Monday, June 30, 2014

June 29, 2014: Beautiful Summer Day




Summer clouds tower over the south lake, looking north from the south shore. 6/25/14 (Kevin Kane)

June 28, 2014: Gray Copper



Gray Copper. 6/20/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Gray Coppers can be found in the northern prairies, in moist meadows, drainage ditches, and along pond and stream edges.  They are uncommon to locally common, with a flight season of mid-June to mid-August.  Only one brood is produced.  Favorite larval food are docks, both native and introduced.

Saturday, June 28, 2014

June 27, 2014: Eastern Amberwing




 Eastern Amberwing. 6/18/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

The first Eastern Amberwing for this year was found on the 18th and then virtually every day since.  This male was found in the prairie area, northwest of Pond H. 6/18
Total Length = 20-25mm
Hindwing Length = 16-19mm
Flight Season = May - September

Wolf. Oesterreich

June 26, 2014: Thursday Storm



This morning's storm moves in from the southwest over the lakes. 6/26/14 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, June 26, 2014

June 25, 2014: Interpretive Talk





Bill Simpkins (left) and Lyle Hammes (right) talk about the hydrology of the park at the first summer interpretive talk. 6/25/16 (Kevin Kane)

Other summer talks are scheduled for:

July 10, 5:30pm : Deb Lewis on Prairie Plants
July 17, 6pm : Wolf Oesterreich and Erv Klaas on Dragons and Damsels.
August 14, 5:30pm : Jeff Kopaska on Urban Fishery
September 18, ?pm : Deb Lewis Readings on Prairies

Wednesday, June 25, 2014

June 24, 2014: Sunset Harvest




A bumblebee harvests pollen from the new flower of a Milkweed plant in the southwest wetland area. 6/23/14 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, June 24, 2014

June 23, 2014: Hayden Park News 14






Water pours from the  southwest wetlands into the south lake due to high rainfall amounts recently.  6/23/14 (Kevin Kane)
 
Dear Friends of Hayden Park:

The Parks Interpretive Coordinator, Heather Milder, has arranged several programs for the summer. The first one is


**  Wednesday, June 25, 2014, at 5:30 pm. **

The presenters will be Lyle Hammes and Bill Simpkins, on the topic of Water. Meet at the lake outlet on the SE corner of the park. Parking is available in Calhoun Park off of Dawes Drive.

Subsequent programs: (Tentative)

July 10, 5:30pm : Deb Lewis on Prairie Plants
July 17, 6pm : Wolf Oesterreich and Erv Klaas on Dragons and Damsels.
August 14, 5:30pm : Jeff Kopaska on Urban Fishery
September 18, ?pm : Deb Lewis Readings on Prairies

Erv Klaas

June 22, 2014: AHHP Butterfly Survey








 Gray Copper. 6/20/14 (Tyler Harms)

Summer has officially started, not that anyone needed a reminder with the warm weather we’ve experienced over the past week. However, although we may not always enjoy the sweltering hot days, the insects certainly do. I’ve seen a marked increase in insect activity on my visits to Ada Hayden Heritage Park over the last week and below I share photos of some of my recent butterfly sightings.

Upon a visit last Friday (6/20), I observed several Gray Coppers throughout the park. As you can see in the photo (top), these butterflies are grayish blue overall with several black spots below and an orange margin on the hindwing (the wing near the back of the insect’s body). If you look closely, its name becomes obvious by the hint of copper on the wing surface. These butterflies are quick fliers and often only offer a flash of gray to the eye when on the wing, but if you can track them in flight they will often land and allow excellent views. I photographed this individual obtaining minerals from wet gravel on the upland trail. Gray Coppers can be seen throughout June and July, but I suggest visiting the park now as they are abundant along the trails.

