Saturday, June 30, 2012

Friday, June 29, 2012

June 28, 2012: Invasive Species Program

 Erv Klaas discusses the history of the park and why previous land use has had such an impact on the invasive species found here, 6/28/12 (Kevin Kane)

A hardy group of about 15 braved the hot and humid weather to to learn about invasive species of plants, animals, and insects that inhabit the park and what can be done to manage them.

More photos from the program can be found here.


Japanese Beetles and Crown Vetch, 6/28/12 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, June 28, 2012

June 27, 2012: More Aerial Photos!

Aerial photograph of Ada Hayden Park taken on Sunday afternoon, 6/22 looking south. (Kevin Kane)

Thanks to Jim Giglierano at the Iowa Dept. of Natural Resources we have a new set of oblique aerial photos for the park.  You can see them all here.


Wednesday, June 27, 2012

June 26, 2012: Invasive Species Program on 6/28



Thistle seed heads harvested on Friends of AHHP thistle patrol, 6/14/12 (Dave Brotherson)

The Friends of AHHP Interpretive Program on invasive species (originally scheduled for May 31st)will be held on Thursday, June 28, at 5:30pm. Meet at the shelter on the north side of the park.

What is an "invasive" species? What is a "native" species? What is a naturalized species?

Here is a list of species we will see and identify. Can you put them into the above three categories?

Eastern red cedar
birdsfoot trefoil
crown vetch
black willow
Siberian elm
mulberry
Ring-necked Pheasant
Red-winged Blackbird
Common Grackle
cottonwood
honeysuckle
smooth brome
yellow sweet clover
reed canary grass
cattail

Erv Klaas

Tuesday, June 26, 2012

June 25, 2012: Skunk River Paddlers


Paddler on the north lake, 5/3/12 (Kevin Kane)

Recreation, and paddling in particular, is about as non disruptive as it gets and fits nicely with the goals of the Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park and the the enjoyment of the greater community. 

The Skunk River Paddlers sponsor a weekly paddling event at Hayden Park every Wednesday evening at 7pm from memorial day to labor day. If you have any questions about the group contact Greg Vitale, vitol_g at yahoo.com.

In addition, JAX rents canoes and kayaks on Saturday and Sunday afternoons through the summer.

So get out there and paddle!

Monday, June 25, 2012

June 24, 2012: Wolf's Field Notes, 6/22/12















Halloween Pennant, 6/22/12 (Wolf Oesterreich)

The Halloween Pennant above was my first one of the year. (We missed it yesterday (6/21) during the Odonate walk.) It was found at the NE corner of Jensen Pond. They tend to perch high and are easily approached.

While looking at Odonates at the SW corner, I watched a family of American Mink (♀ with 4 kits) work their way along the shoreline. They didn't notice my presence until 10 feet away. The mother scampered back but the kits kept on coming. By the time I got my camera out of the bag the kits were within 2 feet of me, although mostly hidden in the vegetation. I could hear them making noises and watched the rustling vegetation. I stood there in awe, forgetting to snap a photograph. By now the mother had rejoined them as they circumnavigated around me. I soon lost track of them. I'm assuming that the mother is the mink that Ev Klaas had been seeing.

Wolf


Wolfgang Oesterreich
Ames

Sunday, June 24, 2012

June 23, 2012: Erv's Field Notes #41

 Great Blue Heron takes off from what is left of the northwest wetland on 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, June 23, 2012, 3-4 pm. Partly cloudy, slight breeze from the south, Temperature 78 degrees F.
I went to the park today to check on a site where several of us have been working to control a large infestation of musk thistle. As I passed by a wetland next to the path, I noticed a Great Blue Heron on the far shore of the pond. This wetland is gradually drying up and only a small shallow puddle is left. I looked at the heron through my binoculars and could plainly see that it had a large fish in its beak. On closer look, I identified it as a common carp that I estimated to be 12-14 inches long. The fish was cross-ways in the bird’s large beak. The heron stood there for several minutes holding the fish as if puzzled with what do to with it. But, of course, the heron knew. He (or she) tilted its head back and began to turn the fish so that the head of the fish was pointed down its throat. Then, with a big gulp, it swallowed it whole. I could see the large lump pass down its long narrow neck on its way to the stomach. A few minutes later, the heron flew off towards the north. I have seen herons eat fish a number of times, including catfish with their spiny pectoral fins pointed out but, this was the largest fish I have seen a heron eat. The National Geographic web site says that Great Blue Herons have been known to choke to death from trying to swallow a fish that was too large.
 
