Sunday, August 31, 2014

August 31, 2014: August 2014 Photo Collage



August 2014 photos from the blog by Tyler Harms, Kevin Kane, Wolf. Oesterreich, , and LaDan Omidvar.

Saturday, August 30, 2014

August 30, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #71


Sunflower at dusk on the east side of the north lake. 8/30/14 (Kevin Kane)

Saturday, August 30, 2014. Sunny, no wind 79 degrees F.

I parked in the southwest parking lot and walked the trail on the west side that leads to the upland. The installation of the sanitary sewer has left a wide scar of bare soil across the landscape parallel to the trail. This will eventually be reseeded in prairie. The sewer is necessary to allow housing developments to the west and north of the park.

I stopped several times to take pictures of prairie flowers and pollinators such as bumblebees, honeybees, soldier beetles, and wasps. Some of the flowers in bloom were rigid goldenrod, field thistle, Canada goldenrod, sawtooth sunflower, Jerusalem artichoke, beebalm, and blue lobelia. Indian grass and big bluestem is also in bloom. I counted 10 male Band-winged Meadowhawks along the trail. This is one of the small red dragonflies that fly each year in late summer. I also saw a Ruby Meadowhawk and several White-faced Meadowhawks.

I left the trail and made my way through reed canary grass along a small creek that leads into what we call Pond G, part of the north wetland complex. I was looking for the damselfly, Ebony Jewelwing, along the creek but I saw none. This creek was dry for an extended period in 2012 and 2013 and the drought may have caused them to be extirpated here. The Ebony Jewelwing is almost always found along streams and this is the only suitable habitat in the park for this species. I finally made it to the edge of the pond and immediately spotted a damselfly perched in the grass. I tentatively identified it as a Slender Spreadwing, but a few pictures taken with my long lens will help me confirm this when I get home. The only other damselfly I saw was a male Eastern Forktail. Several Widow Skimmers were flying over the pond. I could not find a decent deer path pack to the main trail so I had to work my way through the tall prairie grass. The big bluestem was well over my head; this is a very good year for prairie grasses. By the time I got back to the trail my shoes were untied and my socks and pants were full of sticky seeds from tic trefoil. I have heard that seeds like these inspired the invention of velcro.

Erv Klaas

August 29, 2014: Red-tailed Hawk



This juvenile Red-tailed Hawk was found perched in a snag along the Upland Trail, just west of Jensen Pond.  The photo on the left was taken on 8/26 while the right photo was taken on 8/27.  Note the full crop (bulge on the upper chest) on the 27th, indicating that the hawk had recently eaten.  (It's possible that this hawk is one of the two raised on Park property.) 8/27/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday, August 29, 2014

August 28, 2014: Hayden Park News 21



Butterfly interpretive talk. 8/28/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

The interpretive program on butterflies this evening. We had a turnout of 25. Tyler Harms explained the basics of butterfly biology and the diversity found in the park. Despite the cool windy and cloudy weather a walk in the nearby prairie yielded a few butterflies, dragonflies and green tree frogs. The prairie planting in the middle of the parking lot is beautiful right now with a diversity of flowering forbs and grasses.

Someone left a black jacket (with a hood and white draw strings) and a stainless steel water bottle (Take back the Top label). I have it at my home. Reply to this email or give me a call and we'll determine how to return it to you.

The next program will be on birds with Jim Pease on Wednesday, Sept. 10.

Erv Klaas

Thursday, August 28, 2014

August 27, 2014: Hayden Park News 20

An eastward view along the north slope, as viewed from the Upland Trail's NW corner. (Another gloomy day.) 8/20/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Dear Friends:

This is to correct an error in the previous News (19). Jim Pease's program on birds will be Wednesday, September 10 at 5:30 pm.

The reason it is Wednesday, not Thursday, is because the annual Paul Errington Memorial Lecture is Thursday evening at 7 pm in the Great Hall of the Memorial Union. The speaker will be Douglas Smith. Doug is a senior wildlife biologist with the National Park Service and has been involved with wolves in Yellowstone since their controversial reintroduction to the park in 1992. He joined the Yellowstone Gray Wolf Restoration Project in 1994 as a research technician and now serves as the project leader, supervising research on ecosystem responses to the predator and educating people on wildlife conservation and endangered species preservation. Prior to Yellowstone, Smith worked with wolves on Michigan's Isle Royale and in Minnesota. He is the author of Decade of the Wolf: Returning the Wild to Yellowstone.