Below is a Painted Lady I photographed near Pond B on my visit on May 22. Sometimes known as the “Thistle Butterfly” for the adults’ preference of thistle flowers as a nectar source, the Painted Lady is found all over the world. Although not shown in my below photo, their upper-wing surface displays a pretty combination of orange, brown, and black with white spots. On the under-wing surface, the Painted Lady displays four “eyespots” (see in the photo). These eyespots are a great characteristic for identifying this species because a cousin to the Painted Lady, the American Painted Lady (I’ve also seen American Painted Ladies at the park this year), is very similar but has only two eyespots on the under-wing surface. Look for Painted Ladies throughout the summer in open areas around the park, but the best time to look for them is July-August.




Painted Lady. 6/20/14 (Tyler Harms)

One of my favorite butterflies, the Mourning Cloak (below), can be regularly found along the bluff on the north side of the south lake. Simple yet beautiful, the Mourning Cloak is brown-black overall with a maroon iridescence and a yellow border on the wing margins. This yellow margin is very visible and makes it easy to identify this butterfly in flight. The Mourning Cloak is one of the few butterfly species that overwinters in Iowa as adults, making them one of the first butterflies to be seen in spring. The Mourning Cloak is also unique in that it only occasionally will feed on nectar; it most often feeds on rotting fruit or tree sap. Mourning Cloaks can be seen until frost in forested areas of the park.




 Mourning Cloak. 6/20/14 (Tyler Harms)

Let’s finish this post with a vibrant and highly visible butterfly that is a treat to observe floating by, the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. Although I did not photograph this individual at the park, I’ve seen several on my recent visits. As its name implies, the Eastern Tiger Swallowtail is a large, yellow butterfly with black tiger-like stripes on the upper-wing surface. They are about the size of the well-known Monarch butterfly. A close-up view of this beauty allows one to observe the long tail-like projections of the hindwing which also contributes to its name. Eastern Tiger Swallowtails can be seen in open areas near trees throughout the park.




Eastern Tiger Swallowtail.  6/20/14 (Tyler Harms)

As we embark on the summer season, keep a look out for the invertebrate beauties. I’ve observed more than 20 species of butterflies at the park this year and I hope to see many more before frost. Butterflies come in all shapes, sizes and colors and can be quite fun to see on a walk or bike through the park. So keep a look out for our invertebrate beauties and feel free to email me (tyharms AT gmail.com) with any observations or questions!

Tyler Harms

June 21, 2014: Dickcissel



Dickcissels are commonly found along the Upland Trail during late Spring and Summer.  This male was singing up a storm. 6/20/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

June 20, 2014: Northern Spiny Softshell



Northern Spiny Softshell Turtle.  6/18/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This Northern Spiny Softshell Turtle was found on the lakes trail, east of the bridge and just north of the trail junction. Softshells are flat and leathery. This apparent female, about the size of a dessert platter, had a smooth shell, with cone-like projections at the front of the carapace. They are known to bite and scratch, but this one was quite docile when I picked her up, carried her to the edge of water, and then released her. She moved slowly through the submerged rip-rap and vegetation and then shot off when she reached open water.

Friday, June 20, 2014

June 19, 2014: Thursday Storm


This line of clouds was the leading edge of the deluge that followed late this afternoon. We are looking north across the south lake's west bay. 6/19/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, June 19, 2014

June 18, 2014: Canada Geese





Here's the same Canada Goose family observed almost a month later from the initial posting. The goslings are starting to obtain some of the adult coloration. Only three pairs were successful (with 2, 3, & 4 goslings). Two goslings have been lost, but I don't know from which family. 6/15/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, June 18, 2014

June 17, 2014: Fawn

While searching for and removing Musk Thistles from the landscape, my daughter (Annamarie) and I stumbled upon this White-tailed Deer fawn below the "Circle of Life" (Upland Trail). 6/14/14 (Anamarie Oesterreich)

Wolf. Oesterreich

June 16, 2014: North Lake



Sunny day on the north lake -- looking west from the east shore.  6/6/14 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, June 17, 2014

June 15, 2014: Gray Tree Frog





There are two species of Gray Tree frogs in our area. However, they can only be separated by determining their number of chromosomes (a highly unlikely endeavor) or by voice. I have been hearing Easterns and not Cope's. 6/8/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

June 14, 2014: Twelve-spotted Skimmer



This female Twelve-spotted Skimmer was found in the grassy areas along the north side of Jensen Pond. Note the absence of the white spots on the wings that the male has.