If you are interested, here is the address of a live cam of a heron nest in Ithaca, NY, where a large brood is nearing the time when they will leave the nest:

While I was watching this drama unfold, several cyclists and runners passed by without even glancing at what I was seeing. I suspect many of the park’s visitors don’t take the time to view all of the natural wonders that are there.

Erv Klaas

Saturday, June 23, 2012

June 22, 2012: Photo of the Day: Dragonflies




Tana Tesdall took these closeups during the interpretive program on Thursday, 6/21/12 (Tana Tesdall)

Thursday, June 21, 2012

June 21, 2012: Dragonfly Interpretive Program

 Erv Klaas and Wolf Oesterreich talk about the dragonflies and damselflies of  Ada Hayden Park, 6/21/12 (Kevin Kane)

View all the photos here:
Erv's dragonfly photos here:

Other select photos from the interpretive program:





Posted by Picasa

June 20, 2012: Photo of the Day:

Reminder! 
Dragonfly Interpretive Walk with Erv Klaas and Wolf Oesterreich
Thursday, June 21 at 5:30
Meet at North Shelter



Common Milkweed in bloom in the southern prairie, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

More about Common Milkweed

Wednesday, June 20, 2012

June 19, 2012: Next Interpretive Talk 6/21 - Dragonflies




Yellow-legged or Autumn Meadowhawk - immature female (Erv Klaas)

June 21. Come and learn about a group of colorful insects whose ancestors originated some 250
million years ago and depend on clean water for reproduction. Erv Klaas and Wolf Oesterreich, who have identified 50 species of dragonflies and damselflies that occur in the park, will lead the program. Bring binoculars if you have them.


Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park announces a series of nature interpretive programs. The programs will be held each Thursday evening at 5:30 pm, beginning May 17, and continue through June 28. All programs will begin at the shelter on the north side unless otherwise indicated.

June 18, 2012: Photo of the Day: Sculpture on the Prairie


The Inuksuit sculpture is slowly enveloped by the surrounding prairie, 5/5/12 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, June 18, 2012

June 17, 2012: Photo of the Day: Compass Plant






One of the first compass plants to bloom in the west prairie overlooks the southwest wetlands, 6/16/12 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, June 16, 2012

June 16, 2012: TCU: Thistle Control Unit


Lone thistle overlooking the park ont the southwest hillside looking east, 6/16/12 (Dave Brotherson)

A group of about 15 hearty individuals attacked the thisle patches on the southwest prairie area this morning making fast work of controlling the pretty but pesky invasive species.

Photos of the work group here...

Dave Brotherson describes his thorough method of control:



Other select photos from this mornings work:








Friday, June 15, 2012

June 15, 2012: Erv's Field Notes #40 -- Important Notice!

Come help remove thistles from your park!
Saturday, June 16, at 9 am at the Harrison St. (SW) parking area
See details below...


Thistle growing in the south prairie, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, June 14, 2012, 10 am. Clear, sunny, strong southerly breeze, temperature about 80 degrees F.

I have been surveying areas of the park for invasive plant species and creating a spread sheet with a list of species according to designated areas. I am finding a lot of invasive species. Some are native, some are non-native, and some are on the state's noxious weed list. By the end of the summer I hope to have a draft report with recommendations on what should be done to control these species. I will discuss my preliminary observations in an interpretive program on June 28.

Of immediate concern is the infestation of musk thistle that is now in full bloom in several areas of the park. Jon Hunstock and I spent several hours last week pulling musk thistle from areas on the north side and on the north west shore of the south lake. Yesterday, I found a large patch in the southwest corner of the park, due west of the Harrison Street parking lot. I worked about two hours this morning and pulled or cut about 30 percent of this stand of thistle. Many of the plants are large and robust and I could not get them out of the ground because of the dry hard ground. So, I began removing flowering heads (some of which were beginning to go to seed) and putting them in a large plastic bag. I did not finish the job.

