Saturday, May 31, 2014

May 31, 2014: May 2014 Photo Collage



May 2014 photos from the blog by Wolf. Oesterreich, Kevin Kane, and LaDan Omidvar.

May 30, 2014: Birds on the Roof



From LaDan's album "Birds of Ada 2." 5/28/14(LaDan Omidvar)

May 29, 2014: Beautiful Evening



The recent nice weather has brought many visitors to the park because of inviting scenes like this panorama of the north shore of the north lake looking south. 5/21/14 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, May 29, 2014

Wednesday, May 28, 2014

May 27, 2014: Stop. Look. Listen. Linger.




Gravel trail to the bluff, looking north. 5/3/14 (Kevin Kane)

Recently (5/15/14) our AHHP Friend Todd Burras wrote an entry for his Ames Tribune "Naturally Speaking" blog.  Here is an excerpt...

Eyes on the Sky: Taking time to take it easy on local trails


Stop. Look. Listen. Linger.
That’s been our approach to traversing the trails around Ada Hayden Heritage Park this spring in search of bird life.
It goes something like this: Stop more frequently. Look closer, often with the aid of binoculars. Listen harder for distinctive calls and songs as well as those we can’t yet differentiate (which is a lot). Linger longer to soak in the moment and allow nature’s balm to work its miraculous and recuperative magic on weary bodies, minds and spirits.
- See more at: http://amestrib.com/sports/outdoors/eyes-sky-taking-time-take-it-easy-local-trails#sthash.H8PlnCDv.dpuf

Eyes on the Sky: Taking time to take it easy on local trails


Stop. Look. Listen. Linger.
That’s been our approach to traversing the trails around Ada Hayden Heritage Park this spring in search of bird life.
It goes something like this: Stop more frequently. Look closer, often with the aid of binoculars. Listen harder for distinctive calls and songs as well as those we can’t yet differentiate (which is a lot). Linger longer to soak in the moment and allow nature’s balm to work its miraculous and recuperative magic on weary bodies, minds and spirits.
- See more at: http://amestrib.com/sports/outdoors/eyes-sky-taking-time-take-it-easy-local-trails#sthash.H8PlnCDv.dpuf

Eyes on the Sky: Taking time to take it easy on local trails


Stop. Look. Listen. Linger.
That’s been our approach to traversing the trails around Ada Hayden Heritage Park this spring in search of bird life.
It goes something like this: Stop more frequently. Look closer, often with the aid of binoculars. Listen harder for distinctive calls and songs as well as those we can’t yet differentiate (which is a lot). Linger longer to soak in the moment and allow nature’s balm to work its miraculous and recuperative magic on weary bodies, minds and spirits.
- See more at: http://amestrib.com/sports/outdoors/eyes-sky-taking-time-take-it-easy-local-trails#sthash.H8PlnCDv.dpuf
Stop. Look. Listen. Linger.

That’s been our approach to traversing the trails around Ada Hayden Heritage Park this spring in search of bird life.

It goes something like this: Stop more frequently. Look closer, often with the aid of binoculars. Listen harder for distinctive calls and songs as well as those we can’t yet differentiate (which is a lot). Linger longer to soak in the moment and allow nature’s balm to work its miraculous and recuperative magic on weary bodies, minds and spirits.

More of Todd's article can be found at http://amestrib.com/sports/outdoors/eyes-sky-taking-time-take-it-easy-local-trails

Tuesday, May 27, 2014

May 26, 2014: Spring Green



The colors of spring are highlighted at sunset on the northern hills. 5/26/14 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, May 26, 2014

May 25, 2014: Storm over AHHP



Sunday night's brief storm moved over the park with some menacing clouds and eerie light but with little rain. 5/25/14 (Kevin Kane)

May 24, 2014: Busy Days



The park was alive with lots of activity this week with the beautiful weather.  This view from Wednesday evening looking south from the fishing pier shows paddlers, fishers, rock skippers, walkers, and rollerbladers all in one photo. 5/21/14 (Kevin Kane)