Total Length = 52-57mm; Hindwing Length = 42-46mm; Flight Season = May - Sep

6/8/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, June 14, 2014

June 13, 2014: Hayden Park News #13 - Calling the Thistle Patrol




Musk thistle - beautiful but invasive!  6/16/12 (Dave Brotherson)

To the Musk Thistle Corps and other volunteers:

It is that time again. The invasive musk thistle is blooming. This will be the third year of control measures and we are making progress. The dense patch on the north bank of the west arm of the south lake is greatly reduced. Jon Hunstock has started cutting in that area. These thistles can be found in many places in the park and last year's crew did a great job of finding them.

If you have not done this before here are the basics. Clip off the flowering head and put it in a bucket or trash bag and take away. Last year, I put them in my compost pile. We have discovered that flowering heads can still produce a few or many viable seeds. After clipping the head, either pull the plant up by the root or cut the stalk off at the ground level. Jon tells me that the ground is soft enough after the rains to pull most of them. Leaving the root in the ground will diminish its ability to produce a flowering stalk in a year or two but it may survive. The goal is to eliminate the production of seed and eventually we should get it under control.

Wear long sleeves and heavy gloves the spines are prickly. Also, avoid contact with wild parsnip that grows in the same areas with the thistle. The plant juices from parsnip can cause blistering on bare skin.

I have a curved plant hook that works best. A sharp garden hoe or spade will also work but not as good. Let me know if you can help with this project in the next week or two.

Erv Klaas

June 12, 2014: Sails in the Sunset



A sailboat glides across the north lake in the late evening sun. 6/12/14 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, June 12, 2014

June 11, 2014: Kids Outdoor Day on June 14th







A young fisherman on the north lake.

‘Kids Outdoor Day’ at Ada Hayden Park

Children age 15 and younger are invited to participate in JAX Outdoor Gear’s “Kids Outdoor Day” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 14, at Ada Hayden Heritage Park in Ames.

Registration is free at the North Shelter House throughout the event. All registered participants are eligible to enter a raffle. Prizes will be presented at 2pm. Winners needs not be present to win.

JAX will provide wax worms for bait, and young anglers are encouraged to bring their own rods and tackle, but those who want to fish and don’t have a pole, there will be loaners available. Besides fishing, kids can try out different outdoor activities such as disc golf and soccer.

Hy-Vee will provide free lunch for participants. For more information, call JAX Outdoor Gear at (515) 292-2276.
June 14
‘Kids Outdoor Day’ at Ada Hayden Park
Children age 15 and younger are invited to participate in JAX Outdoor Gear’s “Kids Outdoor Day” from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Saturday, June 14, at Ada Hayden Heritage Park in Ames.
Registration is free at the North Shelter House throughout the event. All registered participants are eligible to enter a raffle. Prizes will be presented at 2pm. Winners needs not be present to win.
JAX will provide wax worms for bait, and young anglers are encouraged to bring their own rods and tackle, but those who want to fish and don’t have a pole, there will be loaners available. Besides fishing, kids can try out different outdoor activities such as disc golf and soccer.
Hy-Vee will provide free lunch for participants. For more information, call JAX Outdoor Gear at (515) 292-2276.
- See more at: http://amestrib.com/sports/outdoors/outdoors-briefs-14#sthash.hHs4KED4.dpuf

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

June 10, 2014: Viceroy



The Viceroy (Limenitis archippus) is a mimic of the Monarch.  It can be separated by its smaller size and the postmedian black line that runs across the veins of the hindwing. 6/10/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

June 09, 2014: Widow Skimmer



This female Widow Skimmer was found on the north side of Jensen Pond, in the grassy areas.
Total Length = 42-50mm; Hindwing Length = 38-40mm; Flight Season = May-Oct. 6/8/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

Sunday, June 8, 2014

June 07, 2014: Wolf's May 2014 Wildlife Report








This drake Common Merganser has been hanging around the SE corner of the south lake for over a week, setting a new late Spring record for Story County. [A digiscoped photo.] 5/20/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 141 avian species (+ 3 sp.) was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 3rd highest May among 17 years of records. The Blue-winged Warbler (#265) and the White-eyed Vireo (#266) were added to my Park List.

Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the drake American Wigeon sighted on the 3rd may represent a new extreme late Spring record for Story County (former record set on 27 April 1983 at Hendrickson Marsh, and 2006 & 2008 at AHHP). The Common Merganser observed from the 19th through the 31st (former record set on 10 May 2011 at AHHP) may also represent a new late Spring record. The 3 Black-necked Stilts are probably only the 2nd record for the County, with the 1st also found at the Park in 2004 (15-18 May). White-eyed Vireos were once quite common in Story County. The sighting this month may only be the 4th record in more recent times (13 May 1979, 11 May 1991, & 22 May 2000). The White-throated Sparrow observation on the 23rd tied the late Spring record (set in 1983 at Brookside Park).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard). The order follows the 54th Supplement (2013) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 13th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-31
     WOOD DUCK: 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 11 (3♂), 14 (1♂), 23-24 (1♀), 27, 28 (1♀), 29 (1♂), 30 (6)
     GADWALL: 4 (9), 19 (1♂ + 1♀)
     AMERICAN WIGEON: 3 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-31
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1 (38+), 2 (51+), 3 (236+), 4 (192+), 5 (17+), 6 (22+), 7 (15+), 8 (32+), 9 (28),      
                                    11 (24), 12 (8), 13 (5), 14, 15 (4), 16 (12), 17 (21), 18 (7), 19 (2), 21 (3), 22 (12),
                                    23 (6), 24 (3), 25 (4), 27 (12), 28 (10), 29 (2)
     NORTHERN SHOVELER: 1 (104+), 2 (10+), 3 (20+), 4 (43+), 5 (5+), 6 (2), 7 (3), 8 (8+), 9 (5),
                                    11 (2♂), 12 (3♂ + 1♀), 13 (9), 14, 16 (1♂), 17 (4♂), 18 (2♂ + 1♀), 21 (6),
                                    22 (2♂ + 1♀), 23-24 (2♂), 25-26 (3♂), 27-30 (1♂)
     GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 1 (1)
     LESSER SCAUP: 1 (1♂ + 1♀)
     COMMON MERGANSER: 19-26 (1♂), 28-29 (1♂), 31 (1♂)
     RED-BREASTED MERGANSER: 1 (1♂)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1-9, 11-24, 25 (+ 1 BY), 26-31
     COMMON LOON: 1 (2), 2 (1), 4-10 (1)
     PIED-BILLED GREBE: 1 (6), 2 (3), 3 (4), 4 (6), 5 (3), 6 (2), 7 (3), 12 (2), 15-16 (1)
     HORNED GREBE: 1 (5), 2 (9), 4-5 (1)
     RED-NECKED GREBE: 1 (2)
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 2 (1), 3 (12), 16 (1), 20 (3), 25 (1)
     AMERICAN BITTERN: 28 (1)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (5), 2 (2), 3 (1), 4 (3), 5 (2), 6 (1), 8 (2), 9 (1), 11 (1), 12-13 (2), 14-15 (1),
                                    16 (3), 17-20 (1), 21 (3), 22 (1), 23 (4), 24 (3), 25 (1), 26 (2), 27-28 (3), 29 (2),
                                    30 (3), 31 (2)
     GREAT EGRET: 1 (5), 2 (4), 31 (2)
     GREEN HERON: 1-3 (1), 4-5 (2), 6-7 (3), 10 (1), 11 (2), 12 (1), 14 (1), 18 (1), 22 (2), 23-25 (1)
     BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: 4 (2 ad), 8 (2 ad)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (7+), 2 (18+), 3 (9+), 4 (6+), 5 (8+), 6 (6+), 7 (7+), 8 (1), 11 (2), 12 (12), 13 (6),
                                    14, 15 (1), 19 (1), 20 (4), 23 (4), 24 (1), 26 (1), 27 (8)
     OSPREY: 1-4 (2), 5 (1), 7 (1), 11 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 1 (1 ad + 1 im), 3 (1 ad), 9 (1 im), 11 (2 ad), 13-15 (1 ad), 19 (1 ad), 23-24 (1 ad),
                                    26 (1 ad), 31 (1 ad)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 15 (1), 20 (1), 12 (1 ad), 24 (1), 26 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (2), 2-3 (1), 4 (2), 5-8 (1), 9 (3), 11 (1), 12 (2), 13 (1), 14 (2), 16 (2), 17, 18 (1),
                                    19-20, 21-22 (2), 23-27 (1), 28 (2), 29-31 (1)
     SORA: 4-7 (1), 8 (2), 9 (1), 11 (2), 13 (1), 18 (1), 26 (1)
     AMERICAN COOT: 1 (26+), 2 (25+), 3 (32+), 4 (36+), 5 (12+), 6 (7), 7 (3), 8 (10), 9 (3), 12-13 (1),
                                    14 (2), 15-17 (1), 22 (1), 26 (1), 30 (1)
     KILLDEER: 1 (1), 3 (1), 6 (2), 7 (3), 8 (1), 15 (1), 17 (2), 18 (6), 19, 22 (1), 23 (3), 24 (1), 25, 27 (3),
                                    29 (6), 30 (3), 31 (1)
     BLACK-NECKED STILT: 4 (3)