I am appealing for help to eradicate this stand of thistles this Saturday, June 16, at 9 am. The more people that show up, the less time it will take. I will provide garbage bags for the seed heads. Please bring a hand sickle or other cutting device to cut the plants off at the ground level. We will pull the smaller plants. It is absolutely necessary to wear thick heavy gloves; these plants have very sharp spines that will easily puncture light weight gloves. I recommend a long sleeve shirt as well. I will provide necessary training beforehand in identification, natural history, and how to control this noxious weed.

Erv Klaas

June 14, 2012: Mammals!

 Jim Pease talks with with about 55 would-be mammologists Thursday at Ada Hayden Heritage Park before taking the group out looking for signs of mammals in the park, 6/14/12 (Kevin Kane)

See the entire photo album here.


Selected photos from the album:











Thursday, June 14, 2012

June 13, 2012: Iowa Drought Shows in AHHP

Reminder! Mammals Interpretive Walk with Jim Pease
Thursday, June 14 at 5:30
Meet at North Shelter



 West-central wetland begins to show signs of drought conditions.  This area was teeming with wildlife just 3 weeks ago before a beaver dam was removed, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

See Des Moines Register story on the drought:
http://blogs.desmoinesregister.com/dmr/index.php/2012/06/14/southern-iowa-added-to-drought-status/

Wednesday, June 13, 2012

June 12, 2012: Next Interpretive Program 6/14 - Mammals with Jim Pease


Rabbit surveys the post prairie fire landscape, 4/12/12 (Kevin Kane)

June 14. Learn about the park’s mammals from Jim Pease, retired ISU wildlife extension specialist.

Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park announces a series of nature interpretive programs. The programs will be held each Thursday evening at 5:30 pm, beginning May 17, and continue through June 28. All programs will begin at the shelter on the north side unless otherwise indicated.


Tuesday, June 12, 2012

June 11, 2012: Wolf's Notes


Gorgone Checkerspot, 6/11/12 (Wolf Oesterreich)

While walking back from Pond G I came across a small species of butterfly, Gorgone Checkerspot, that I had never seen before. It was very cooperative as it perched on top of a dead (last year's) flower head. despite the blowing wind. This species occurs regularly throughout the southern three-fourths of Iowa and is found in a variety of open habitats. They emerge in late April to early June, with a second brood from late June to late July, and the third in August. They are not as common as the Pearl Crescent.

Wolf

June 10, 2012: Photo of the Day: Rattlesnake Master

 Rattlesnake Master in southwest prairie, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)


Sunday, June 10, 2012

June 9, 2012: Photo of the Day: Butterfly Milkweed


Butterfly Milkweed is in full bloom right now in the prairie areas of the park, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

Friday, June 8, 2012

June 8, 2012: AHHP Hydrology


Bill Simpkins orients the audience to the immediate surroundings of the park, 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday's interpretive program on the hydrology of Ada Hayden Park drew about 25 people.  Bill Simpkins from Iowa State Universtiy talked about the history, current, and future water issues of the park, Ames, and the surrounding regions.

More photos here.

Thursday, June 7, 2012

June 7, 2012: Badger!





Badger sighting on 6/6/12 (Wolf Oesterreich)

This afternoon I recorded the first North American Badger (that I have seen) for the Park. I found it outside its burrow, near the NW corner of the Upland Trail. I had seen a large burrow on the other side of the trail for over a week and suspected the presence of badgers. Now it is confirmed.

A Woodchuck has been sighted at the diminishing Pool F at least twice within the past week. (A few years back, one was killed by two unleashed dogs.)

Wolf

Wolfgang Oesterreich
Ames

Wednesday, June 6, 2012

June 6, 2012: Next Interpretive Walk is Thursday 6/7 - Hydrology of AHHP




The north lake and north marsh looking southeast from the northwest hills, 5/12/12 (Kevin Kane)

Bill Simpkins has studied the ground water and hydrology of the Hayden Park Watershed and he will discuss how the lake and wetlands have become the main feature of this unique landscape.

Meet near the lake outlet across Dawes Drive from Calhoun Park and Connelly’s Trucking Co. at 5:30pm.

June 5, 2012: Photo of the Day: Spectators


Deer watch closely on the southwest upland trail, 5/5/12 (Kevin Kane)




Tuesday, June 5, 2012

June 4, 2012: May Photo Collage


Photos posted in May by Kevin Kane, Erv Klaas, & Wolf Oesterreich.