This promises to be a very interesting lecture.

Erv Klaas

Wednesday, August 27, 2014

August 26, 2014: Butterfly Talk, 8/28



 8/2/2005 (Kevin Kane)


Hayden Park News 19
Erv Klaas

Three more interpretive programs coming up:

Thursday, August 28, 5:30 pm. Tyler Harms will show you some of colorful butterflies that occur at the park. Meet at the shelter on the north side.

Thursday, September 11, 5:30 pm. Jim Pease will conduct an interpretive work on birds. Fall migrants are passing through. Bring binoculars if you have them. Meet at the shelter on the north side.

Thursday, September 18, 5:30 pm. We will join Deb Lewis for "Prairie Words." Bring your favorite essay or poem to share with the group. Meet at the shelter on the north side.

Tuesday, August 26, 2014

Monday, August 25, 2014

August 24, 2014: Sunflowers



The flowers of the Cup Plant (Silphium perfoliatum) [left] and Compass Plant (Silphium laciniatum) [right] are very similar. The differences appear in the foliage. Cup Plants can grow up to 8-foot tall and have large opposite leaves that are joined at the stem, forming a "cup" that can actually hold water. Compass Plants have huge basal leaves, with smaller and alternate leaves along its length, and grows from 3 to 8-foot tall. The irregularly lobed basal leaves are generally oriented in a north-south direction, thus its name. Both are members of the Sunflower Family (Asteraceae). 8/9/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, August 23, 2014

August 23, 2014: Wetlands Interpretive Talk








Dr. Tim Stewart (ISU), accompanied by Mike Sundberg (grad student), gave a talk on the function of the Park's constructed wetlands last Thursday (left). He also showed us some aquatic plants, invertebrates, fish, and turtle. Later, they pull up a net trap from Pond J and emptied the contents into a bucket. Several fish species and a crayfish (right) had been collected. 8/21/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)


August 22, 2014: Development of the Northern Hills

A view of the northern hills from the south lake looking northwest. 7/7/14 (Kevin Kane)

P&Z makes first northern growth area rezoning suggestion (Ames Tribune)

By Gavin Aronsen
Staff Writer
garonsen@amestrib.com

Plans moved ahead Wednesday for the first rezoning of the northern growth area properties that were annexed by the Ames City Council last December, with the Planning and Zoning Commission recommending that a 79-acre parcel owned by Friedrich Land Development LLC of Ames be rezoned for residential housing.

See more at: http://amestrib.com/news/pz-makes-first-northern-growth-area-rezoning-suggestion

Friday, August 22, 2014

August 21, 2014: Spider Webs


The morning fog creates droplets on the spiderwebs backlit by the sun along the southeastern fence. 8/17/2014 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, August 21, 2014

August 20, 2014: Eastern Tiger Swallowtail



Each of these photographs is of a female Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. The one on the left is the normal yellow form, while the one on the right is the black form. The black form is easily confused with the Black Swallowtail. Instead of having yellow spots on the thorax and abdomen (Black Swallowtail), there is a yellow line on both sides of the body. 8/17/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, August 20, 2014

August 19, 2014: Hayden Park News 18

A NW and N view across Pool F under an overcast sky. The west portion (hidden behind the vegetation) of the pool is now just mud with a puddle below the weir. The east pool is visible and also drying up. Great Blue Herons and Great Egrets are still present. 8/15/14
(Wolf. Oesterreich)





Dear Friends:

The next interpretive program will be Thursday, Aug. 21 at 5:30 pm. The leader will be Dr. Tim Stewart, ISU faculty in Natural Resources, who will lead a discussion on the function of the park's constructed wetlands. Meet at the southwest parking lot on Harrison Road.

Tyler Harms will lead an interpretive walk on butterflies on Thursday, Aug. 28 at 5:30. Meet at the shelter.

