Tuesday, September 30, 2014

Sep 30, 2014: September 2014 Photo Collage



September 2014 photos from the blog by Gregg Hadish, Kevin Kane, Wolf. Oesterreich, , and LaDan Omidvar.

Monday, September 29, 2014

Sep 29, 2014: White-faced Meadowhawk



White-faced Meadowhawks are still quite common this time of year. Almost every meadowhawk that  I have observed this week has been a White-faced. The male is on the left, with the female on the right. 9/6/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, September 25, 2014

Sep 25, 2014: Familiar Bluet


Familiar Bluets (Enallagma civile) can still found at the Park, but in fewer numbers.
Flight Season in Iowa: May-October
Total length = 28-39mm
9/18/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, September 22, 2014

Sep 22, 2014: Monarch


This male (note the two black spots on the hindwings near the end of the abdomen) Monarch is just one of many that have been migrating southward through the Park. 9/13/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, September 20, 2014

Sep 20, 2014: Wary Deer


Deer in the wetlands. 9/13/14 (LaDan Omidvar)

Sep 19, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #72

An Osprey floats above the park. 9/16/12 (Wolf Oesterreich)

Wednesday, September 10, 2014. 5:30-7:00 pm.
Cloudy, south wind, cool. Temperature 53 degrees F.

Jim Pease led a group of 12 on a birding program at the park. I brought my 12-year old grandson, Theo, from Des Moines. He has shown some interest in birds. Despite the cool and cloudy evening we saw some interesting birds. An adult Bald Eagle flew over the north lake as we were assembling near the shelter. Then an Osprey put on a show over the lake. It hovered several times and dove unsuccessfully for fish. Several small groups of Canada geese flew into the wetland west of the lake. We then walked up the upland trail towards Jensen’s Pond. Along the way we saw a Ring-necked Pheasant, an Eastern Kingbird, a Northern Cardinal and a Black-capped Chickadee. From the trail near the overlook, we could see the northern most wetland which had a small amount of standing water from the recent rains. The Canada Geese we saw earlier were there along with Wood Ducks, Mallards, and Blue-winged Teals, a Great Blue Heron, and an American Egret. Three Common Nighthawks flew over as we were standing on the trail. Jim explained how this species has declined in numbers in recent years. I recalled seeing hundreds of nighthawks during fall migration in Ames when I first moved here in 1975. I used to see them over campus in the summer time and knew that they nested on the gravel roofs of buildings such as McKay Hall. I haven’t seen a nighthawk on campus in years. As we returned to the parking lot a Green Heron flushed from the shoreline of the lake. I was pleased that Theo got to see most of these birds and helped me construct this list after arriving home.

I am a member of Ducks Unlimited. The recent issue of their magazine reported that nearly all species of ducks showed an increase in population surveys this summer. This is good news for birders as well as hunters.

I am pleased to report that a group called GAAR (Great Ames Area Race) uses the event to raise funds for Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park and the Emergency Residence Project. The Race is held at Hayden Park and consists of running, biking and canoeing. Last year they presented us with a check for about $800. This year, Rick Dietz one of the organizers, tells me the amount will exceed last year’s check. It will be presented at the park (north shelter) on Sept. 24, 5:30 pm. Everyone is welcome to attend and thank the group for their support.

Erv Kaas

Sep 18, 2014: Hayden Park News 22 & 23




Friends meet on the bridge. 8/30/14 (Kevin Kane)

Dear Friends:

This is a reminder that our friends from the Great Ames Area Race (GAAR) will be presenting us with a check from their fund raising event on our behalf. The presentation will be at the Ada Hayden shelter (north parking lot) on Wednesday evening, Sept. 24, at 5:30 pm. Everyone welcome.

For those who are concerned about global warming (aka climate change) there will be a screening of the film Disruption, which is about the People's Climate March, in New York City next Sunday. The film will be shown in the Cardinal room of the ISU Memorial Union at 2:00 pm. Following the film, the group will move to a rally at Welch and Lincoln Way at 3:30 pm. The event is called Climate Solidarity and is sponsored by the Ames Chapter, Citizens Climate Lobby and several student organizations.

See here for more information http://act.350.org/, and please let others in your circle know about it.

Erv Klaas
 ---
Dear Friends:

Sorry, in my last News article, I forgot to include tomorrow evening's event (Thursday, Sept. 18).