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 (6), 2 (1), 3 (2), 4-6 (1), 8-9 (1), 11 (1), 14 (4), 15-16 (1), 18-19 (1), 23 (2),
                                    24 (1), 25 (3), 27 (1)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 2 (11)
     LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 2 (2), 3 (19+), 4, 7 (5+), 8 (9+), 9 (7+), 22 (7), 23 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 9, 18 (10+), 28 (5)
     LEAST SANDPIPER: 9 (3), 18 (~25), 19, 28 (4)
     WHITE-RUMPED SANDPIPER: 18 (1)
     BAIRD’S SANDPIPER: 18 (2)
     PECTORAL SANDPIPER: 3 (5+), 4, 9 (4), 12 (5+), 18 (8), 19
     Sandpiper sp.: 17 (~25)
     WILSON’S SNIPE: 1 (1), 6 (1)
     WILSON’S PHALAROPE: 8 (4), 9 (2)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 2 (1), 4 (8), 6 (3), 12 (3), 17 (9)
     FRANKLIN’S GULL: 12 (3)
     CASPIAN TERN: 15 (4)
     FORSTER’S TERN: 4 (3)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-9, 11-31
     COMMON NIGHTHAWK: 28 (1)
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 1, 9 (2+), 11, 13-16
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 18 (1♂)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 14 (1), 16 (1), 18 (1)
     RED-HEADED WOODPECKER: 9 (1 ad), 18 (1 ad), 23-24 (1)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 3-4, 9, 11-12, 14-19, 25-26, 30
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1-7, 9, 11-20, 23, 25, 29-30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 9, 13
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1 (2), 3-5 (1), 7 (1), 11-13 (1), 14, 15-17 (1), 18, 20, 25,
                                    27 (1), 30-31 (1)
     AMERICAN KESTREL: 1 (1♀)
     Falcon sp: 2 (1)
     OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 26 (1)
     EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 25-26 (1), 31 (1)
     YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER: 28 (1)
     ALDER FLYACTCHER: 26 (2), 27-29 (1)
     LEAST FLYCATCHER: 5 (3), 6-8 (1), 9 (4), 11 (2), 12 (3), 13 (1), 14, 15 (1), 16 (4), 17 (3), 18 (4),
                                    19 (1), 21-22 (1), 23 (2), 24 (1)
     Empidonax sp.: 15 (1), 21 (1), 24 (2), 26 (1), 28 (2)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 3 (1), 11 (1), 18 (1)
     GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 15 (1), 26 (1 BY), 29-30 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 3-5 (1), 7 (2), 11 (2), 12 (5), 18 (2), 20 (2), 21 (1), 22-23 (2), 27 (1), 29 (1),
                                    30 (3), 31 (1)
     WHITE-EYED VIREO: 11 (1), 13-14 (1), 16 (1)
     BLUE-HEADED VIREO: 4 (1), 17 (1)
     WARBLING VIREO: 4-5 (2), 6 (3), 7 (7+), 9, 11-12, 17 (1), 18 (2), 19-31
     PHILADELPHIA VIREO: 19-20 (1), 31 (1)
     RED-EYED VIREO: 8 (1), 21 (1), 24 (4), 26
     BLUE JAY: 1-4, 6-7, 9, 11, 13-19, 22-27, 29, 31
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-9, 11-26, 29-31
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-9, 11-31
     TREE SWALLOW: 1-9, 11-31
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLLOW: 2-4, 8-9. 11-13, 15-16
     BANK SWALLOW: 1-2, 6, 8-9, 12-13, 15-19
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 1, 4, 9, 11-13, 15-16, 23 (1), 25
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-9, 11-31
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-9, 11-25, 27-31
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 3-4, 6, 9, 12, 14-15, 17-18, 20, 23-26, 30
     HOUSE WREN: 1 (1), 3 (4), 4-9, 11-31
     MARSH WREN: 8 (1), 9 (2), 16 (1)
     RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET: 1 (2), 2 (1), 3 (3), 4 (9+), 5-6 (2), 7 (3), 8 (1), 12-14 (1), 16-17 (1), 23 (1)
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 (1♂ + 1♀), 3 (1♀), 6 (1♂), 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 13 (1♀), 16 (1♂), 21 (1♀), 23 (1♂),
                                    25 (1♂), 26 (1♂ + 1♀), 27 (1♀)
     GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH: 12 (1), 16 (1)
     SWAINSON’S THRUSH: 4 (1), 6-7 (1), 11-12 (2), 13 (6), 14, 15 (1), 16 (10), 17 (1), 19-20 (1)
     HERMIT THRUSH: 1 (1)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 2 (1), 6-7 (1), 8-9 (2), 11-31
     BROWN THRASHER: 1 (2), 3 (1 BY + 1), 4 (3 BY + 2), 5 (2 BY + 1), 6 (2 BY), 7 (1), 9 (1),
                                    11 (2 BY + 2), 13 (2), 16 (1 + 1 BY), 17 (1), 18 (1 BY), 20 (1), 21 (2), 22 (1),