Deb Lewis will lead the following on September 18th:

Prairie Words: Sharing Writings Related to Prairies
6 to 8 pm, Thursday, Ada Hayden Heritage Park - meet at the shelter.
In celebration of Iowa Prairie Heritage Week, participants are asked to bring their favorite passage of prairie literature or a piece of original writing with a prairie focus (poems/lyrics/short essays, etc.).
If the weather is ok, we'll take a short walk to read near one of the prairie areas, so dress accordingly. Bring a folding chair if you wish. The maximum length of each reading will be based on the number of readers present, but will probably be ~5 minutes. Please note that this is a family-friendly event.

Come to read, or just to enjoy others' "prairie words"! For more information, contact Deb Lewis, dlewis@iastate.edu; 515-290-6736.

August 18, 2014: American Bellflower



The main population of the American Bellflower is found on the south side of the SE restroom facility. This plant, a member of the Bluebell Family (Campanulaceae), can grow from 3 to 6 feet tall and is found mainly on wet soils of shady woodlands and streambanks. It blooms from June to frost. 8/9/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, August 18, 2014

August 17, 2014: Early Morning Fog



Sunday morning fog on the south lake looking northwest from the outflow. 8/17/14 (Kevin Kane)

Sunday, August 17, 2014

August 16, 2014: American Toad



This American Toad was sunning on a rock along the north shore of the north lake's west bay. 8/17/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 15, 2014: Pearl Crescents



Pearl Crescents (Phycoides tharos) are one of the most common and familiar butterflies, especially east of the Rockies. They are members of the Nymphalidae family. 8/16/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, August 16, 2014

August 14, 2014: Fish Talk



Nine attendees were present for Jeff Kopaska's talk regarding fish management and water quality at Ada Hayden and other places in Iowa. 8/14/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

August 13, 2014: AHHP History, 10/27/2000



Friends of Hallett's Quarry volunteers host an open house days before before the Nov. 6, 2001 referendum vote. This photo was taken on the northeast corner of the south lake looking southwest toward the water tower.  The gate in the background led to an ishmus between the two lakes (the lakes were not connected) to what is now the bridge.  10/27/2001 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, August 13, 2014

Tuesday, August 12, 2014

August 11, 2014: I'll Follow the Sun

video


Following the setting sun along the east shore of the south lake. 7/25/14 (Kevin Kane)

August 10, 2014: Purple Prairie Clover

Purple prairie clover catches the last sunlight of the day in the central prairie. 7/25/14 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, August 11, 2014

August 9, 2014: Great Egrets



These two (of 5 present) Great Egrets are preening, while standing on an "island
at Pool F. [A digiscoped photo.] 8/5/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, August 9, 2014

August 8, 2014: Checking Checklists



Stephanie Fox and Wolf .Oesterreich compare their butterfly checklists near the Harrison Road parking area.  8/8/14 (Kevin Kane)

Not only are Stephanie and Wolf. passionate about documenting wildlife in the park but both are Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park officers as well.

Friday, August 8, 2014

August 7, 2014: Chrysanthrax Bee Fly



Chrysanthrax Bee Fly. 8/4/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This Chrysanthrax Bee Fly (Family Bombyliidae) was found along the Upland Trail, just before starting up the west slope. It is approximately 0.5-inch long, with large reddish-brown eyes, a band of of yellow-orange hair behind the head, an abdomen  with golden-tan hairs, and bicolored wings. It can be found from Iowa to Massachusetts, south to Texas and Florida. I had never seen this species before.


Wolf. Oesterreich

August 6, 2014: Birds on the Wetland



A view of Pool F showing 8 of 18 Great Blue Herons and 2 of 4 Great Egrets. Also present are Canada Geese, Wood Ducks, Mallards, and Killdeer. (This Summer, I've recorded up to 33 Great Blue Herons and 11 Great Egrets.) 8/3/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, August 6, 2014

August 5, 2014: Common Sanddragon


Common Sanddragon. 8/4/14 (Tyler Harms)

Common Sanddragon, a member of the clubtail family of dragonflies (note the larger, "club-like" end of the abdomen).  The yellow claspers (appendages at the tip of the abdomen) help distinguish this species from others in the clubtail family.  As their name implies, Common Sanddragons prefer streams, rivers, and lakes with sandy bottoms.  The patrol flowing water in search for prey and will often capture their prey in flight as other dragonflies do.  This is the first observation of this species at the Park and the fourth clubtail species observed at the Park this year  It was photographed along the Upland Trail

Tyler

Tuesday, August 5, 2014

August 4, 2014: Invasive Species Program on Thursday 8/7





Musk Thistle. 6/7/12 (Kevin Kane)

Dear Friends,

This week's interpretive program will be on invasive species. We will meet at the shelter on the north side, Thursday, Aug. 7, at 5:30 pm.

