Tuesday, August 30, 2016

Monday, August 29, 2016

August 29, 2016: West Slope


From the Upland Trail, looking NW across the north prairie to the west slope. 8/7/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 28, 2016: Fishin' the Outlet


An angler prepares his bait at the wetland outlet into the south lake. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

August 27, 2016: Giant Swallowtail


Of the three swallowtail species found at the Park, the Giant Swallowtail (Papilio cresphontes) is the least common.  This individual is nectaring on an ironweed, found at the SE corner of Pool F. 8/10/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 26, 2016: Perched


8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

Sunday, August 28, 2016

August 24, 2016: Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar


The Milkweed Tussock Caterpillar is a moth (Milkweed Tussock Moth) in the Erebidae Family (Subfamily Arctiinae).  It feeds on milkweeds and dogbanes (both found at the Park) and can be found from southern Canada down to Texas and southeast to Florida.  Like most species in this family, it acquires a chemical defense (cardiac glycosides) from its host plants. 8/12/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 25, 2016: Pollinators Interpretive Talk


Donald Lewis, ISU Extension Entomologist, gave a presentation on the common pollinators in Iowa.  Afterwards, we searched the nearest flower bed for insects.  Two Monarch caterpillars were found on the Common Milkweeds. 8/25/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, August 27, 2016

August 23, 2016: A Letter to Friends of AHHP



The new path connecting the northern development with AHHP in the far northwest area of the park along the upland trail. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

I write with a couple questions regarding the recent changes in AH along the upland trail.

I was away for several weeks and only yesterday noticed the new paved lane connecting the upland trail near the Circle with the development at Hayden's Crossing. The new paved lane extends south from private land to the park's existing dirt trail.

(There has been) great concern about the potential erosion at the site and the impact rainwater would have on the trail. It was also not clear ... if the park's dirt trail was going to be paved and if so, concern was expressed that if that were to happen, the consequent increase in speed biking would  negatively affect hikers, people with disabilities, and leisure bikers and walkers.

(We) looked at the paved path and how it merges with the existing trail and agreed ... that it did not look very good with regard to potential run-off and erosion. Even though a completely paved upland trail would be welcomed by many, the change would be substantial and completely change the current feeling of being in a truly natural setting.

Thanks so much for all you do.
-----
Response from Keith Abraham, Dir. of Parks and Recreation
City of Ames

Thank you for passing on your concerns and comments!
In response to your comments and questions:

We do not have any intention of paving the Upland Trail. There are many walkers, hikers, runners, etc. who have expressed their desire to keep this trail as is. In conversation with the developers of Hayden's Crossing, and Quarry Estates, any trail connection within the park is to have the new material match the existing material. Joshua and I visited the site today and are sure they used asphalt millings which is what the Upland Trail is made of. The difference is these new millings appear to be smaller and have been compressed which makes the trail look like it has been paved. At the start of the path in Hayden's Crossing, the millings are 8+ inches thick yet they are very thin on the Upland Trail. As people use this section of the trail, the millings will get broken up and blend in with the current material. I was able to break up the millings on the trail fairly easily.

As for the erosion issues. It does appear there are erosion issues currently and this is causing sediment to deposit on the trail. We will be contacting Hunziker to get the sides of the path back filled, graded, and seeded to prevent further erosion.

The weeds in the middle of the path were sprayed as mowing and foot traffic wasn't controlling them very well.

I also want to echo Erv's comments regarding the Friends Group and the City working closely together in the best interest of the park. Erv and Jim Pease developed a management plan for Ada Hayden and has been a wonderful resource for us. We refer to it often as we determine what is needed at the park. We have had requests for multiple things (i.e. playgrounds, athletic fields, etc.) to be placed at Ada Hayden and continue to say no as that is not the intent of this park. We agree it will be an increasing challenge to keep it this way as more and more homes are developed and demands continue to come forth. Currently, City Council is very cognizant of the importance of Ada Hayden and the water shed area. This was evident listening to Council Member comments recently regarding the proposed Rose Prairie development in which Council did not approve the developer's request to build 700+ homes. We need to continue to work together to make sure Ada Hayden stays as it was intended.

If you have any further questions, please contact me. Have a great day!