Tomorrow evening, the Friends of the Ada Hayden Heritage Park group is sponsoring the second annual Prairie Words – an open reading of prairie related literature in a slightly belated celebration of Iowa Prairie Heritage Week:

Prairie Words: Sharing Writings Related to Prairies
6 to 8 pm, Thursday, September 18th
Ada Hayden Heritage Park - meet at the shelter.
In celebration of Iowa Prairie Heritage Week, participants are asked to bring their favorite passage of prairie literature or a piece of original writing with a prairie focus (poems, lyrics, short essays or stories, etc.).
The weather is predicted to be nice, so we’ll likely take a short walk to read near one of the prairie areas -- dress accordingly. Bring a folding chair if you wish. The maximum length of each reading will be based on the number of readers present, but will probably be ~5 minutes. Please note that this is a family-friendly event.

Come to read or just to enjoy others' "prairie words"! For more information, contact Deb Lewis, dlewis@iastate.edu; 515-290-6736.

Erv Klaas

Sep 17, 2014: Let's Recreate!



The beautiful late summer weather has brought many outdoor enthusiasts out to the park in recent days. 8/30/14 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, September 17, 2014

Sep 16, 2014: Sunflower



Sunflower. 9/13/14 (LaDan Omidvar)
Studies in yellow #6...
(thanks to the person who planted these at Ada; they are gorgeous and constantly changing - getting a glimpse into Van Gogh's madness) - LaDan

Tuesday, September 16, 2014

Sep 15, 2014: Willow Sawfly Caterpillars



Willow Sawfly (Nematus ventralis) larvae are a common pest on willows (Salix spp.) and poplars (Populus spp.) in North America. Willow Sawfly is a non-stinging member of the wasp family (Tenthredinidae). Larvae appear similar to caterpillars, but have 6 or more prolegs (fleshy legs located behind the front 3 pairs of legs), while true caterpillars have no more than 4. These larvae were found feeding on a willow sapling next to the ramp located at the SW corner of the south lake's west bay. 9/14/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, September 15, 2014

Sunday, September 14, 2014

Sep 13, 2014: Grasses at Sunset



Several types of prairie grass blow in the wind at sunset in the northern prairie area. 8/30/14 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, September 13, 2014

Sep 12, 2014: Cloudy Lake



The clouds continued to pass by long after the rain had stopped. This composite photo is of a S-SE view across the north lake. 9/12/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sep 11, 2014: Bird Walk



Jim Pease presented a program about birds and birding. He showed the 12 participants how to properly adjust their binoculars, discussed field guides, and talked about local birds and habitats. Afterwards, we hiked up the Upland Trail and checked out the pools in the north wetland complex. 9/10/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday, September 12, 2014

Sep 10, 2014: Council moves ahead with northern growth development plans




 Master Plan (http://www.cityofames.org/modules/showdocument.aspx?documentid=18586)
 
Sep 10, 2014: City Council moves ahead with northern growth development plans

By Gavin Aronsen
Staff Writer
garonsen@amestrib.com

On the first of three readings, the Ames City Council approved the first rezoning of one of the northern growth area properties annexed last December at its meeting Tuesday night.

The property, owned by Friedrich Land Development LLC of Ames, occupies 79 acres between Ada Hayden Heritage Park to its immediate south and 190th Street to its north. Friedrich wants to build between 225 and 365 units of low- and medium-density housing units on the site.

After receiving assurances from city planners that the developer would take steps to protect Ada Hayden, including establishing a buffer zone along the lake — one of four agreed-upon conditions for building — the council voted unanimously to proceed with rezoning the property, which was previously used to grow beans and corn.

“We’re really excited about this project,” Friedrich said. “It’s a beautiful piece of property.

“We are as sensitive about caring about Ada Hayden as you are.”

(See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/city-council-moves-ahead-northern-growth-development-plans#sthash.wkpkawqW.dpuf)

Sep 9, 2014: Early Morning Mist



Early mist rises out of the middle and north wetland complexes. (Pond L in the foreground.) 9/7/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, September 9, 2014

Monday, September 8, 2014

Sep 7, 2014: The Great Ames Adventure Race (GAAR)



The Great Ames Adventure Race (GAAR) occurred this morning (9/7) and consists of three events (kayaking/canoeing [2.7 miles], biking [15 miles], & a 5K run). 9/7/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sep 6, 2014: Nightfall



The camera flash lights up the AHHP sign after sunset on a quiet walk around the park. 8/31/14 (Kevin Kane)

Sunday, September 7, 2014

Sep 5, 2014: Sunflower at Sunset



A moth flies toward an illuminated sunflower at dusk on the east shore of the north lake. 8/30/14 (Kevin Kane)

Friday, September 5, 2014

Sep 4, 2014: Sunset



Ada sunset from the path at the southeast corner of the south lake.  9/1/14 (Gregg Hadish)

Thursday, September 4, 2014

Sep 3, 2014: Wolf's August 2014 Wildlife Report



One of the first Monarch caterpillars that I have seen this season was feeding on a Common Milkweed (on the day of the Tyler's butterfly talk). 8/28/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 86 avian species (plus 1 sp.) was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 6th highest (tied with 2011) August among 17 years of records.

Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the 11 American White Pelicans on the 6th may represent a new extreme early Fall record for Story County (former record set on 10 Aug 2005 at Ada Hayden Heritage Park).  The 2 Chestnut-sided Warblers on the 13th may also set a new extreme early Fall record (former record set on 14 Aug 1986 at Brookside Park).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 53rd Supplement (2012) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 12th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-20, 27 (1), 28-29, 30-31 (1)
     WOOD DUCK: 1-10, 13-19, 21-31
     MALLARD: 1-31
     GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 11 (4)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1, 3, 8, 11, 13-14, 17, 19-22, 25, 27, 29
     PIED-BILLED GREBE: 8 (1)
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 28 (1)
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 6 (11)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (14), 2 (17), 3 (18), 4 (12), 5 (17), 6 (10), 7 (8), 8 (5), 9 (11),
                                    10-11 (8), 12 (9), 13 (13), 14 (15), 15 (16), 16 (15), 17 (10), 18 (14), 19 (9),
                                    20 (14), 21 (8), 22-23 (4), 24 (9), 25 (4), 26 (7), 27 (4), 28 (13), 29 (9), 30 (13),
                                    31 (11)
     GREAT EGRET: 1 (4), 2 (3), 3-4 (4), 5 (5), 6 (4), 7-9 (5), 10 (4), 11-12 (7), 13 (6), 14 (7), 15 (8),
                                    16-19 (7), 20 (3), 21 (4), 24 (3), 26 (2), 27 (7), 28 (5), 29 (8), 30 (9), 31 (10)
     GREEN HERON: 4 (1), 14 (1), 15 (3), 16 (2), 18 (1), 20 (2), 23 (1), 24 (2), 25-26 (4), 27-30 (1)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 2 (4), 3 (1), 5 (2), 7-8 (1), 11 (3), 12-13 (1), 15-16 (1), 18 (2), 19 (1), 21 (3),
                                    24-25 (1), 26 (6), 28-30 (1), 31 (3)
     OSPREY: 8 (1), 14-15 (1), 17 (1), 22 (1), 27-28 (1), 31 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 3 (1 ad), 7 (1 ad), 29 (1 ad), 31 (1 ad)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 18-19 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 2 (1), 3 (2), 4-5 (1), 13 (1), 16-17 (1), 19 (1), 22 (2), 26 (1), 27 (2), 29-30 (1)
     KILLDEER: 1-19, 21-22, 25, 29
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 (2), 2 (3), 3 (1), 4 (2), 5 (1), 7 (1), 8 (2), 10 (2), 11 (4), 12 (2), 13-15 (1),
                                    16-17 (2), 27 (1), 29 (1)
     SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 1 (3), 2 (5), 3 (3), 4 (9), 5 (4), 7 (5), 8-10 (6), 11 (12), 13 (3), 14 (1), 16 (3),
                                    17-18 (1), 26 (1)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 13-14 (1), 17 (2), 18 (1)
     LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 9 (1), 12-14 (1), 16 (3), 17 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 1 (5), 2 (9), 3 (8), 4 (4), 5 (7), 7 (2), 9 (3), 10 (5), 11 (3), 12 (1), 13 (3),
                                    14 (1), 16-18 (1)
     LEAST SANDPIPER: 1 (3), 2 (2), 3 (1)
     PECTORAL SANDPIPER: 1 (7), 2 (1), 3 (3), 4 (13), 5 (3), 7-8 (2), 9 (1), 10 (2), 11 (5), 12 (2), 13 (4),
                                    14-15 (1)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 19 (1)
     CASPIAN TERN: 27 (6)
     FORSTER’S TERN: 3 (4), 25 (2), 28 (6)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-5, 7-10, 13-31
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 5, 10, 14, 17, 20
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 2 (1♀), 5 (1♀), 15 (1♀), 18 (1♀), 23 (2), 27 (2)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 3 (1♂), 4 (1), 12-13 (1), 15 (1), 17 (2), 24 (1), 26 (1), 30 (1)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 16, 27, 29
