 19-20 (2♂), 21-22,
23 (12+), 24-27, 29 (5♂ + 2♀), 30 (3♂ + 2♀)
AMERICAN WIGEON: 1 (2♂ + 2♀), 14 (5♂ + 1♀), 15 (3♂ + 1♀), 16 (4♂), 22 (1♂ + 1♀), 25, 26 (1♂)
MALLARD: 1-16, 18-30
BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1 (1♂ + 1♀), 2 (2♂), 4 (2♂ + 1♀), 5 (2♂), 6-7. 8 (5♂ + 2♀), 9-30
NORTHERN SHOVELER: 1 (50+), 2 (70+), 3 (60+), 4 (30+), 5 (90+), 6-7, 8 (35+), 9-30
NORTHERN PINTAIL: 24 (1♂ + 1♀), 26 (1♂ + 1♀)
GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 1 (2♂ + 2♀), 2 (2), 3 (2♂ + 1♀), 5 (15+), 6-7, 9-10, 11 (1♂), 12,
14 (1♂ + 1♀), 15 (3♂ + 3♀), 16, 23-24, 26, 29 (2), 30
CANVASBACK: 10 (1♀), 24 (1♀), 28 (1♀)
REDHEAD: 3 (1♂ + 1♀), 5 (4♂ + 4♀), 8 (1♂ + 1♀), 11 (1♂ + 1♀), 24 (2♂ + 2♀), 25, 26 (3♂ + 2♀),
27, 28 (4♂ + 1♀), 29 (4♂ + 3♀), 30 (4♂ + 4♀)
RING-NECKED DUCK: 1 (2♂), 3 (3♂ + 1♀), 5 (2♂ + 2♀), 7-10, 11-13 (1♂ + 1♀), 14 (3♂ + 3♀),
15 (2♂ + 2♀), 16, 19 (1♂ + 1♀), 21 (2♂ + 1♀), 22, 24-30
LESSER SCAUP: 1 (44+), 2 (27), 3 (41+), 4 (8), 5 (120+), 6-7, 8 (25+), 9-18, 19 (5♂ + 7♀), 20,
21 (5♂ + 4♀), 22 (8♂ + 7♀), 23 (5♂ + 6♀), 24 (9♂ + 13♀), 25 (7♂ + 5♀),
26 (7♂ + 6♀), 27 (3♂ + 4♀), 28 (2♂ + 3♀), 29 (2♂ + 1♀), 30 (4♂ + 2♀)
BUFFLEHEAD: 1 (14♂ + 10♀), 2 (20+), 3 (12+), 4 (16♂ + 14♀), 5 (22+), 6, 7 (74+), 8 (33+), 9-21,
22 (100+), 23-27, 28 (17+), 29 (7), 30 (5)
COMMON GOLDENEYE: 13 (1♂ + 1♀), 18 (1♀), 28 (1♀)
HOODED MEGANSER: 1 (2♂ + 2♀), 2 (2♂), 3 (9♂ + 3♀), 4 (1♂ + 2♀), 5 (2♂), 7 (3♂), 8 (1♂)
COMMON MERGANSER: 1 (4♂ + 1♀), 2 (1♂ + 2♀), 4 (2♂ + 1♀), 9 (1♂), 11 (1♂), 14 (1♂ + 1♀)
RED-BREASTED MERGANSER: 1 (3♂), 2, 3 (6♂ + 1♀), 4 (5♂), 5 (4♂), 8 (2♂ + 1♀), 12 (1♂ + 4♀),
15 (2♀), 21 (1♀)
RUDDY DUCK: 1 (1♀), 2 (3♂ + 2♀), 3 (2♀), 5 (16+), 6, 7 (2♂), 8 (1♀), 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 11 (6), 12 (7),
13 (1♂ + 1♀), 14 (17), 15 (1♂ + 2♀), 16 (1♂ + 1♀), 18 (5), 19 (7), 20 (8), 21 (5),
22 (~140), 23-25, 26 (19), 27 (1♂ + 4♀), 28 (10), 29 (7), 30 (24)
RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 4, 7-9, 10 (1♂ BY +), 11-16, 18-20, 22-30
COMMON LOON: 1 (1), 3 (2), 4-5 (3), 6 (8), 7 (3), 8 (1), 9-13 (2), 14-15 (7), 16 (8), 17 (1), 18 (6),
19 (7), 20 (6), 21 (3), 22 (2), 23 (1), 24 (2), 25 (1)
PIED-BILLED GREBE: 1 (1), 2 (2), 3-5 (1), 6, 7-8 (5), 9 (6), 10 (54), 11 (26+), 12 (25+), 13-14,
15 (13+), 16 (14+), 18 (8), 19 (12+), 20 (19+), 21 (16+), 22 (250+), 23, 24 (27+),
25 (30+), 26 (6), 27 (10), 28 (2), 29 (10), 30 (19)
HORNED GREBE: 12-13 (1 abp), 14 (3 abp), 19 (1 abp), 20 (3 abp), 21 (5), 24 (2), 25 (1), 26-27 (3),
28-29 (1), 30 (2)
EARED GREBE: 15 (2 abp), 16 (4 abp), 18 (5 abp), 19 (6 abp), 20 (9), 21 (21), 22 (14+), 23 (4),
24 (18), 25 (11), 26 (9), 27 (8), 28 (7), 29 (5), 30 (1)
DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 1 (1), 5 (27), 9 (21), 10 (45), 14 (39), 18 (2), 20 (2), 21 (30),
24 (20), 27 (2), 29 (16), 30 (1)
AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 6 (29), 12 (~50), 14 (~30), 15 (25+), 21 (~100)
AMERICAN BITTERN: 25 (1)
GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (3), 2 (2), 3 (6), 4 (5), 6 (3), 7 (6), 8-9 (3), 10 (17), 11 (13), 12 (12), 13 (13),
14 (5), 15 (15), 16 (5), 17 (2), 18 (14), 19 (13), 20 (9), 21 (4), 22 (8), 23-24 (6),
25 (8), 26 (4), 27 (5), 28-30 (3)
GREAT EGRET: 10 (1), 14-15 (1), 21 (1), 23 (1)
GREEN HERON: 22 (1), 24-26 (1)
TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (1), 2 (2), 3 (4), 5 (3), 7 (5), 8 (10+), 9, 10 (1), 11 (10+), 12 (2), 13 (3), 14 (12+),
15-16 (3), 18 (3), 19 (7+), 20-21 (3), 23 (3), 24 (5), 25 (1), 26 (10+), 27 (4+),
28 (9+), 29 (12+), 30 (3)
OSPREY: 2-3 (1), 8 (1), 10-11 (1), 12 (2), 13 (1), 14-16 (3), 17 (1), 18 (9), 19 (4), 20 (5), 21 (6), 22 (1),
23-25 (2), 26-27 (1)
BALD EAGLE: 3-4 (1 ad), 9 (1 4-yr), 10 (1 ad), 13 (1 ad), 19 (1 ad + 1 im), 21 (1 ad + 1 im), 24 (1 ad)
NORTHERN HARRIER: 9 (1♀)
SHARP-SHINNED HAWK: 17 (1 im BY), 23-24 (1 ad)
COOPER’S HAWK: 1 (1 im), 8 (1 ad + 1 im BY), 10 (1 ad), 13 (1 im BY), 14 (1 im BY + 1 ad),
15 (1 im BY), 20-21 (1 im), 26 (2 im), 29 (1 ad), 30 (1)
Accipiter sp.: 12 (1 BY)
BROAD-WINGED HAWK: 30 (1)
SWAINSON’S HAWK: 15 (1)
RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (3 + 1 dark), 2 (2), 3 (3), 4 (2), 5 (3), 7 (2), 8-9 (1), 10 (4), 11 (2), 12 (3),
13 (2), 14-16 (1), 18 (1), 19-20 (2), 21-22 (1), 23 (2), 24 91), 25-26 (2), 27 (1),
28 (4), 30 (1)
GOLDEN EAGLE: 4 (1 ju)
AMERICAN COOT: 1 (4), 2 (3), 3 (18), 4 (15), 5 (54), 6, 7 (55+), 8 (39+), 9-10, 11 (200+), 12-30
SANDHILL CRANE: 24 (1)
KILLDEER: 1-6, 8-11, 14-15, 19, 21, 23-30
SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 18-19 (1), 29 (2)
SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 14 (1)
GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 13 (1), 16 (2), 21 (8), 23 (3)
WILLET: 29 (1)
LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 6 (1), 13 (1), 25 (1)
Yellowlegs sp.: 4, 15 (1), 24 (4), 30
MARBLED GODWIT: 15 (7)
Sandpiper sp.: 30 (15)
WILSON’S SNIPE: 23 (4), 27 (3), 28 (1)
AMERICAN WOODCOCK: 1 (1), 3 (1), 6, 8 (1), 9 (3)
WILSON’S PHALAROPE: 12-13 (1♀), 18 (1♀), 19-21 (2♀), 23 (4♀), 24-25 (11), 26 (2♂ + 9♀),
27 (1♂ + 9♀), 28 (1♂ + 11♀), 29 (1♀), 30 (2♀)
RING-BILLED GULL: 1-2 (50+), 3 (70+), 4 (120+), 5 (40+), 6, 7 (17+), 8 (9+), 9-12, 14 (2), 15 (1), 19,
21, 22 (32), 23 (2), 24 (1), 28 (1)
HERRING GULL: 3 (1)
FRANKLIN’S GULL: 6 (1), 11 (1), 15 (55), 16 (2), 18 (1), 19, 22 (2), 23 (8)
BONAPARTE’S GULL: 9-10 (4), 15-16 (3), 19 (12+), 22 (4), 23 (10), 25 (1)
FORSTER’S TERN: 16 (1), 21 (1), 30 (1)
MOURNING DOVE: 2-3, 5-30
BELTED KINGFISHER: 8-9 (1), 10-12 (1), 14 (2), 15 (1), 18 (2), 19 (1), 20 (2), 21-22 (1), 24-25 (1),
27 (1)
RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 3, 5-6, 13, 20, 27-29
YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER: 13 (1), 20 (1), 24-25 (1)
DOWNY WOODPECKER: 2, 4-6, 8-20, 22-30
HAIRY WOODPECKER: 3-4, 6, 8, 10-11, 13, 17-18, 21, 24, 26-28
NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1-3 (1), 4 (3), 7-10, 11 (12+), 12-16, 18-28, 30
AMERICAN KESTREL: 3 (1♂), 10 (1♀), 22-23 (1♂), 25 (1♂)
EASTERN PHOEBE: 4-5 (1), 7-9 (1), 10 (4), 11 (3), 13 (1), 14, 15 (2), 18-19 (1), 21-22 (2), 24-27 (1)
EASTERN KINGBIRD: 26 (1)
LOGGERHEAD SHRIKE: 13 (1)
BLUE JAY: 1-2, 10, 19, 25, 27-30
AMERICAN CROW: 1-30
PURPLE MARTIN: 4 (1), 7 (1), 8-9 (2), 10 (6), 11 (14+), 12, 13 (14+), 14-15, 18-22, 23 (30+), 24-30
TREE SWALLOW: 4 (1), 7 (5), 8 (12+), 9-10, 12, 14-16, 18-30
NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 23 (3), 24-27, 29
BANK SWALLOW: 26 (1)
BARN SWALLOW: 20 (1), 21, 23-28, 30
BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-30
WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 3, 5, 11, 13, 15, 20, 24-25, 27-28
BROWN CREEPER: 24-25 (2)
HOUSE WREN: 28 (2), 29-30
BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER: 30 (1)
GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET: 5 (1), 20 (2)
RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET: 5 (1), 10 (2), 11 (5), 14 (1 BY + 1), 15 (4), 16 (1), 18 (1), 20 (1),
21 (1 BY + 1), 22 (3), 23 (1), 24 (5), 25 (2), 26 (3), 27-29 (1), 30 (4)
EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 (4♂ + 2♀), 2, 3 (3♂ + 1♀), 4, 5 (1♀), 7 (1♂), 8 (1♂ + 3♀), 9 (3♂ + 2♀),
10-11, 13 (5), 18 (3), 19 (4), 20 (1), 21 (4), 22 (5), 23 (3), 28 (1♂ + 1♀),
30 (2♂ + 2♀)
HERMIT THRUSH: 9 (3), 10 (1), 11 (4), 12 (2), 13 (4), 14 (3), 15 (1), 16 (2), 19 (3), 21 (2), 23 (1),
24 (3), 25 (2)
AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-30
BROWN THRASHER: 16 (1), 20 (1), 21 (1 BY), 22 (1), 23 (2 + 1 BY), 24-25 (1), 26 (3), 27 (2),
28-29 (1 BY + 2), 30 (3)
EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-30
BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 30 (1)
ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 29 (1), 30 (2)
NASHVILLE WARBLER: 30 (1♂)
COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 30 (1♂)
YELLOW WARBLER: 29-30 (1)
PALM WARBLER: 29 (2), 30 (5)
YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Myrtle): 9 (1), 10 (6), 11 (2), 13 (1 BY + 1), 14-16 (1), 19-20 (1),
22 (1), 23 (5), 24 (14+), 25 (3), 26 (4), 27 (1), 29 (6), 30 (7)
EASTERN TOWHEE: 28 (1♂ BY), 29-30 (1♂)
AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 1-3, 4 (12), 5 (9+), 7 (1), 8-17, 18 (6+), 19 (7+), 20 (1), 21 (2), 22 (5),
23 (7), 24 (2), 27-28 (1 BY)
CHIPPING SPARROW: 10 (1), 14 (1 BY), 16 (1), 19-20 (1), 21-24, 26-30
FIELD SPARROW: 5 (1), 9-10 (1), 14 (1 BY), 15-16 (1), 18 (1), 21 (1), 27 (1)