August 22, 2016: Black Swallowtail Life Stages


Black Swallowtails (Papilio polyxenes), a member of the Papilionidae Family, are a common species at the Park.  Here are three life stages:
1) caterpillar (top)
2) chrysalis (middle)
3) adult female (bottom)



7/31/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 21, 2016: Lone Tree


The sun sets through a lone tree in the northwest corner of the park. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

August 20, 2016: Whorled Milkweed


Of the four milkweed species found at the Park, the Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias verticillata) is the daintiest and has the smallest distribution.  7/30/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, August 20, 2016

Thursday, August 18, 2016

August 18, 2016: Ada Hayden Fishery Talk


Tonight, Jeff Kopaska, DNR Fisheries, gave a talk on the "Ada Hayden Fishery".  He discussed current and future management practices, what "Master Fishes" have been caught at the park, and which species can be found here, along with their habits and requirements. 8/18/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 17, 2016: Storm Clouds Rising


Storm clouds form to the north of Ames, over the northern hills of the park. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, August 17, 2016

August 16, 2016: Gizzard Shad


Hundreds of Gizzard Shad (Dorosoma cepedianum) have been observed along the shore of the south lake and below Weir N.  This shad is a member of the herring family (Clupeidae) and are a source of food for some of the other fish species at the Park. 8/9/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 15, 2016: American Goldfinch

 American Goldfinch along the southwestern trail. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, August 16, 2016

August 14, 2016: Little Yellow


Those small yellow butterflies that flutter low along the edge of the trails never seem to stop.  I was finally able to obtain a photograph of this Little Yellow (Pyrisitia [Eurema] lisa), one of the sulphurs found at the Park. 7/30/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 13, 2016: Eastern Clouds at Sunset


The setting sun illuminates a cloud bank to the northeast over the south lake. 8/13/16 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, August 13, 2016

August 12, 2016: Joe Pye Weed


Many Joe Pye Weed (Eupatorium maculatum) plants, a member of the sunflower family (Asteraceae), can be found along the west side of Pond M.  The leaves are lanceolate, have toothed margins, and are arranged in whorls of 5 to 6.  This plant may grow over 6-feet tall. 7/27/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, August 11, 2016

August 10, 2016: Mink


While standing on Weir N and looking for Odonates, I spotted an American Mink (Mustela vison) hunting below.  I was on the south end and the mink came from the north, swimming along the bottom of the weir, catching small fish when possible.  When it reached the south end it happened to look up and spot me.  The mink ran up the bank and into the vegetation.  I watched as it scurried around the culvert (outlet to the south lake) and then end up back at the north end.  Once again, the mink swam along the edge of the weir, looked up at me to see if I was still there, and ran around.  The American Mink did this again for a third time.  However, when it reached the north end, it ran off into the vegetation, probably tired of this "game". 8/9/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 9, 2016: Sparkling Beauty


Two kayakers silhouetted on the sparkling waters of the north lake. 7/30/16 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, August 10, 2016

August 8, 2016: Viceroy


I've observed more Viceroys (Limenitis archippus) at the Park than Monarchs, which they closely resemble.  This individual was perched on a milkweed. 7/30/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, August 9, 2016

August 7, 2016: Queen Anne's Lace


Queen Anne's Lace in the central wetland complex. 7/30/16 (Kevin Kane)
  
Queen Anne's lace
D. carota was introduced and naturalized in North America, where it is often known as "Queen Anne's lace". Both Anne, Queen of Great Britain, and her great grandmother Anne of Denmark are taken to be the Queen Anne for which the plant is named.[11] It is so called because the flower resembles lace; the red flower in the center is thought to represent a blood droplet where Queen Anne pricked herself with a needle when she was making the lace.