June 3, 2012: Wolf's May Species Report


Pheasant flies into cover east of the central pond, 5/5/12 (Kevin Kane)

A total of 132 avian species (+ 2 sp.) was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 4th highest (also tied with May 2005) May among 15 years of records.

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard). The order follows the 52nd Supplement (2011) to the American Ornithologists’ UnionCheck-list of North American Birds and the 11th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
    CANADA GOOSE: 1-31
    WOOD DUCK: 1 (1♂), 2 (1♂ + 1♀), 3, 6 (1♂ + 1♀), 7, 10 (2), 11-12, 16, 17 (6+), 18-21, 22 (2♂ + 1♀),
                                   23 (5♂ + 1♀), 24-27, 29-30
    GADWALL: 2 (8+), 4, 5 (1), 6 (9), 7-11, 13 (2), 29 (1♂)
    MALLARD: 1 (11+), 2 (13+), 3-13, 15-30
    BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1 (65+), 2 (150+), 3-11, 13, 14-21, 22-23 (1♂), 24 (6♂ + 2♀), 25-26, 27 (1♂),
                                   28 (8), 29 (2), 30 (2♂ + 1♀)
    NORTHERN SHOVELER: 1 (16+), 2-12
    NORTHERN PINTAIL: 10 (1♂)
    GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 3 (2+)
    REDHEAD: 9 (1♂), 11-13 (2♂), 15 (2♂), 17-21 (2♂)
    RING-NECKED DUCK: 20 (1♀), 22-24 (1♀), 26 (1♀)
    LESSER SCAUP: 2 (16), 6 (1♂), 26 (1♀)
    HOODED MERGANSER: 11 (1♂)
    RED-BREASTED MERGANSER: 22 (1♀)
    RUDDY DUCK: 2 (4), 8 (4)
    RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1-30, 31 (1♂ BY)
    COMMON LOON: 25 (1 anb)
    PIED-BILLED GREBE: 1 (1), 2 (3), 4-5 (1), 6 (2), 8 (1), 10 (1)
    HORNED GREBE: 2 (1)
    DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 1-2 (1), 27 (1)
    AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 2 (2)
    LEAST BITTERN: 28 (1)
    GREAT BLUE HERON: 3 (1), 4-6 (2), 7 (1), 8 (2), 10-11 (2), 13 (1), 15 (5), 16-18 (2), 20 (1), 21-22 (2),
                                   23-24 (2), 25-26 (1), 27 (5), 28 (3), 29 (4), 30 (6)
    GREAT EGRET: 16 (1)
    GREEN HERON: 2 (3), 3 (1), 4 (3), 5 (2), 7 (1), 9 (3), 10 (1), 11 (2), 15-16 (1), 22 (1), 24 (2), 26 (1)
    BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: 15 (1 1st Summer)
    TURKEY VULTURE: 1-4, 6-8, 11, 15, 18-20, 23-29
    OSPREY: 25 (1)
    BALD EAGLE: 5 (1 ad), 17 (1 ad)
    COOPER’S HAWK: 8 (1)
    RED-TAILED HAWK: 1-6 (1), 11 (2), 16 (1), 22 (1), 24-30 (1)
    SORA: 3 (3), 4 (1), 5-6 (2), 7 (1), 8-10 (2), 11 (1), 15-17 (1), 20-21 (1), 23 (1)
    AMERICAN COOT: 1 (55+), 2 (127+), 3-15, 16 (11), 17-19, 20 (7), 21-22 (6), 23 (5), 24 (7), 25 (5),
                                   26 (7), 27 (10), 28 (9), 29 (4), 30 (7)
    SEMIPALMATED PLOVER: 2 (1), 11 (2), 13 (6), 16 (5), 30 (2)
    KILLDEER: 1-13, 15-30
    AMERICAN AVOCET: 2 (4)
    SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 (3), 2 (13), 3-5, 6 (7), 7-13, 15-17, 19, 21, 23-25, 28-30
    SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 11 (2), 16-17 (1)
    GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 3 (1), 7 (2), 9, 10 (3)
    WILLET: 2 (5)
    LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 2, 3 (50+), 6-13, 15-16, 18, 24-25 (2), 30 (1)
    SANDERLING: 15 (3)
    SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 2 (2), 4 (1), 10 (3), 11, 13, 15-17, 26 (6), 30 (2)
    LEAST SANDPIPER: 10 (2), 11, 13, 15-16
    WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER: 10-11 (1), 30 (5)
    PECTORAL SANDPIPER: 2 (1), 10 (4), 11, 15-17, 19 (3), 24 (6), 26 (1), 29 (1), 30 (3)
    DUNLIN: 11 (1), 16 (2)
    Sandpiper sp.: 20 (13), 21 (4), 25 (4)
    WILSON’S SNIPE: 1 (1)
    WILSON’S PHALAROPE: 2 (1), 3 (2)
    BONAPARTE’S GULL: 9 (1)
    FRANKLIN’S GULL: 24 (7)
    RING-BILLED GULL: 2 (7)
    CASPIAN TERN: 31 (1)
    FORSTER’S TERN: 2-3 (1), 10 (1)
    MOURNING DOVE: 1-11, 13-31
    BARRED OWL: 3 (1), 6 (2), 12-13 (1), 21 (1), 25 (2), 30 (2)
    COMMON NIGHTHAWK: 18 (1), 22 (1)
    RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 20 (1), 22 (1♂), 24, 27
    BELTED KINGFISHER: 1 (1), 3 (2), 4 (1♂), 6 (1♂), 9 (1), 13, 15-16, 22 (1♂), 27
    RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 6, 10, 19
    DOWNY WOODPECKER: 2-3, 5-7, 10-11, 13, 15-17, 19-20, 25, 27-28, 30
    HAIRY WOODPECKER: 1, 6, 17, 27-29
    NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 2-6, 13, 16, 20 (1)
    OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 25 (1)
    EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 11 (1), 19, 23-24, 26-28, 30
    ALDER FLYCATCHER: 25-26 (1), 28 (2)
    LEAST FLYCATCHER: 2 (1), 5 (1), 9 (1)
    Empidonax sp.: 24, 29
    EASTERN PHOEBE: 13, 30 (1)
    GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 5 (1), 13, 16, 25, 30
    EASTERN KINGBIRD: 2 (1), 3 (3), 5 (2), 6 (1), 7-8 (2), 9 (1), 11 (2), 13, 15 (2), 16-17 (3), 19 (3),
                                   21 (2), 22 (1), 24 (3), 25-26, 29 (2), 30 (2), 31
    WARBLING VIREO: 1 (6), 2-7, 9-11, 13, 15-30
    RED-EYED VIREO: 6 (2), 24
    BLUE JAY: 2-6, 9-11, 13, 22, 30
    AMERICAN CROW: 1-11, 13, 15-31
    PURPLE MARTIN: 1-7, 9-11, 13-31
    TREE SWALLOW: 1-11, 13, 15-31
    NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLLOW: 1, 5, 7-8, 11, 23, 25-26
    BANK SWALLOW: 8, 15
    CLIFF SWALLOW: 24
    BARN SWALLOW: 1-11, 13, 15-31
    BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-6, 8-11, 13, 15-16, 18-31
    WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 4-6, 10, 19, 26
    HOUSE WREN: 1-11, 13-31
    WINTER WREN: 6 (1)
    MARSH WREN: 9 (1), 11 (1), 16 (2), 17 (1), 19-20 (1), 23 (1), 25-26 (1), 29-30 (1)
    RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET: 6 (1), 8 (2)
    EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 (2), 2 (1♂ + 1♀), 3-4 (2), 5 (1), 8 (1), 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 11 (2♂), 13 (1♂), 15 (1♂),