Erv Klaas

August 3, 2014: Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrel



The heat hasn't driven the Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels underground. They are still present in many areas of the Park. 7/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, August 4, 2014

August 2, 2014: Wolf's July 2014 Wildlife Report




Common Yellowthroats are quite common in the prairie areas of the Park. This female was interested in my "pishing" and flew in close to investigate. 7/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)


A total of 70 (plus 1 sp.) avian species was recorded this month at Ada Hayden Heritage Park, ranking this month as 5th highest July total (tied with 2004) among 17 years of records.



Listed below, following the species' names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 54th Supplement (2013) to the American Ornithologists' Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 13th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-2, 4-6, 8-11, 13-15, 17-31
     WOOD DUCK: 4 (2♀), 6 (1♀), 9-10, 12, 14 (1), 19-31
     MALLARD: 1-9, 11-31
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 2-6, 9, 12, 16, 19, 23-26, 28, 31
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 2 (1)
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 2 (1), 10-13 (1), 15-22 (1), 22-26 (2), 27 (1)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (3), 2 (2), 4 (3), 5-7 (1), 8 (3), 9 (1), 10 (6), 11 (7), 12 (5), 13 (2), 14 (1),
                                    15 (7), 16 (2), 17-18 (6), 19 (15), 20 (12), 21 (22), 22-23 (28), 24 (31), 25 (21),
                                    26 (27), 27 (33), 28 (32), 29 (15), 30 (16), 31 (17)
     GREAT EGRET: 11 (5), 12-13 (7), 14 (4), 15 (8), 16-17 (7), 18 (6), 19-20 (10), 21 (8), 22 (11), 23 (7),
                                    24-25 (10), 26 (11), 27 (8), 28 (9), 29 (11), 30 (7), 31 (9)
     GREEN HERON: 2 (1), 7 (1), 11 (1), 21 (1), 26 (1), 30-31 (1)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (1), 3 (1), 4 (2), 5 (1), 6 (3), 7 (11), 9 (1), 10 (2), 11 (1), 12 (11), 14 (5+), 15 (3),
                                    16 (2), 18-19 (1), 21 (1), 30 (1)
     OSPREY: 1-3 (1), 19 (1), 22 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 10 (1 ad), 15 (1 ad), 17 (1 ad), 18 (1 4-yr), 23-26 (1 ad)
     COOPER'S HAWK: 24 (1), 27 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (1), 2, 3 (1), 4 (2), 5-6 (1), 8-9 (2), 10 (1), 12 (1), 15 (2), 16 (1), 17 (2), 19 (2),
                                    21-22 (1), 23 (2), 24 (1), 25 (2), 26-28 (1), 30 (3)
     KILLDEER: 1 (3), 2-4 (2), 5, 7 (4), 8-9 (1), 10 (4), 16-17, 20, 23-31
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 22 (1), 25 (1), 27 (1), 28 (2), 29 (4), 30 (2), 31 (2)
     SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 25 (7), 26 (5), 27 (20+), 28-29 (1), 30-31 (5)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 26 (2)
     LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 26 (1), 27 (2), 28 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 27 (1), 28 (2), 29 (3), 30 (2), 31 (7)
     LEAST SANDPIPER: 26 (2), 27 (5+), 29 (6), 30 (3), 31 (1)