May 23, 2014: Brown and Blue



The recent rain probably caused soil to flow into the main lakes.  On Wednesday, 5/21, the north lake was quite turbid, while the south lake remained clear, as seen in the photograph.  It would appear that the netting to keep the trout in the north  lake has also helped to contain the turbidity. 5/21/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 22, 2014: Ruby-throated Hummingbird


 This male Ruby-throated Hummingbird was flitting about a non-native honeysuckle bush at the bluff area.  (When the sun hit just right, the red gorget was absolutely brilliant!).  The wings were beating so fast that they are barely visible. 5/18/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 21, 2014: Northslope



An eastward view along the north slope on a dreary day. 5/20/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, May 22, 2014

May 20, 2014: Canada Goose Family



This Canada Goose family was found on the north lake.  (A week earlier I had seen a family with 6 goslings.  Then I didn't see them again.  I wonder if this is the same family, minus two?)  Another family with only 2 goslings was observed on Pond G.  Several adult pairs without goslings have been seen all around the Park. 5/17/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 19, 2014: Hayden Park News 12

Playing on the northwest hills.  5/21/14 (Kevin Kane)

May 19, 2014

Dear Friends Of Hayden Park:
The day-time temperatures are warming up, the birds are migrating and it is time to plant more trees. Rick Hall plans to have a tractor and tree planter available on Thursday morning, May 22. The weather forecast includes a 20 percent chance of rain. If the forecast worsens, Rick may move this event to Wednesday morning otherwise it is on. We will be planting another 700 trees next to last year’s plantings which are doing fairly well despite last year’s dry summer and a cold winter. Please come and help as you can. Bring a long a lopper if you have one to cut some Siberian elm saplings. The planting area is located along the upland trail northwest of the shelter and the north lake. 


Dr. Thelma Heidel-Baker, Post-doctoral research associate in the Department of Entomology will be conducting a study on native bee conservation in Iowa prairies. She is interested in providing artificial nests for native bees to enhance conservation of these important pollinators. Native bees are important pollinators that are not well studied here in Iowa. She has designed a simple bee nesting tube and plans to place these in various prairies around Story County. At each prairie I will be setting out 12-16 of these small nesting tubes. These tubes will be set up in the spring (early May) and removed in the fall (October). There will be minimal other contact with these tubes during the season. The results of this study will be used to enhance our knowledge on native bee conservation and help develop conservation tools for the public on pollinators. Ada Hayden Heritage Park will serve as one of her study sites. She wishes to share information on this project with the Friends of Ada Hayden. A large component of this project is public education as well and making people more aware of this less known group of pollinating insects. We will be looking forward to hearing the results of this study next fall. 

Dr. Robert Klaver, Leader of the Iowa Cooperative Fish and Wildlife Research Unit at ISU has taken over the Tree Swallow study from David and Carol Vleck who retired and moved to Arizona.

For daily information and photos of the park go to: http://adahaydenpark.blogspot.com/

Erv Klaas 

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

May 18, 2014: Great Crested Flycatcher



Normally found in open woods, this Great Crested Flycatcher was foraging amongst short vegetation to the east of the bridge. 5/16/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

May 17, 2014: Lone Goose



A lone Canada Goose stands in the central wetland complex.  LaDan Omidvar.

Monday, May 19, 2014

May 16, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #66


The Red-winged Blackbirds are easy to spot right now on any walk through the park. These three were photographed near wetland H in the southwest part of the park. 5/13/13 (Kevin Kane)

May 16, 2014. 1:30-3:30 PM. Sunny, hazy, no wind, temperature 55 degrees F.

Parked in the southwest lot and walked to the bluff area and back. I saw a white-tail doe and quite a few birds. The first bird I saw at the parking lot was a Savanna Sparrow which looks a lot like a Song Sparrow but with lots of yellow on the face and head. Two pairs of Canada Geese and a pair of Mallards were in the nearby pond.