August 6, 2016: Diving for Dinner


Ducks looking for food under the surface of the SW inlet on the south lake. 7/30/16 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, August 8, 2016

August 5, 2016: North Lake & Clouds


Looking SE across the north lake towards the clouds of a rain system that slid south of Ames (from the NW corner of the north lake's west bay). 7/27/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 4, 2016: Side Oats Grama

Side Oats Grama along the upper trail. 7/30/16 (Ruthann Hadish)

Thursday, August 4, 2016

August 3, 2016: Great Blue Heron


A Great Blue Heron perched in a snag, overlooking Pool F. 7/30/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, August 2, 2016

August 2, 2016: Summer Clouds


A perfect summer day at the Park is reflected in the south lake. 7/30/16 (Kevin Kane)

Aug 1, 2016: Wolf's July 2016 Wildlife Report


Spot-winged Glider (Pantala hymenaea):  My first individual was found on the 2nd, along the Upland Trail.  (Erv had recorded one in 2009.) 7/2/16 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Total Length = 45-50 mm; Hind Wing Length = 40-45 mm
Flight Season = June - September


A total of 68 avian species was recorded this month, ranking this month as 6th highest July total among 19 years of records.  July 2007 with 84 species remains as the highest July, while July 1998, with only 45 species, remains as the lowest.

Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the sightings of 2 Short-billed Dowitchers on the 2nd and 3rd may represent extreme early Fall records for Story County (former record set on 5 July 1982 at Colo Bogs).  The 2 Caspian Terns on the 4th are additional Summer records, while the 1 on 28th may represent another extreme early Fall record (former set on 29 July 1994 at Hallett’s Quarry).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 55th Supplement (2014) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 14th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-11, 13-31
     WOOD DUCK: 1-6, 8-25, 27-31
     MALLARD: 1-19, 21-31
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 4 (1♂ + 1♀)
     RUDDY DUCK: 18 (1♂ + 1♀)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1-3, 7, 15 (3♂), 19, 27, 30-31
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 29 (46)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (9), 2 (11), 3 (14), 4 (15), 5 (13), 6 (10), 7 (12),
          8 (11), 9 (5), 10 (4), 11 (2), 12 (4), 13 (5), 14 (3), 15 (9), 16 (6), 17 (7),
          18 (8), 19 (11), 20 (6), 21 (8), 22 (11), 23 (10), 24-25 (8), 26-27 (6),
          28-29 (7), 30 (12), 31 (10)
     GREAT EGRET: 1-7 (1), 9 (1)
     GREEN HERON: 2 (1), 4 (1), 7 (1), 12 (1), 17 (1), 19-21 (1), 23 (1), 24 (2),
          25 (1), 28 (1), 30-31 (1)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (5), 2 (3), 3 (4), 5 (3), 6 (2), 7 (6), 8 (8), 9 (1), 10 (2),
          11 (4), 12 (1), 13-15 (3), 16 (4), 17 (6), 18 (3), 19 (5), 20-21 (3), 22 (1),
          24-25 (2), 26 (4), 28 (7), 29 (3), 30 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 10 (1 ad), 16-19 (1 ad), 20 (2 ad), 24 (1 im)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 3 (1 ad), 8 (1 ad), 29 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (2), 2-6 (1), 7 (2), 8 (3), 9-10 (2), 12-13 (3), 15 (3),
          16 (1), 18-19 (1), 21-22 (1), 25 (1), 26 (2), 27 (3), 28-29 (2), 30 (1), 31 (2)
     KILLDEER: 1 (28+), 2 (23+), 3 (18+), 4 (22+), 5 (25+), 6 (38+), 7 (34+),
          8 (15+), 9 (19+), 10 (7), 11 (19+), 12 (6+), 13 (7), 14 (9), 15 (4), 16 (5),
          17 (2), 18 (1), 20 (1), 22 (1), 24-26 (1), 27 (3), 28-29 (2), 30 (1), 31 (3)
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 2 (1), 5 (1), 6 (2), 11 (1), 17 (2)
     SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 9 (1), 15 (1)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 30 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 12 (1)
     SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER: 2-3 (2)
     CASPIAN TERN: 4 (2), 28 (1)
     FORSTER’S TERN: 14 (9)
     EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE: 1-4 (1), 10-12 (1), 17-18 (1), 26-27 (1),
          29-30 (1)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-24, 26-31
     YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: 2 (1), 4 (2), 5 (1), 6 (2), 9 (1), 11-12 (2), 13 (1),
          15 (2), 16-19 (1), 26-27 (1), 30 (1)
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 4 (1), 22 (1), 28-29 (1)
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 6 (2), 13 (1), 22-23 (1), 27 (1), 30 (1)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 11 (1♂), 12 (1), 19 (1), 21 (1), 25 (1♂), 30 (1)
     RED-HEADED WOODPECKER: 31 (1 ad)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 9-10, 23, 25, 29
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 2-4, 16-17, 19-21, 23, 27, 29
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 28 (1)
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1 (1), 3 (1), 6 (1), 8 (1), 15 (1), 16 (4),
          17 (1), 19 (1), 31 (1)
     WILLOW FLYCATCHER: 13 (1), 17 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 1 (6), 2 (1), 3 (4), 4 (5), 5 (2), 6 (4), 7 (2), 8 (4),
          9-10 (2), 11 (3), 12 (1), 13 (2), 14 (3), 15 (1), 17 (3), 18-19 (4), 21 (2),
          22 (3), 23 (1), 24 (6), 25 (3), 26 (1), 28-29 (4), 30 (6), 31 (5)
     WARBLING VIREO: 1-4, 6, 9-12, 15, 17
     BLUE JAY: 1-5, 9-10, 12, 14-19, 22-29, 31
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-5, 7-19, 21-30
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-31
     TREE SWALLOW: 1-14, 19, 22, 25
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 2, 4
     BANK SWALLOW: 17 (1), 19
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 1-11, 14, 16-19, 21-22, 27-29, 31
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-17, 19-31
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-2, 4-5, 7, 9-10, 12-13, 17, 19, 25-27, 29-30
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 2, 4, 7, 9, 26-27, 30-31
     HOUSE WREN: 1-27, 29-31
     SEDGE WREN: 3 (1), 26 (1), 29-30 (3), 31 (1)
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 (1), 4 (1), 11 (1), 12 (2), 13 (1), 15 (1), 17-18 (1),
          19 (2), 21 (1), 22 (3), 23 (1), 24 (2), 28-29 (1)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 1-19, 21-24, 26-31
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 6, 8, 12, 20
     CEDAR WAXWING: 3 (1), 5 (1), 6-7 (1), 12 (1), 13 (3), 21 (3), 28 (6), 30 (1)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-31
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1, 3-4, 6-7, 9-11, 13, 15, 17-20, 22-23, 25-30
     FIELD SPARROW: 23 (1), 25-26 (1)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-31
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-31
     INDIGO BUNTING: 1-7, 9-14, 16-23, 26-29
     DICKCISSEL: 1-23, 25-31
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-31
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-15
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1-4, 6-10, 13, 15-16, 18-19, 21, 25, 27, 30
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 21 (1♂)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 1-6, 8-10, 17 (3)
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-12, 14-31
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-31