                                    23 (1 BY + 1), 24 (1 BY + 4), 25 (4), 26-27 (1), 28 (3), 29 (1), 30 (3)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-9, 11-31
     CEDAR WAXWING: 17 (1), 31 (2)
     OVENBIRD: 1 (1), 4 (2), 5-6 (1), 8 (1), 12 (1), 15 (1)
     LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH: 16 (1)
     NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH: 1 (1), 4 (1), 16 (3), 17 (1), 26 (1)
     BLUE-WINGED WARBLER: 9 (1)
     BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 4 (2), 16 (1), 19 (1)
     PROTHONOTARY WARBLER: 23 (1♂)
     TENNESSEE WARBLER: 12 (1), 17 (2)
     ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 5 (1), 9 (3), 11 (1), 14, 15 (1), 16 (3), 18-19 (1)
     NASHVILLE WARBLER: 4 (1), 8 (1♂), 11 (1), 16 (5), 17-18 (1)
     MOURNING WARBLER: 20 (1)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1 (1♂), 5 (3♂), 6 (2♂), 7 (3♂), 8 (4♂ + 1♀), 9 (5♂), 11-31
     AMERICAN REDSTART: 8 (1♂), 11 (2♂ BY), 12 (5), 13 (3), 15 (2), 16 (1), 18 (4), 19 (2), 20 (6),
                                    21 (2), 22 (4), 24 (1), 26 (3), 27 (1), 29 (1♀)
     CAPE MAY WARBLER: 11 (1)
     NORTHERN PARULA: 11 (1)
     MAGNOLIA WARBLER: 12-13 (1), 16 (3), 17-18 (1), 22 (2)
     BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER: 19 (1♂)
     YELLOW WARBLER: 2 (1), 4 (1), 7 (1♂), 8-9 (2♂), 11 (6), 12 (9), 13 (2), 14, 15 (1), 16 (3), 17 (1),
                                    18 (2), 21 (1), 22 (4), 23-24 (2), 26 (1), 30 (1), 31 (2)
     CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER: 11 (2), 13 (1), 15 (2). 18 (1), 20-21 (1)
     BLACKPOLL WARBLER: 12-13 (1), 16 (1)
     PALM WARBLER: 1-2 (6), 3 (7), 4 (5+), 5 (1), 6 (4), 8 (1), 9 (3), 11 (1), 15 (3), 16 (1), 18 (1)
     YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Myrtle): 1 (8), 2 (4), 3 (4+), 5 (2), 6 (1), 8-9 (1), 11 (2), 12 (1), 15 (1)
     CANADA WARBLER: 11 (1), 18 (1)
     WILSON’S WARBLER: 6 (1♂), 8 (1♂), 9 (4♂), 11 (5), 12 (1), 14, 15 (1), 16 (10), 17 (4), 18 (1), 20 (1),
                                    23 (1), 26 (1)
     EASTERN TOWHEE: 9 (1♀), 22 (1)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-9, 11-31
     CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: 1 (6), 3 (1), 4 (2), 6 (1), 8 (2), 9 (3), 12 (2), 15 (6), 16 (7+), 17 (2)
     FIELD SPARROW: 1 (2), 2 (1), 3 (2), 7 (1), 9 (1)
     VESPER SPARROW: 1 (1), 4 (1)
     LARK SPARROW: 18 (2)
     SAVANNAH SPARROW: 1 (2), 2 (1), 15 (1)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-9, 11-31
     LINCOLN’S SPARROW: 2-3 (1 BY), 4 (9+), 5 (1 BY + 1), 7 (2), 8 (1 BY + 1), 9 (3 + 1 BY),
                                    11 (1 BY +1), 12 (1 BY + 2), 13 (2), 14 (1), 15 (3), 16 (8+), 17 (3 + 1 BY), 23 (2)
     SWAMP SPARROW: 1 (4), 3 (3), 4 (5+), 5 (3), 12 (1), 16 (1)
     WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: 1-9, 14, 23 (1)
     HARRIS’S SPARROW: 1 (1), 4 (3), 7 (1 + 2 BY), 12-13 (1), 14 (1 BY), 15-16 (2), 17 (1)
     WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW: 1 (1), 2-3 (1 BY), 4 (3 BY + 1), 5 (2 BY + 1), 6 (2 BY), 7 (8 BY + 3),
                                    8-9 (2 BY), 11 (4 BY), 12 (2 BY), 13 (4 + 1 BY), 16 (1), 18 (1)
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-9, 11-31
     ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 7 (1♀ BY), 11 (2♂ + 2♀ + 1♀ BY), 12, 14 (1♂ + 1♂ BY), 15 (2),
                                    16 (1♂ + 2♀), 18 (1♂ BY), 29 (1♂)
     INDIGO BUNTING: 7 (1♂ BY), 22 (1♀), 24 (1♀), 26 (1♀), 28, 31
     DICKCISSEL: 29 (4), 30-31
     BOBOLINK: 25 (2♂)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-9, 11-31
     EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 3-9, 11, 13-14, 16, 19, 21-25, 28, 30-31
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-9, 11-31
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1, 3-9, 11-14, 16-31
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 26 (1st Spring ♂), 27 (1♀), 28 (1♂), 30 (1♂ + 1 1st Spring ♂)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 5 (1♂), 6 (4♂), 7 (5+ ♂), 8-9, 11-31
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-9, 11-31
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-9, 11-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-9, 11-31