Along the path I saw: Song Sparrows, Chimney Swift, Tree Swallow, Red-winged Blackbird (many), Common Grackle, Yellow Warbler, Robin, Great Blue Heron, Blue-winged Teal (pair). At the bluff area I looked for the White-eyed Vireo that Wolf Oesterreich reported seeing yesterday but I didn’t find it. He also saw a Blue-winged Warbler in this area recently. Both are new records for the park. I saw four thrushes feeding on unripe mulberrys. I first identified these as Gray-cheeked Thrushes but Wolf (who I met on the trail) convinced me they were Swainson’s Thrushes. Then, after I got home and checked my field guides I think they were Veerys. Hopefully Wolf can find these later and confirm the identification. While we were standing talking on the trail, we spotted a female Baltimore Oriole enter a nest in the tree above us.

Erv Klaas

May 15, 2014: Wetlands



A NW and N view across Pool F towards the highlands while light rain fell. 5/15/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)


Sunday, May 18, 2014

Wednesday, May 14, 2014

May 12, 2014: Northern Painted Turtle



This little youngster Northern Painted Turtle was crossing the lakes trail, near the mini-shelter at the NW corner of teh south lake.  I picked it up and moved it off the trail. 5/9/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, May 13, 2014

May 11, 2014: Green Heron




This adult Green Heron was found at Pond L, near dusk. 5/4/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, May 12, 2014

May 10, 2014: Black-necked Stilts





Black-necked Stilts. 5/4/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This morning (5/4), just after I had finished reading Sunday's newspapers and before heading out onto the trails I received a call from Mark Carson.  He had found 2 Black-necked Stilts in the north wetland complex.  I rushed over to the area and found him by the bench, just east of Pool C.  We had to stand on the bench to see the birds to the west and there were actually 3 birds.  [The digiscoped photograph shows 2 of the 3.]  It has been almost 10 years  (15 May 2004) since the last time I saw this species at the Park.  Unfortunately, shortly after Mark left, the stilts and the ducks flushed from the pool when an Osprey flew over.  The Osprey eats fish so these birds had nothing to fear.  All 3 stilts flew off to the north.

Later. in the early afternoon, while I was talking with Todd Burras (Ames Tribune), his daughter Elizabeth spotted the first Canada Goose family on the north lake.  At least 6 small goslings followed their parents.

Warblers are showing up and I recorded the following today: Ovenbird, Northern Waterthrush, Black-and-white Warbler, Nashville Warbler, Yellow Warbler, Palm Warbler, and Yellow-rumped Warbler.

Wolf. Oesterreich

May 9, 2014: Biking the Bridge


Bicyclists on the bridge, looking west. 5/6/14 (Kevin Kane)

Friday, May 9, 2014

May 8, 2014: American Lady



The American Lady butterfly is very similar to the Painted Lady, but not as numerous in our area. They migrate to and temporarily colonize the northern United States and southern Canada, but are resident in the southern United States. 5/3/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, May 8, 2014

May 7, 2014: Red-necked Grebe



This is the first time (1 May) that I have seen more than one Red-necked Grebe at the same time.  They have been recorded in 4 years since the Park's creation.  Red-necked Grebes (20") are larger than  than the more numerous and common Pied-billed Grebes (13.5") and Horned Grebes (13.5"). 5/1/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

May 6, 2014: Fox Squirrel



This Fox Squirrel was just hanging around in the savannah woods (SE corner of Park). 5/2/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, May 6, 2014

May 5, 2014: Great Blue Heron



At least 5 Great Blue Herons were observed on the 1st of May.  This one took flight from the SW corner of the south lake. 5/1/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, May 5, 2014

May 4, 2014: Loons




Only for the second time (first, last November) I observed a Red-throated Loon at the Park.  The winter-plumaged individual was found on the north lake on the 29th, in the company of 7 Common Loons (1 winter-plumaged & 6 breeding-plumaged).  The Red-throated Loon is smaller than the Common Loon.  This digiscoped photograph also shows the smaller, rounded head and the thinner bill held at a slight upward angle.  An adult Common Loon is in the background. 4/29/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sunday, May 4, 2014

May 3, 2014: April Showers Fill the Wetlands



The wetlands are filling up with April's showers.  Looking west from the paved trail. 5/3/14 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, May 3, 2014

May 2, 2014: Ring-billed Gull



This first-cycle Ring-billed Gull was one of three found at the north lake's fishing pier.  Ten Bonaparte's Gulls were also in the area. 4/29/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, May 1, 2014

May 1, 2014: Wolf's April Wildlife Report



Belted Kingfishers are common throughout the US.  Both sexes have the slate blue breast band, but only the female has the rust belly band.  This female was perched on a post by the boat dock while light rain fell.  [A digiscoped photo.] 4/29/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 110 avian species (plus 4 sp.) was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 4th highest April among 17 years of records.  April 2013 with 122 species remains as the highest April.  So far, a total of 119 species have been recorded this year (18 species behind 2013).

Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the Red-throated Loon on the 29th is only the second record for Story County.  The 3 Semipalmated Sandpipers on the 1st may represent a new extreme early Spring record (former record set on 13 April 1988 at Hendrickson Marsh).  The Least Flycatchers on the 27th tie the current extreme early Spring record set in 1981 at Ames.  The single Northern Shrike on the 1st may represent a new extreme late Spring record (former record set on 26 march 2004 in my backyard).  The 2 Clay-colored Sparrows found on the 22nd may also represent a new extreme early Spring record (former record set on 24 April 1991 at Ames).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 54th Supplement (2013) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 13th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE: 11 (1), 12 (~50)
     CACKLING GOOSE: 2 (1)
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-30
     WOOD DUCK: 6 (4), 22 (1♂), 26 (1♂ + 1♀)
     GADWALL: 1 (13+), 4 (2♂ + 1♀), 5 (7+), 6 (11♂ + 6♀), 8-9 (1♂), 10 (200+), 11, 12 (13), 14 (1♂),
                                    15 (22), 17-18 (8), 19 (4), 20 (14), 21 (3)
     AMERICAN WIGEON: 1 (3♂ + 1♀), 2 (1♂ + 1♀), 4 (2♂ + 2♀), 10 (9+), 20 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-30
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1 (9+), 2 (20), 3, 4 (~10), 6 (8), 7, 8 (4), 10 (15+), 11, 12 (6), 14, 15 (5),
                                    16 (13), 17 (18+), 18 (10), 19 (6+), 20 (18+), 21 (27+), 22 (20+), 23, 24 (30+),
                                    25 (7), 26 (44+), 27 (46+), 28 (21+), 29 (96+), 30
     NORTHERN SHOVELER: 1 (3♂ + 2♀), 2 (33+), 3 (17), 4 (10+), 5 (19+), 6 (32), 7 (14♂ + 8♀), 8 (16),
                                    9 (9), 10 (110+), 11, 12 (16+), 14 (50+), 15 (90+), 16 (11♂ + 10♀), 17 (104+),
                                    18 (19+), 19 (31+), 20 (46+), 21 (29+), 22 (125+), 23, 24 (65+), 25 (89+),
                                    26 (48+), 27 (28+), 28 (26+), 29 (28+), 30 (81+)
     NORTHERN PINTAIL: 6 (1♂)
     GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 1 (100+), 2, 4 (2♂ + 2♀), 5 (3♂ + 3♀), 9 (3), 10 (13+), 11, 12, 14 (4), 15,
                                    16 (2♂ + 2♀), 17 (20+), 18 (32+), 19 (2), 21 (6), 22 (12+), 24 (4), 26 (5+), 27 (2),
                                    28 (1)
     CANVASBACK: 2 (2♂ + 1♀), 4-6 (1♂), 8-9 (1♂), 14 (1♂)
     REDHEAD: 4 (2♂ + 2♀), 7 (10), 8 (3), 14 (4), 15 (1♂)
     RING-NECKED DUCK: 1 (6♂ + 3♀), 2 (24+), 4 (12+), 5 (10+), 7 (20+), 8, 9 (~15), 10 (20+), 11, 14 (5),
                                    15 (20+), 17 (8)
     LESSER SCAUP: 1 (80+), 2 (89+), 3, 4 (~150), 6 (10), 7 (1♂ + 1♀), 8, 10 (24+), 11, 12 (4), 13,
                                    14 (21+), 15 (300+), 17 (25+), 18 (11), 20 (1♂), 22 (1♂ + 1♀), 23 (2♂ + 1♀),
                                    24-26 (1♂), 27 (1♂ + 2♀)
     BUFFLEHEAD: 1 (20+), 2 (13+), 3 (17), 4 (10+), 5 (16+), 6 (8), 7 (1♂), 8 (7♂ + 5♀), 9 (5+), 10 (15+),
                                    12 (4), 13, 14 (28+), 15 (1♂), 16 (2♂ + 3♀), 17 (4♂ + 2♀), 18 (1♂ + 1♀)
     COMMON GOLDENEYE: 1 (1♂), 4 (1♀)
     HOODED MEGANSER: 1 (1♂ + 1♀), 3 (2), 5 (6+), 8 (5♂ + 1♀), 10 (2♀), 15 (1♂ + 1♀), 24 (7♂ + 1♀),
                                    29 (2♀)
     COMMON MERGANSER: 1 (3♂ + 2♀)
     RED-BREASTED MERGANSER: 1 (1♂), 6 (7♂ + 2♀), 17 (1♂ + 1♀), 25 (1♀), 30 (1♂)
     RUDDY DUCK: 1 (7), 5 (12), 7 (11), 11 (11+), 12 (8), 13, 14 (12), 15 (1♂), 17 (308+), 22 (13), 26 (11),
                                    28 (2)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1-12, 13 (1♂ BY), 14-30
     RED-THROATED LOON: 29 (1 anb)
     COMMON LOON: 8 (4), 9 (3), 10-12 (4), 14-15 (4), 16 (2), 17 (1), 18 (2), 19 (1), 20 (2), 21 (1), 28 (1),
                                    29 (6 abp + 1 anb), 30 (3 abp)