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1, 5-6, 8, 12-14, 16-17, 23, 25-27, 29
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 3, 27-28
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 22 (1)
     OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 23-24 (1), 27-28 (1)
     EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 3-4 (1), 7 (1), 9, 15 (2), 17 (1), 23 (1), 27 (2)
     YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER: 28 (1)
     LEAST FLYCATCHER: 25 (1), 28-30 (1)
     Empidonax sp.: 15 (1), 19 (3), 24 (1), 25 (3), 27 (3), 28 (1), 29 (4), 30 (5), 31 (1)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 22 (1)
     GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 18 (1 im), 20 (1), 28-29 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 1 (3), 2 (1), 3 (2), 4-6 (1), 7-8 (3), 10 (3), 12 (1), 15-16 (1), 17 (4), 20 (3),
                                    21 (1), 22 (2), 25-26 (1), 27 (2), 28-30 (1), 31 (3)
     WARBLING VIREO: 1-2, 9, 16, 27-28, 29 (2), 30 (1)
     PHILADELPHIA VIREO: 29 (1)
     RED-EYED VIREO: 25-27 (3), 28-29 (4), 30 (3), 31 (1)
     BLUE JAY: 1-5, 7-10, 12-14, 16-17, 20-24, 26-28, 30-31
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-31
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-19, 21-24, 31 (2)
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 28
     BANK SWALLOW: 2, 6, 26
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 1, 3, 9, 11, 16, 20, 22, 26, 29-31
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-31
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-7, 9-23, 25-31
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 2, 5, 17, 23
     HOUSE WREN: 1-8, 10-11, 13-16, 19, 22-23, 25-27, 30-31
     SEDGE WREN: 1-27, 29
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 20 (2), 22 (1), 28-30
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 1, 3, 6, 8-10, 12-14, 16-18, 20, 22-30
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 4-6, 19, 23, 25, 27-31
     CEDAR WAXWING: 12 (2), 16 (1), 19 (1), 21 (1), 24 (5), 26 (8), 27 (9+), 28 (3), 29 (5), 30 (3)
     OVENBIRD: 29 (1)
     NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH: 13 (1), 19 (1)
     GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER: 27 (1), 29 (1)
     BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 27 (1), 29-30 (1)
     ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 27 (1)
     MOURNING WARBLER: 25 (1)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-11, 13-14, 16-17, 19-20, 22, 28 (2), 29
     AMERICAN REDSTART: 27 (1), 29 (1)
     YELLOW WARBLER: 20 (1)
     CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER: 13 (2), 25 (2), 27 (1), 29 (1)
     CANADA WARBLER: 25 (1), 29-30 (1)
     WILSON’S WARBLER: 25 (1), 27 (1), 30 (1)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-2, 10, 13, 15, 19-20, 22, 24, 27
     SONG SPARROW: 1-31
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-10, 12-16, 18-31
     ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 16 (2)
     INDIGO BUNTING: 1, 3-4, 8-9, 15-16, 18
     DICKCISSEL: 10 (1♂)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-16, 18-24
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 7 (1)
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 20 (1)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 18 (1♂), 20 (1), 25 (1), 27 (2), 28, 30
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-4, 7-10, 23-26, 29
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-31