     PECTORAL SANDPIPER: 25 (5), 26 (10), 27 (13+), 28 (6), 29 (2), 30 (8), 31 (2)
     Sandpiper sp.: 23
     RING-BILLED GULL: 1 (1)
     BLACK TERN: 2 (2)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-31
     GREAT HORNED OWL: 17 (1), 29 (1)
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 21 (3), 27
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 10 (1♀), 12 (1♀), 16 (1♀), 18 (1? + 1♀), 19 (1♀), 23 (1), 29 (1♀)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 6-7 (1), 10-11 (1), 28-29 (1)
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 2-3, 5, 7, 11, 18, 21, 28, 30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 1 (2), 4, 8
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1 (1), 4 (1), 5 (2), 6 (1), 9 (2), 10, 12, 14-16, 19, 24
     EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 18 (1)
     WILLOW FLYCATCHER: 23 (1), 26 (1)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 6 (1)
     GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 4 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 1 (1), 3 (2), 4, 5 (2), 6 (1), 7 (2), 8 (1), 12 (2), 15 (3), 16 (1), 17 (2), 18-19 (1),
                                    20 (3), 21 (1), 23 (2), 25-26 (3), 27-28 (2), 29 (3), 30-31 (2)
     WARBLING VIREO: 1-9, 11-13, 15-18, 20-21, 23, 26, 28
     BLUE JAY: 1, 3-6, 13, 16-17, 22-23, 26, 28
     AMERICAN CROW: 1, 4-6, 9-12, 14-18, 20-31
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-31
     TREE SWALLOW: 1-7, 10-14, 18-19
     BANK SWALLOW: 23 (1), 26, 31
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 6 (1), 7, 11, 16, 25-28, 31
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-31
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 2, 4-13, 16, 18-31
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 5, 24, 27, 30-31
     HOUSE WREN: 1-31
     SEDGE WREN: 20 (2), 21 (3), 22 (1), 23-24, 25 (4), 26 (10+), 27-31
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 6-7, 10 (1♀), 21 (1♂)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 1-13, 17, 19-21, 23, 25-26, 28-31
     BROWN THRASHER: 2, 7 (3), 13, 31 (1)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-6, 10-11, 16, 18, 27-28
     CEDAR WAXWING: 2 (1), 6 (4), 7 (1), 8 (4), 10 (1), 12 (1), 21 (6), 25 (2)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-31
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-31
     SONG SPARROW: 1-31
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-31
     INDIGO BUNTING: 1-5, 7-21, 23, 25-26, 30
     DICKCISSEL: 1-20, 22, 24, 28-29
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-31
     EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 15 (1), 18, 20, 21 (1)
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-19, 21, 23-24, 28 (1), 30 (3)
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1-8, 10, 12-13, 16, 18-19, 21-22, 25-28, 31
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 2 (1♂), 3 (1), 5 (1), 6-7, 9, 10 (1♂ + 1♀), 12 (3♂), 15-16, 17 (1♂), 18 (1♀),
                                    20 (1♀), 27 (1)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 1-8, 10-12, 18, 25 (1)
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-31
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-31