     PIED-BILLED GREBE: 2 (4), 3 (5), 4 (1), 5 (5), 6 (6), 7 (3), 8 (2), 9 (3), 10 (8), 11 (1), 12 (3), 13 (2),
                                    14 (13), 15 (5), 16 (2), 17 (21), 18 (9), 19 (14), 20 (8), 21 (1), 22-23 (7), 24 (30),
                                    25 (6), 26 (20), 27 (19), 28 (5), 29 (3), 30
     HORNED GREBE: 8 (4), 9-10 (3), 11 (1), 12 (2), 14 (2), 15 (3), 16 (2), 17 (5), 18 (26), 19 (2), 21 (1),
                                    22 (2), 23-25 (1), 26-30 (2)
     EARED GREBE: 17-18 (2), 19 (1)
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 9 (3), 11 (4), 14 (7), 20 (21), 21 (4), 22 (1)
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 1 (26), 7 (34+), 9 (16), 20 (2), 28 (13)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (1), 2 (3), 3-4 (1), 5 (2), 6-8 (1), 10-12 (1), 14 (1), 15 (3), 17-18 (1), 19 (3),
                                    22-24 (1), 26 (1), 29-30 (1)
     GREAT EGRET: 10 (1), 12 (1), 18 (1), 29 (8)
     GREEN HERON: 22 (1), 25 (2), 26 (1), 28 (1)
     BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: 18 (1 ad)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 2 (7), 4 (2), 5 (1), 6 (3), 8 (9+), 9 (5+), 10 (8+), 12 (4+), 14 (5+), 15 (4), 16 (7),
                                    17 (4), 18 (7), 19 (3), 20 (2), 21 (7), 22 (6), 24 (7+), 26 (8), 27 (2), 29 (5), 30
     OSPREY: 5 (1), 7-8 (1), 10 (2), 11-12 (1), 14 (1), 15 (4), 16 (3), 17-19 (2), 24 (1), 26-28 (1), 29 (4),
                                    30 (2)
     BALD EAGLE: 2 (1 im), 4-5 (1 ad), 7-8 (1 ad), 11 (1 ad), 13-14 (1 ad), 17 (1 ad), 22-24 (1 ad),
                                    26 (1 ad)
     NORTHERN HARRIER: 14 (1 brown + 1♂)
     SHARP-SHINNED HAWK: 26 (1 ad)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 1 (1 im + 1 ad), 2 (1), 10 (1 ad BY), 12 (1), 15 (1), 16 (2), 19-20 (1), 23 (1), 28 (1)
     Accipiter sp.: 5 (1)
     BROAD-WINGED HAWK: 27 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1-3 (1), 4 (3), 5-8 (1), 9 (2), 10-11 (1), 12 (2), 14-19 (1), 20-21 (2), 22-24 (1),
                                    25 (2), 26 (1), 27 (2), 28 (1), 29 (2), 30 (1)
     Buteo sp.: 6 (1)
     AMERICAN COOT: 1 (15), 2 (64), 3 (57), 4 (50+), 5 (61), 6 (44), 7, 8 (30), 9 (25), 10 (124+), 11,
                                    12 (23), 13 (500+), 14 (300+), 15 (380+), 16 (41+), 17 (142+), 18 (77), 19 (34+),
                                    20, 21 (58), 22 (37+), 23, 24 (27+), 25 (30+), 26 (15+), 27 (14+), 28 (25+),
                                    29 (26+), 30
     KILLDEER: 1-3 (1), 4 (6), 5 (3), 6 (2), 8 (1), 10 (1), 12 (3), 14 (2), 15-16 (1), 18 (1), 24 (4), 25 (1),
                                    27-28 (1), 29 (2)
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 26 (1), 27 (2), 28 (1), 29 (3), 30 (1)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 29 (1)
     LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 16 (2), 24 (1), 27 (3)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 1 (3), 16 (7)
     PECTORAL SANDPIPER: 16 (1)
     Sandpiper sp.: 4 (1)
     WILSON’S SNIPE: 12 (1), 14 (2)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 1 (50+), 2 (1), 5 (1), 6 (26+), 9 (1), 12 (2), 14 (2), 16 (10), 18-19 (1), 20 (7),
                                    23 (30+), 25 (1), 26 (2), 28 (7), 29 (3)
     FRANKLIN’S GULL: 24 (10)
     BONAPARTE’S GULL: 17 (1), 29 (10)
     Gull sp.: 5-6, 24 (2)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-2, 4-30
     GREAT HORNED OWL: 14 (1)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 8 (1), 15 (1), 24 (1), 29 (2♀)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 1, 8-10, 19, 25, 27, 30
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1-12, 14, 16-17, 19-20, 22-30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 3, 5, 8
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1-2 (1), 4 (1), 5 (3), 6 (2), 7 (1), 8 (2), 9-10 (4), 11-12 (2),