MAMMALIAN
     STRIPED SKUNK:
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (3), 2 (5), 3 (6), 4-5 (1), 6 (7), 7 (2), 11 (1), 20 (4), 22 (1), 23 (3),
                                    27 (1 + 1 BY), 31 (1)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 2-5, 9, 11-12, 16-18, 21, 23-26
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 3, 16, 21, 24-25, 27
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 3-4, 11, 16, 25-26, 29
     MUSKRAT: 14 (1)
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-7, 9, 11-31

REPTILIAN
     Garter snake sp.: 6 (1), 16 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 2-7, 9, 12-14, 16-26, 28-30
     RED-EARED SLIDER: 3-4 (1), 6 (1), 9 (1), 17-18 (1), 22 (1), 24 (1), 27 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 5-7, 11-12, 17-21, 23-24, 27, 30
     BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 26-31
     EASTERN GRAY TREEFROG: 7, 12, 20-21, 23-27, 29-30
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 1-7, 9, 11-23, 25-26
     BULLFROG: 26 (1), 28
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 2-3, 5, 16

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 3 (1), 9 (2), 20, 21 (1), 24, 26 (1), 28 (1), 31 (1)
     EASTERM TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 8-9 (1), 18 (1), 22 (1), 31 (1)
     CHECKERED WHITE: 20 (1), 26-27 (1)
     CABBAGE WHITE: 3-4 (2), 5, 7, 22-23
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 7
     Sulphur sp.: 6 (1), 7 (2), 8-9, 11, 21, 23-25, 27, 30-31
     PEARL CRESCENT: 29 (1)
     MOURNING CLOAK: 3-8 (1), 20 (2), 21 (1), 22-23 (2), 27 (1)
     AMERICAN LADY: 3 (2), 23 (1)
     RED ADMIRAL: 2-3 (2), 4 (1), 5-6 (2), 17 (4), 18 (2), 20 (1), 21 (2), 22 (1), 24, 26, 29
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 22 (1)
     MONARCH: 20 (3), 21 (2), 22 (3), 23 (4), 26 (6), 27 (3), 28-29 (6), 30 (3), 31 (2)
     CELERY LOOPER: 8