MAMMALIAN
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 2-3 (1), 4 (1♀ w/1 fawn), 11 (1), 16 (1♀ w/1fawn), 21 (1♀ w/1 fawn),
                                    22-23 (1), 24 (2 fawns + 1♀), 25 (1♀ w/1 fawn), 27 (1♀ w/2 fawns)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 11-12, 17, 23, 25-26, 31
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 4, 7, 17-18
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 2-3, 5, 7-9, 11, 14, 16, 18-19, 21, 23, 25-26, 28-31
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-19, 21-31

REPTILIAN
     PLAINS GARTERN SNAKE: 24 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-2, 5, 8, 10-15, 17-20, 22-23, 25-31
     WESTERN SPINY SOFTSHELL: 14 (1), 20 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 4, 7, 12-13, 19, 21, 23, 26, 30-31
     BLANCHARD'S CRICKET FROG: 3-7, 9, 15, 17
     EASTERN GRAY TREE FROG: 3, 25
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 1, 29 (1)
     BULLFROG: 1-2, 4, 6-10, 12-13, 15-16, 21-23, 25-31
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 13, 21, 27-31

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 1, 3-4, 15-16, 18, 22, 25, 27
     GIANT SWALLOWTAIL: 26 (1)
     EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 6, 13, 16, 18 (1), 20-23, 25, 28-30
     CHECKERED WHITE: 11 (1)
     CABBAGE WHITE: 1, 3-4, 6-23, 25-31
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 1-4, 6-8, 10, 12-15, 17, 20-21, 23, 25-26, 29-31
     LITTLE YELLOW: 26-27, 29
     SULPHUR sp: 2-4, 6, 9, 12-13, 18-19, 21-23,2 5, 27-28, 31
     GRAY COPPER: 1-7, 10
     EASTERN TAILED-BLUE: 3-4, 12, 14, 22-31
     GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY: 4 (1), 6 (2), 7, 9-10, 13, 19
     GORGONE CHECKERSPOT: 4
     PEARL CRESCENT: 3-4, 12
     QUESTION MARK: 1, 15-16, 18
     MOURNING CLOAK: 1 (caterpillar), 4, 6 (2), 7 (4), 8 (2), 9, 10 (2), 12-13 (1), 14-15 (2), 16 (3),
                                    18 (2), 19 (1), 22 (2), 23 (1), 25-27 (1), 31 (1)
     PAINTED LADY: 17 (1)
     RED ADMIRAL: 1, 3-5, 9-10, 12-13, 16, 18, 20-22, 25-30
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 3 (1)
     RED-SPOTTED PURPLE: 3 (1)
     VICEROY: 4, 7, 9, 12, 15, 17, 21-22, 25-26, 28-29
     MONARCH: 1-4, 6-31
     CHICKWEED GEOMETER: 5, 8-9, 17-18

ODONATA
     BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 3-4, 8-10, 14-23, 25-31
     POWDERED DANCER: 10, 17-23, 25, 27-28, 30
     RAINBOW BLUET: 4, 7-9, 14-17, 22-23
     DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 3, 8-9, 14, 16-17, 19, 21, 23, 26-27, 29, 31
     TULE BLUET: 3, 7-10, 14-17, 19, 23, 25-26, 28, 30-31
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 3, 7, 9, 13, 15-23, 25-28, 30-31
     STREAM BLUET: 8, 14, 16, 19, 22-23, 31
     SKIMMING BLUET: 10, 26
     ORANGE BLUET: 8, 15-17, 22, 24, 27
     Bluet sp.: 1, 3-4, 9, 13-14, 17, 26, 29-31
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1-4, 11, 14-19, 21-31
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1, 3-4, 6-10, 12-23, 25-31
     JADE CLUBTAIL: 21 (1)
     FLAG-TAILED SPINYLEG: 10 (1♀), 23 (1♂), 25 (1♂), 28 (1), 30 (1)
     PLAINS CLUBTAIL: 4 (2)
     COMMON BASKETTAIL: 3, 7-8, 16-17
     PRINCE BASKETTAIL: 1, 4, 7, 9, 12, 16-22, 26, 28-31
     HALLOWEEN PENNANT: 1, 3-4, 7-10, 12-13, 16-23, 25-31
     EASTERN PONDHAWK: 1, 3-4, 7, 9, 14, 16-19, 27-29, 31
     WIDOW SKIMMER: 1, 3-4, 6-10, 12-23, 25-31
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 1, 3-4, 7-10, 12-16, 18, 22, 25-31
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 1-4, 7-10, 13-20, 22-23, 25-31
     BLUE DASHER: 1, 3-4, 8, 14-15, 19-21, 23, 30
     WANDERING GLIDER: 12, 18-19, 25, 29
     EASTERN AMBERWING: 4, 7-10, 13, 16-23, 25-31
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 1-3, 6, 8, 12-20, 22, 25-29, 31
     SAFFRON-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 31 (1♂)
     BAND-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 9 (1♀), 12-13 (1♀), 19 (1♀), 22 (1♀), 25 (1♀), 26, 28, 30
     AUTUMN MEADOWHAWK: 30 (1 im ♂)
     Meadowhawk sp.: 17, 30
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 1, 3-4, 7-10, 12, 17, 19-20, 23, 26-27, 30
     RED SADDLEBAGS: 3-4, 6-10, 13-14, 16-20, 23, 26-27, 29

ORTHOPTERA
     CAROLINA GRASSHOPPER: 22-23, 25-31


Wolf. Oesterreich

Friday, August 1, 2014

July 31, 2014: July 2014 Photo Collage


July 2014 photos from the blog by Tyler Harms, Kevin Kane, Erv Klaas, Wolf. Oesterreich, , and LaDan Omidvar.