                                   17 (1♂ + 2♀), 19-21 (1), 23 (1), 24 (1♂), 27-28 (2), 29-30 (1)
    GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH: 6 (2)
    SWAINSON’S THRUSH: 2 (2), 3 (1), 5 (1), 6 (5+), 7, 8 (2), 11
    AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
    GRAY CATBIRD: 1 (1), 3, 5-11, 13, 16-25, 27-31
    BROWN THRASHER: 1 (2 BY + 1), 2-11, 13-18, 20-30
    EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-11, 13, 15-31
    CEDAR WAXWING: 5 (4 BY + ), 19 (2), 20, 25, 28 (8), 29, 30 (4)
    OVENBIRD: 6 (2), 7 (1)
    NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH: 2-3 (1), 5-6 (1), 11 (1), 16 (1), 28 (1)
    BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 6 (3), 20 (1)
    TENNESSEE WARBLER: 4-6, 10
    ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 2 (1)
    NASHVILLE WARBLER: 3 (1), 6, 9-10, 13
    MOURNING WARBLER: 20 (1♀)
    COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 2 (1♂), 3-13, 15-30
    AMERICAN REDSTART: 2 (1♂), 5 (1♂), 6 (10+), 7, 10-11, 13, 20 (1♀), 22 (2♀), 23 (1♀), 25 (1♀),
                                   26 (2♀), 28-30 (1♀)
    MAGNOLIA WARBLER: 5 (1), 6 (3), 8 (1), 9 (2), 11 (1), 20 (1)
    YELLOW WARBLER: 1 (1), 2 (3+), 3-6, 10-11, 13, 16-17, 21, 27, 30
    BLACKPOLL WARBLER: 5 (1), 6 (3)
    PALM WARBLER: 5 (2), 6 (4), 7 (3)
    YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Myrtle): 1-2, 5-11, 13
    WILSON’S WARBLER: 2 (1♂), 6 (1♂), 7, 11, 19 (1♂)
    EASTERN TOWHEE: 2 (1♂)
    CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-11, 13-31
    CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: 2 (4+)
    FIELD SPARROW: 1 (1), 4 (1), 28 (1)
    LARK SPARROW: 2 (2)
    SONG SPARROW: 1-13, 15-30
    LINCOLN’S SPARROW: 1 (1), 6 (1)
    WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: 2-3, 6-7
    HARRIS’S SPARROW: 2 (9+), 3, 4 (2), 5 (1), 7 (2), 8 (5), 9 (2), 11 (1)
    WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW: 1 (1 BY), 2 (4+), 3, 4 (1), 8 (2), 9-10 (1)
    NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-11, 13-31
    ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 5 (1♀), 30 (1♂)
    INDIGO BUNTING: 6 (1), 13, 15, 17, 19, 26-28, 30
    DICKCISSEL: 19 (1), 20-31
    BOBOLINK: 13 (1♂)
    RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-13, 15-31
    EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 1-11, 13, 16, 18, 21-28, 30
    COMMON GRACKLE: 1-11, 13-31
    BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1-11, 13, 15-31
    ORCHARD ORIOLE: 4 (1♀), 5 (1 1st Spring ♂), 9 (1♂), 10 (1), 13 (1♂), 16-17, 19, 24 (4♂ + 2♀), 25,
                                   27, 30
    BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 1-11, 13, 15-30
    HOUSE FINCH: 1-11, 13-31
    AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-11, 13-31
    HOUSE SPARROW: 1-11, 13-31