                                    14 (7+), 15-16 (4), 17 (2), 18 (6), 19 (1), 20-21, 22-23 (1), 24 (5), 25 (2), 27 (1),
                                    29 (3), 30
     AMERICAN KESTREL: 27 (1), 29 (1♂)
     MERLIN: 29 (1)
     LEAST FLYCATCHER: 27 (1 BY + 1)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 1 (1), 3 (2), 6 (1), 8 (1), 8 (1), 9 (3), 12 (1)
     NORTHERN SHRIKE: 1 (1)
     BLUE-HEADED VIREO: 27 (1)
     BLUE JAY: 2-6, 11-15, 17, 19, 25, 28
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-10, 12-30
     PURPLE MARTIN: 10 (1), 11, 12 (6), 14 (5), 15 (1), 17 (3), 18 (5), 19 (6), 20-30
     TREE SWALLOW: 6 (15+), 8 (20+), 9-12, 16-30
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 16 (1), 23 (1), 24, 26-30
     BANK SWALLOW: 27 (2+), 28-29
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 28-29
     BARN SWALLOW: 21 (1), 23 (3+), 24, 26-30
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-30
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 1-2, 4-7, 9-12, 15-17, 19-26
     BROWN CREEPER: 1 (1), 3 (1), 10 (1), 14 (1)
     GOLDEN-CROWNED KINGLET: 9 (1 BY)
     RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET: 10 (2), 12 (1), 14 (2), 15 (3), 16 (4), 17-19 (3), 20 (9), 22 (4), 23 (3),
                                    24 (9), 25 (8), 26 (2), 27 (7), 28-29 (1)
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 (2), 4 (3♂ + 3♀), 6 (1♂ + 1♀), 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 18 (1♂), 22 (1♂), 30 (1♂ + 1♀)
     SWAINSON’S THRUSH: 22 (1)
     HERMIT THRUSH: 9 (1), 14 (2), 15 (1), 17 (1), 20 (1), 24 (1), 25 (2), 29 (2), 30 (4)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-30
     BROWN THRASHER: 22 (2), 24 (1 BY + 2), 25 (6), 26 (1 BY), 27 (7), 28 (1), 29 (3)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-16, 18-30
     PALM WARBLER: 24 (8), 25 (3)
     YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Myrtle): 15-17 (1), 19-20 (2), 23 (3), 24 (8+), 25 (2), 26 (1), 27 (3),
                                    29-30 (1)
     AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 1-5, 6 (6+), 7-10, 11-12 (1), 14 (6+), 15-17 (1), 18 (2)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 8 (3), 11 (1), 19-20, 23-30
     CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: 22 (2), 23 (1+), 29 (2), 30
     FIELD SPARROW: 2 (1), 3 (2), 5 (1), 12 (1), 15-16 (1), 24 (1), 29-30 (2)
     VESPER SPARROW: 1 (1), 3 (1), 4 (2), 6 (1), 14 (7+)
     SAVANNAH SPARROW: 4 (2), 16 (1), 21-22 (1), 24 (9), 27 (2), 29 (2)
     FOX SPARROW: 1 (3), 2 (2), 4 (1), 5-6 (3), 7-8 (1), 9-10 (3), 16-18 (1 BY)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-12, 14-30
     LINCOLN’S SPARROW: 24 (1 BY + 1), 25 (1 BY +1), 26 (2 BY), 27 (1 BY + 1), 29 (1)
     SWAMP SPARROW: 6 (1), 8 (1), 14-16 (1), 18 (1), 24 (3), 25 (1 BY + 2), 26 (1 BY), 27 (5 + 1 BY), 30
     WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: 20 (1 BY), 24 (40+), 25-30
     WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW: 27 (2 + 1 BY), 28 (1 + 1 BY), 30 (3+)
     DARK-EYED JUNCO (Slate-colored): 1-12, 14, 16 (1 BY), 17-18 (2 BY)
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-30
     ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 28 (1♂ BY)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-12, 14-30
     EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 4 (1), 8-9 (1), 12, 18, 19 (1), 20-23, 25-30
     RUSTY BLACKBIRD: 2 (16+), 3 (1), 8 (5)
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-30
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1 (20+), 2, 4-10, 12, 14-30
     PURPLE FINCH: 4 (1♀)
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-12, 14-30
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 2 (1), 5-6, 8, 10-12, 14, 17-18, 20-25, 27-30
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-12, 14-30