MAMMALIAN
     AMERICAN MINK: 8 (1)
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 2 (1), 7 (1♀ w/2 fawns), 8 (2♀, each w/1 fawn), 11 (1♀ w/2 older fawns),
                                    15 (1♀ w/1 fawn), 19 (1), 20 (1♀ w/2 fawns), 21 (1♀ w/1 fawn), 22 (1 fawn, 1♀,
                                    1♀ w/2 fawns, 1♀ w/1 fawn), 25 (2 fawns), 28 (3♀ & 2 fawns), 29 (1♀ w/2 fawns)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 3-5, 10, 15-17, 19-20, 27-29
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 10, 17
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 1, 4-5, 8-10, 13, 16, 19, 25-27, 29
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-30

REPTILIAN
     Garter Snake sp.: 18 (1), 28 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-7, 9-14, 16-31
     RED-EARED SLIDER: 28 (1)
     WESTERN SPINY SOFTSHELL: 12 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 1, 5, 8, 10, 14, 16-17, 21
     EASTERN GRAY TREE FROG: 28-29
     AMERICAN BULLFROG: 1-5, 8, 10-14, 16-22, 24-25
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 3, 9, 13, 15, 17, 19, 26, 31

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 4-5, 9-10, 12, 14-22, 24-25, 27, 29-30
     GIANT SWALLOWTAIL: 3 (1)
     EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 1-5, 8-22, 24, 26, 28-31
     CHECKERED WHITE: 2 (1)
     CABBAGE WHITE: 1, 3-5, 8-12, 14, 16-22, 24-31
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 1-4, 8-13, 16, 19, 21-22, 24-25, 27, 29
     LITTLE YELLOW: 24, 27-30
     Sulphur sp.: 1-5, 7-10, 13-14, 16-19, 22-23, 27, 29-30
     EASTERN TAILED BLUE: 1-5, 8-10, 12-14, 16, 19-30
     SUMMER AZURE: 8
     AMERICAN SNOUT: 8 (1), 26 (1)
     GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY: 29 (1)
     PEARL CRESCENT: 8, 11-12, 14, 16-19, 21, 24-30
     QUESTION MARK: 2, 8, 10, 29 (1)
     MOURNING CLOAK: 4 (2)
     PAINTED LADY: 17, 20, 22-23, 25-26, 28-30
     RED ADMIRAL: 1, 8-9, 11, 13, 16-17, 19-20, 22-28
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 9-10, 17, 24, 26, 29-30
     RED-SPOTTED PURPLE: 9-10, 13, 17, 25-27
     VICEROY: 1-2, 4-5, 8-13, 16-25, 27, 29-31
     MONARCH: 1-5, 7-14, 16-22, 24-31
     LEAST SKIPPER: 2-3, 5, 8-10, 13-14, 16-17, 24, 30-31
     FIERY SKIPPER: 29
     Skipper sp.: 26, 29
     DOGBANE SAUCROBOTYS: 14, 16-18
     CHICKWEED GEOMETER: 7-9, 11, 14, 20, 22, 26-30
     WHITE-LINED SPHINX: 26
     Sphinx sp.: 27
     VIRGINIAN TIGER MOTH: 28
     OLIVE-SHADED BIRD-DROPPING MOTH: 22 (1)


ODONATA
     SLENDER SPREADWING: 4, 11
     LYRE-TIPPED SPREADWING: 25 (1♀)
     Spreadwing sp.: 5, 14, 18
     BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 1-5, 8-14, 16-19, 21-22, 24-30
     POWDERED DANCER: 1, 4, 18-19, 21, 26
     RAINBOW BLUET: 1
     DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 1, 11, 18, 24-25, 27-28, 31
     TULE BLUET: 1, 3-4, 9, 11, 13-14, 18, 21, 29
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 1-2, 4-5, 8-14, 17-19, 21-22, 24-26
     STREAM BLUET: 1, 4-5, 9
     SKIMMING BLUET: 5, 24
     ORANGE BLUET: 8, 11, 13, 21, 24
     Bluet sp.: 1-2, 4-5, 9, 11, 13, 17-19, 25-26, 29
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1-5, 8-14, 16, 18-19, 21-22, 24-31
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1-5, 7-10, 12-14, 16-31
     JADE CLUBTAIL: 4 (1), 8 (1), 12 (1), 14 (1), 18 (1)
     FLAG-TAILED SPINYLEG: 1 (1), 12-13 (1), 17 (1), 19 (2), 22 (1), 25 (2), 26 (1), 29 (1)
     PRINCE BASKETTAIL: 1, 3-5, 10-12, 14, 17-19, 25-27, 30
     HALLOWEEN PENNANT: 1-5, 8-10, 12-14, 17-19, 31 (2)
     EASTERN PONDHAWK: 1-2, 4, 8-9, 11-14, 16, 19, 24, 27, 29
     WIDOW SKIMMER: 1-5, 8-14, 16-19, 21-22, 24-30
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 2, 4-5, 8-12, 16, 19, 22, 25, 28
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 1-5, 8-9, 11-14, 17-19
     BLUE DASHER: 1-3, 14, 17, 19, 24
     WANDERING GLIDER: 1, 3-4, 8, 12, 18-19, 21, 29-30
     EASTERN AMBERWING: 1-2, 4-5, 8-9, 11-14, 16-19, 21-22
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 4-5, 28, 31
     SAFFRON-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 3 (1♂)
     WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 12-14, 18, 21-22, 24-27, 30-31
     RUBY MEADOWHAWK: 5 (1♀), 12
     BAND-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 1-3, 5, 8-10, 13-14, 17, 21, 26-27, 29-31
     Meadowhawk sp.: 9, 19, 24-25, 27-29, 31
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 1-2, 8-11, 13, 17-18, 24, 28, 30-31
     RED SADDLEBAGS: 2

ORTHOPTERA
            CAROLINA GRASSHOPPER: 1-4, 8-14, 16-22, 24-31




Wolf. Oesterreich

Tuesday, September 2, 2014

Sep 2, 2014: Great Blue Heron



This Great Blue Heron (1 of 7 at the Park) was found at Pond J (just west of the south lake's west bay). [A digiscoped photo - point-and-shoot camera through a spotting scope.] 8/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, September 1, 2014