MAMMALIAN
     AMERICAN MINK: 24 (1)
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (1 + 1♀ w/1 fawn), 16 (1♀ w/2 fawns), 18 (2 + 1♀
          w/2 fawns), 20 (1 + 1♀ w/2 fawns), 23 (1♀ w/2 fawns), 25 (1♀ w/1 fawn),
          28 (2 fawns), 29 (1 + 1♀ w/2 fawns), 30 (2), 31 (1 fawn)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 1, 4, 6, 8-9, 12, 25-26, 30
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 1-2, 4, 10, 30
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 1, 4, 12, 18, 20
     MUSKRAT: 24 (1), 28 (1)
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-10, 12-31

REPTILIAN
     Garter Snake sp: 8 (1), 22 (1)
     COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE: 1 (1), 4 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-22, 24-31
     RED-EARED SLIDER: 1 (1), 3 (1), 13 (1), 16 (1), 20 (1)
     WESTERN SPINY SOFTSHELL: 5-6 (1), 8-9 (1), 11 (2), 14 (2), 15 (1), 17 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 1, 5, 10-13, 19, 21, 24, 26-27
     BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 18-20, 22-24, 26-27
     EASTERN GRAY TREE FROG: 17
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 19
     AMERICAN BULLFROG: 1-31
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 3-4, 10, 13, 23

