Wednesday, March 30, 2016

March 30, 2016: Eastern Comma


An Eastern Comma, the third butterfly species observed this year, was found along the western arm of the bluff spur. 3/28/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, March 29, 2016

March 28, 2016: New Water Line to the Park


The construction of the new waterline from the north development down to the main shelter began today.  This shot shows the trenching down the north slope.  The water line was laid down in this trench. 3/28/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 26, 2016: Plains Garter Snake


This Plains Garter Snake was found just west of the Upland Trail's south trailhead.  The similar Eastern Garter Snake has the lateral line on the 2nd and 3rd row of scales, while on the 3rd and 4th row on the Plains.  Both species are found at the Park, although I believe that the Plains is the more common one. 3/26/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 24, 2016: Common Loon


There have been 4 Common Loons present on the main lakes the past two days; 3 on the north lake and 1 on the south lake.  This photo is of one of the adults (in breeding plumage). 3/24/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 22, 2016: House Finch


The first House Finch wasn't found in Iowa till 3 June 1982.  After 1986, they rapidly occupied most of Iowa.  Now they are found everywhere, even outnumbering Purple Finches in the Winter months.  The photograph shows a male. 3/19/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, March 28, 2016

March 20, 2016: Big Guy


Saw this big guy on March 14th at the edge of the south lake. 3/14/16 (Tana Tesdall)

March 18, 2016: Mourning Cloak


A Mourning Cloak has been sighted 3 times this month at the bluff, my first butterfly species of the year. 3/18/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 16, 2016: Stormy Sunset


Since I wasn't able to finish my ride this afternoon, I waited till the rain had stopped before heading out again.  Caught this sunset while at the NW corner of the Upland Trail. 3/15/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 14, 2016: Contemplation


Shared from the Ada Hayden Park Facebook page. 3/15/16 (Photograph by Sayan Ghosh)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ada-Hayden-Park/162929847065007

March 12, 2016: Evening Light


Shared from the Ada Hayden Park Facebook page. 3/9/16 (Photograph by Travis Hanson-Pollock‎)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ada-Hayden-Park/162929847065007

Sunday, March 20, 2016

March 10, 2016: From Fall to Spring


Empty Milkweed pod along the south shore of the south lake. 2/27/16 (Kevin Kane)

March 9, 2016: Tree at Sunset


Shared from the Ada Hayden Park Facebook page. 3/9/16 (Photograph by William Jenks)
https://www.facebook.com/pages/Ada-Hayden-Park/162929847065007

March 8, 2016: Northern Leopard Frog



The first Northern Leopard Frog observed this year was found on the lakes trail, opposite the north lake's west bay. 3/6/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 7, 2016: Melt Water over the Weir


Melt water flows over the weir that separates the southern wetlands from the south lake. 2/27/16 (Kevin Kane)

March 6, 2016: Red-winged Blackbird


For me, the early days of Spring begin with the arrival of Red-winged Blackbirds.  American Robins usually can be found throughout the year, including the Winter months, so they aren't the harbingers of Spring.  The first male Red-winged Blackbird arrived on the 19th of February and the species numbers increased thereafter.  They can be heard singing from all corners of the Park, except on windy days. 2/27/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

March 5, 2016: Ice Receding from Above the Bridge


Shared from the Ada Hayden Park Facebook page. 2/27/16 (Photograph by Tom Gustafson)

March 4, 2016: Sunset


Shared from the Ada Hayden Park Facebook page. 2/28/16 (Photograph by Jolene Erickson)

Saturday, March 5, 2016

Mar 3, 2016: Memories


Roses from an earlier celebration float along the ice edge under the bridge on Saturday. 2/27/16 (Kevin Kane)

Mar 2, 2016: Emerging from the Ice


Plants are emerging from the ice around the edges of the south lake. 2/27/16 (Kevin Kane)

Mar 1, 2016: Wolf's February 2016 Species Report


Bald Eagles are on the move!  This adult spent a lot of time over the main lakes, even landing on the ice at times. 2/28/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 40 (plus 1 sp.) avian species was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 2nd highest February (although tied with 2005 & 2011) among 19 years of records.


Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  ).  The order follows the 55th Supplement (2014) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 14th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     GREATER WHITE-FRONTED GOOSE: 19 (55+), 20 (85+), 26 (1), 27 (1000+),
           28 (100’s)
     SNOW GOOSE: 27-28 (100+)
     CACKLING GOOSE: 19-20 (~5), 21 (7+), 22 (3+), 26 (3+), 27-28 (5+)
     CANADA GOOSE: 2-5, 7-12, 14 (2), 15 (7), 16 (33+), 17 (27), 18 (111+), 19-29
     GADWALL: 28 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-4, 8, 10, 15 (~70), 16, 18 (5), 19 (20+), 20-29
     NORTHERN PINTAIL: 27 (20+), 28 (9+)
     GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 27 (2♂), 28 (2♂ + 1♀)
     CANVASBACK: 28 (1♀), 29 (1♂ + 4♀)
     REDHEAD: 26 (1♂), 27 (3♂), 28 (3♂ + 2♀), 29 (9♂ + 5♀)
     RING-NECKED DUCK: 25 (1♂ + 1♀), 28 (63+), 29 (19♂ + 8♀)
     LESSER SCAUP: 23-24 (1♂), 25 (1♂ + 1♀), 26 (1♂), 28 (20+)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 3, 19 (1♂), 22 (1♂), 24 (1♂), 25-26 (1), 27 (2)
     BALD EAGLE: 1-2 (1 ad), 4-6 (1 ad), 7 (1 ad + 1 im), 10 (1 ad + 1 im), 12 (1 ad + 1 im),
          18 (1 ad), 19 (2 ad), 22 (1 im), 24 (1 ad), 26 (1 im), 28 (1 ad + 1 im), 29 (1 im)
     SHARP-SHINNED HAWK: 16 (1)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 10 (1 ad BY), 17 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1-2 (1), 3 (3), 5 (3), 6-7 (1), 8-9 (2), 10 (1), 11 92), 13 (1), 15 (3),
          17 (3), 19 (1), 22-23 (1), 24 (2), 25-26 (1), 27 (2), 28-29 (1)
     KILLDEER: 20 (1), 27 (1), 28 (2)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 28 (3)
     MOURNING DOVE: 4 (1 BY + 1), 5 (2 BY), 7 (1 BY), 9 (5), 12 (2), 13-14 (1 BY), 15 (1),
               20 (11 + 1 BY), 21 (2 BY), 22 (4 BY), 23 (6), 26 (3 BY), 27 (3 BY + 4), 28 (5 BY)
     BARRED OWL: 11 (1)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 19 (1), 24 (1♂), 29 (1♂)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 13-14, 20-21, 23, 26, 29
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 2, 5-7, 9-10, 13-16, 18, 20-29
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 14 (1), 17-18 (1), 26 (1)
     AMERICAN KESTREL: 5 (1♂), 8-9 (1♂), 11-12 (1♂), 15-16 (1♂), 18 (1♂), 26 (1♂),
          27 (1♂)
     MERLIN: 8 (1♀)
     BLUE JAY: 2-4, 6, 11, 13-15, 20-23, 27
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-25, 27-29
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-18, 20-29
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 4, 7, 13, 15, 17, 20-22, 26, 28
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1 (7+), 2-7, 10 (1), 12-13 (1), 14 (1 BY), 15 (2), 17 (1), 18-19 (2),
          20 (7), 21 (1), 22 (2)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-7, 10-14, 16, 20-25, 27-29
     AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 1-21, 23 (1), 24 (4), 25 (5), 26 (1), 27, 28-29 (2)
     SONG SPARROW: 2 (2), 3 (3), 4 (5), 5-6 (3), 7 (2), 8 (1), 9 (3), 11-17 (1), 19 (1)
     DARK-EYED JUNCO (Slate-colored): 1-8, 10-18, 20-22, 24-29
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-29
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 19 (1♂), 23 (7 + 3 BY), 24 (3♂), 25 (2♂), 26 (1♂), 27-29
     Blackbirds sp.: 22-24 (flock of ~150)
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-9, 11, 13-29
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 6 (1 BY), 18 (1 BY), 21 (2 BY), 23-24 (1 BY), 28 (1 BY)
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-29

Unless indicated otherwise, the White-tailed Deer were antlerless. 

MAMMALIAN
     RED FOX: 3 (1 BY)
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (5 + 1♂), 3 (6 BY), 4 (9+), 5 (10), 6 (1 front yard), 11 (7),
          13 (4 BY + 1), 15 (2), 17 (2 BY), 22 (13 + 3 BY), 23 (22 + 2♂), 24 (1), 26 (3),
          28 (1 BY)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 2-4, 6-8, 10-11, 13-16, 18, 20-22, 24-29
     MEADOW VOLE: 2 (1)
     MUSKRAT: 24 (1)
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-2, 4-6, 8-14, 16-20, 23-24, 26

LEPIDOPTERA
     WOOLLY BEAR (Isabella Tiger Moth): 23 (2)

Wolf. Oesterreich