VESPER SPARROW: 9 (3), 10 (1), 12 (1), 13 (6+), 14 (10+), 16 (5), 19 (2), 21 (4), 23 (3)
LARK SPARROW: 21 (2)
SAVANNAH SPARROW: 14 (3), 16 (2), 20-23 (1), 30 (1)
LE CONTE’S SPARROW: 15 (1)
FOX SPARROW: 1 (1), 9 (1 BY + 24), 10 (1 BY + 4), 11 (3 + 2 BY), 12 (1 BY), 13 (2 + 1 BY),
14 (1 BY + 5), 15 (1), 16 (1 + 1 BY), 17 (1 BY), 18 (4 BY), 19-20 (2 BY + 3),
21 (2 BY + 1), 22 (1 BY + 1), 23 (1 BY), 24 (1), 25 (3), 27 (1 BY)
SONG SPARROW: 1-30
LINCOLN’S SPARROW: 29 (1 BY), 30 (2 BY + 1)
SWAMP SPARROW: 3 (1), 7 (1), 25-26 (1)
WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: 22 (1 BY), 25 (1 BY), 29 (3 BY + 7), 30 (3 BY + 20+)
HARRIS’S SPARROW: 2 (2 BY), 3 (3 BY), 6, 9 (1 BY), 13-14 (1 BY), 15 (3 BY), 17 91 BY),
18-19 (2 BY), 20-21 (1 BY), 23 (2 BY), 25-26 (1 BY), 27 (2 + 1 BY), 28-29 (4 BY),
30 (3 BY + 1)
WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW: 8 (3), 30 (2 BY + 1)
DARK-EYED JUNCO (Slate-colored): 1-25, 30 (1)
NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-30
RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-30
EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 5 (1), 7 (1), 8, 11-30
RUSTY BLACKBIRD: 23 (1)
COMMON GRACKLE: 1-30
BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1 (1♂), 3 (2♂), 4 (1♂), 5, 7-8, 10-11, 13-22, 24-30
BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 30 (1♂)
PURPLE FINCH: 2 (1♂ BY), 9 (1♀ BY), 10 (1♂ BY), 23 (2♂)
HOUSE FINCH: 1-30
AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 2, 4-5, 7-11, 13-14, 16-21, 24-30
HOUSE SPARROW: 1-5, 7-30
MAMMALIAN
COYOTE: 2, 6, 26
WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (3 + 5 BY), 3 (4), 4 (4 BY + 8), 5 (1), 6 (3), 8 (9), 9-10 (4), 11 (2 BY),
12 (7 BY), 13 (1 BY), 15 (3), 18 (20), 20 (2 BY + 4), 22 (1), 23-24 (4), 25 (4 BY),
28 (2), 29 (4), 30 (3)
WOODCHUCK: 10 (1), 19 (1)
FOX SQUIRREL: 1-5, 7, 9-14, 17-18, 20-22, 24, 27-30
THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 20 (1), 26 91), 27, 29-30
EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 22 (1)
MUSKRAT: 20 (1)
EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 2, 4-30
REPTILIAN
EASTERN GARTER SNAKE: 8 (1), 30 (1)
NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 3 (1), 4 (15+), 7 (1), 8, 14, 20, 22, 24-30
RED-EARED SLIDER: 4 (1), 8 (3), 14 (1), 27 (1), 28 (2), 29 (1)
AMPHIBIAN
AMERICAN TOAD: 28-30
EASTERN GRAY TREEFROG: 28-29
BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 4, 6-9, 14, 16, 19-30
NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 25, 28-29
LEPIDOPTERA
BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 30 (3)
CABBAGE WHITE: 29-30 (2)
MOURNING CLOAK: 8 (2), 24 (1), 26 (1), 29 (1), 30 (2)
RED ADMIRAL: 8 (1), 26 (1)
ODONATA
COMMON GREEN DARNER: 8 (1), 26 (5), 28 (1), 29 (5+), 30
VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 8 (2), 30 (3)