MAMMALIAN
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (1), 4 (1 + 5 BY), 7 (1 BY), 10 (4), 12 (1), 14 (6), 15 (12), 16 (7),
                                    17 (2 + 2 BY), 18 (2), 20 (2), 22 (1), 23 (4 + 3 BY), 24 (4), 25 (8), 27 (4),
                                    28 (2), 30 (3)
     WOODCHUCK: 16 (1)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 1-2, 4-9, 12-13, 16-17, 19-20, 23-30
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 10 (5), 14, 16-18, 25
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 3-5, 7, 9, 15-16, 24
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-30

REPTILIAN
     PLAINS GARTER SNAKE: 19 (2), 21 (1)
     garter snake sp.: 11 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 8 (4), 9-12, 15, 16 (1), 17-22, 25-27
     RED-EARED SLIDER: 15 (1), 18-22 (1), 26 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 2, 5, 7-13, 15-23, 25-30
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 20, 22, 25

LEPIDOPTERA
     CABBAGE WHITE: 25 (1)
     Sulphur sp.: 21 (1)
     anglewing sp.: 9 (2)
     MOURNING CLOAK: 7 (1), 9 (1), 10 (3), 11 (1), 17-20 (1), 22 (1), 25 (2), 26 (1)
     RED ADMIRAL: 22 (1), 25-26 (1)

ODONATA
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 11 (1), 12, 18 (3+), 19-22, 25-26
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 9 (2), 10 (4), 11 (6+), 12, 18-22, 25

Wolf. Oesterreich