MAMMALIAN
    WHITE-TAILED DEER: 2 (10), 4 (3), 6 (3), 9 (3), 11 (2), 15-16 (2), 18 (3), 19 (2 + 1 fawn), 21 (1),
                                   22 (1 + 1 fawn), 24 (1), 28 (1 + 1♂), 29 (1), 30 (2 + 1♂)
    WOODCHUCK: 30 (1)
    FOX SQUIRREL: 1, 4-8, 10-11, 13
    THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 1, 3-11, 13, 15-18, 20-22, 24-25, 29-30
    EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 3-4, 6, 11, 15, 19, 28
    EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-2, 4-11, 13-31

REPTILIAN
    EASTERN GARTER SNAKE: 1 (1), 3-4 (1), 20 (1)
    COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE: 6 (1), 16 (1)
    NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-4, 6-1, 13, 15-17, 19-30
    RED-EARED SLIDER: 3 91), 5 91), 16 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
    AMERICAN TOAD: 1-4, 16-18, 22, 27
    BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 1-11, 13, 15-22, 24-30
    EASTERN GRAY TREEFROG: 1-6, 11, 19, 21
    BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 1, 4, 7
    BULLFROG: 1-7, 9-11, 13, 15-17, 19-30
    NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 6

LEPIDOPTERA
    BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 3, 20, 26, 28
    EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 6, 10-11, 13
    CHECKERED WHITE: 29 (1)
    CABBAGE WHITE: 1, 3-6, 10-11, 13, 15, 17, 20-22, 24-27, 31
    ORANGE SULPHUR: 1-11, 13, 15-17, 19-22, 24-30
    Sulphur sp.: 1-4, 6, 8, 10
    EASTERN TAILED BLUE: 9
    SUMMER AZURE: 19-24, 26-30
    AMERICAN SNOUT: 10 (1), 22 (2)
    Fritillary sp.: 26
    PEARL CRESCENT: 1, 3-4, 6, 10, 30
    QUESTIONMARK: 4, 6-7, 9-11, 13, 15-17, 19-24
    GRAY COMMA: 22, 26-28, 30
    MOURNING CLOAK: 1, 3, 4 (4), 6-7, 9, 11, 13, 15-17, 20-22
    PAINTED LADY: 1, 3, 5, 7-11, 13, 15
    RED ADMIRAL: 1-2, 4-9, 11, 13, 15-16, 21-22, 24, 26, 30
    COMMON BUCKEYE: 3-11, 13, 16-17, 20-23, 26-29
    VICEROY: 17
    HACKBERRY EMPEROR: 10
    MONARCH: 1-11, 13, 15-17, 21-23, 26, 28-29
    LEAST SKIPPER: 23, 28

ODONATE
    Spreadwing sp.: 16-17, 22
    BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 21 (1♀)
    DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 17 (1♂ + 1♀), 21, 28
    FAMILIAR BLUET: 1, 3-4, 13, 16-17, 22-23, 26, 28
    ORANGE BLUET: 17
    SLENDER BLUET: 11, 13, 16-17, 20
    EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1, 3, 7, 10-11, 13, 15-17, 19-24, 26-30
    COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1-6, 10-11, 13, 15-17, 19-21, 23, 26-28
    COMMON BASKETTAIL: 16-17, 20-23, 26-30
    EASTERN PONDHAWK: 17, 20, 22-23, 27
    DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE: 17
    COMMON WHITETAIL: 11, 16-17, 21-23, 26-30
    TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 11, 15-17, 20-23, 26-28, 30
    BLUE DASHER: 27
    VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 1, 3, 5, 16, 19, 21
    BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 21, 23, 26-30
    RED SADDLEBAGS: 23 (1), 26-28


Wolf


Wolfgang Oesterreich
Ames

Sunday, June 3, 2012

June 2, 2012: Erv's Field Notes #39



Fawn in the brush, 6/2/12 (Erv Klaas)

Saturday, June 2, 2012. 1-3 pm. Partly Cloudy, calm, temperature 72 degrees F.

I went to the park today specifically to pull musk thistle. I worked in the area north of the shelter westward and along the ridge. Although there were no dense patches, individual plants covered a large area. Because of the nice rain that fell Thursday, the thistles were easy to pull. I wore heavy gloves, of course. They were also easy to see; most were taller than the other vegetation. I worked my way to the west side of Jensen's Pond and then headed back. I left the trail and planned on passing to the west of the old wooded fence row that runs east-west. As I approached the trees on the west end of the fence row I saw a small fawn walking through the grass. The fawn still had its spots and probably was no more than a week old. I stopped and watched it disappear into a large depression. I took my camera from my bag and walked slowly towards the area that I last saw the fawn. When I got about 25 feet away, a doe jumped up and ran south. I took a few more steps and saw the fawn laying in the grass. It raised its head and looked at me as I took a picture but the vegetation blocked most of its body. I took a few more steps, hoping to get an unobstructed view, but the fawn bolted and ran in the direction that the doe took.

I took the path along the shoreline of the north lake watching for damselflies and was rewarded with my first sighting this year of a male Powdered Dance on the rocks next to the water. It was a good day all around.

Erv Klaas

Saturday, June 2, 2012

June 1, 2012: Erv's Field Notes #38


Thursday, May 31, 2012. Raining. Temperature 51 degrees F. The interpretive program on invasive
species was washed out. It is rescheduled for Thursday, June 28, 5:30 pm.

Several people showed up at the park and were disappointed. However, it would have been very wet and messy to get out into the vegetation to study the plants. Hopefully, the weather will cooperate next time. Musk thistle is showing up in several places and its control will not wait. You can find images by googling the name on a search engine.

Erv Klaas