Wolf. Oesterreich
 

Sunday, May 5, 2013

May 3, 2013: Snow in May?


And this photo, taken from the southeast corner of the south lake, only shows the start of the 7 inch accumulation over May 2nd and 3rd.  5/2/13 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, May 4, 2013

May 2, 2012: Sand Hill Crane


Sand Hill Crane in Pool A. 5/1/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This digiscoped photo shows a Sandhill Crane found at Pool A this cold and windy afternoon (1st).  This is only the second time that I've found a crane actually on Park property.  All the other times have been fly-bys.  (Due to the distance and wind the photo is not as sharp as I would have liked it to be.)  The crane took flight before I left the Upland Trail.

I also found my second Snowy Egret for the Park.  It was in the company of 5 Great Egrets at Pool F.  The size difference was quite noticeable, with the Snowy smaller species.  Unfortunately, all of the photographs were a bit fuzzy.  (Again, thanks to the distance and wind.)  As I left the Park, the egrets were observed flying southwesterly.

Wolf.  Oesterreich 

Wednesday, May 1, 2013

May 1, 2013: Eastern Towhee


This male Eastern Towhee was found on the west side of the bluff on Monday (29th).  I first heard him call ("drink-your-teeeee") before actually spotting him.  This species and the Spotted Towhee were once lumped together as the Rufous-sided Towhee.  Both can be found in our area, although the Eastern is more common. 4/29/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)