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 1-7, 9-16, 18, 20, 22-28, 30-31
     GIANT SWALLOWTAIL: 23 (1)
     EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 6 (1), 9-11 (1), 17 (1 caterpillar), 21 (1),
          22 (3), 24 (1), 26 (3), 28, 30 (2), 31 (1)
     CABBAGE WHITE: 1-31
     CLOUDED SULPHUR: 12, 17-18, 23, 25-26
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 1-18, 20-31
     LITTLE YELLOW: 29, 31
     GRAY COPPER: 1
     EASTERN TAILED-BLUE: 3-15, 17-31
     VARIEGATED FRITILLARY: 23 (1)
     GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY: 4 (1), 7 (1), 10 (1)
     PEARL CRESCENT: 1-3, 5-7, 9-11, 14-15, 17, 26-28, 30-31
     QUESTION MARK: 27
     PAINTED LADY: 18
     RED ADMIRAL: 1-2, 5, 9, 11, 18, 22, 24-26, 28, 30
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 1, 5, 8, 13, 15-18, 20-28, 30
     VICEROY: 1-3, 5, 7-10, 12-15, 17-18, 20, 22-31
     HACKBERRY EMPEROR: 27, 31
     MONARCH: 1 (3), 3 (1), 5 (1), 6 (2), 7 (4), 8 (1), 9 (2), 11-12 (2), 13 (4), 14 (5),
          15 (1), 17 (1), 18 (2), 20 (2), 21 (4), 22 (2), 23 (3), 24 (1), 25 (2), 26-27 (3),
          28-30 (1)
     COMMON CHECKERED-SKIPPER: 6 (1)
     COMMON SOOTYWING: 28
     LEAST SKIPPER: 3, 22, 25-28, 30-31
     FIERY SKIPPER: 3, 25
     PECK’S SKIPPER: 26, 28
     CHICKWEED GEOMETER: 22-23, 26

ODONATA
     EBONY JEWELWING: 3 (1), 12 (1♀)
     AMERICAN RUBYSPOT: 9 (1)
     SLENDER SPREADWING: 4 (1♀)
     Spreadwing sp.: 17 (1), 28 (1)
     BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 1, 3-28, 30-31
     POWDERED DANCER: 1, 3, 5-9, 11-16, 21-30
     RAINBOW BLUET: 1-3, 6, 9, 13-14, 21
     AZURE BLUET: 1 (2), 3 (1), 6 (1)
     DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 14
     TULE BLUET: 1-2, 5-6, 8-9, 11-15, 18-20, 22, 25-28
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 1, 3, 5-7, 9-10, 12, 14-18, 20-22, 24-28, 30-31
     STREAM BLUET: 1, 3-18, 20-28, 30-31
     ORANGE BLUET: 2, 7, 12, 14-15, 18-20, 26, 29
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1-20, 22-31
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1. 3, 5-15, 17-18, 20-22, 24-28, 30-31
     Blue Mosaic sp.: 17 (1)
     JADE CLUBTAIL: 5-6 (1), 13 (1), 15 (1), 17 (1)
     FLAG-TAILED SPINYLEG: 22 (1)
     PLAINS CLUBTAIL: 1 (1)
     PRINCE BASKETTAIL: 1, 5-7, 9-10, 12, 14-15, 18, 20, 23
     HALLOWEEN PENNANT: 18 (1), 21 (1)
     EASTERN PONDHAWK: 1, 6, 8-10, 12-16, 18, 20-30
     WIDOW SKIMMER: 1, 3-18, 20-28, 30-31
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 1-9, 11-18, 20-28, 30-31
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 1, 6-18, 20-28, 30
     BLUE DASHER: 1, 3, 5-14, 16-18, 20-28, 30-31
     WANDERING GLIDER: 1, 3, 5, 7-8, 10, 12-14, 16-18, 20-21, 26-27, 31
     SPOT-WINGED GLIDER: 2 (1)
     EASTERN AMBERWING: 1, 3, 5-9, 11-18, 20-28, 30-31
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 18, 20-22, 24-27, 31
     CHERRY-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 15 (1), 17 (1)
     WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 14 (1♀)
     RUBY MEADOWHAWK: 5 (1♀), 7, 14, 16, 20
     BAND-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 21 (1), 24
     Meadowhawk sp.: 18, 20-21, 24-25, 27-28
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 1, 3, 5-14, 16-18, 20-28, 31
     RED SADDLEBAGS: 1, 5-6, 8, 17-18, 20, 22-23, 25, 27

ORTHOPTERA
     CAROLINA GRASSHOPPER: 1, 3, 5-18, 20-31

Wolf. Oesterreich