ODONATE
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 21
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 23, 26, 29-31
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 2-3, 5-7, 9, 18 (1), 20-31
     DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE: 30-31
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 30
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 2-3, 5, 29-30
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 29-31

Wolf. Oesterreich

June 06, 2014: Early Morning Mist



A NE view into the Park from my house showing an early morning mist. 6/6/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Jun 05, 2014: Path to Jensen Pond



The sun casts shadows over the hills on the path to Jensen Pond.  5/21/14 (Kevin Kane)

Jun 04, 2014: Red-winged Blackbird



A red-winged blackbird perches in a tree at the base of the northern hills. 5/21/14 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Jun 03, 2014: Red-tailed Hawk Chick



This photo shows one of the two rapidly-growing Red-tailed Hawk chicks found at the Park.  Just 1.5 weeks ago they were still covered in downy feathers. 6/1/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, June 2, 2014

Jun 02, 2014: Twelve-spotted Skimmer

My first Twelve-spotted Skimmer of the year was found Friday (5/30) at Jensen Pond.  This skimmer gets its name from the three dark splotches on each wing.  Other Odonates at the pond include Eastern Forktail, Common Green Darner, Dot-tailed Whiteface, and Black Saddlebags. 5/30/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Jun 01, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #67










 SW wetlands looking NE across south lake. 5/27/14 (Kevin Kane)

Sunday, June 1, 2014. 2-4 pm.
Sunny, strong southerly breeze, 88 degrees F.

I first went to the north side to look for dragonflies along the north shore of the lake. There were white-caps on the lake and lapping against the shoreline. The conditions for viewing these insects was not good, so I drove around to the south side and walked the shore line of the west arm of the south lake. This area was protected by trees from the south wind. Odonates have been slow to appear this spring; in most years, several species are flying by now. The first species to appear this year were Common Green Darners and Variegated Meadowhawks which I reported on in my last field note. These two species are believed to be migratory and emerged from the water someplace far to the south. Species that overwinter in the park as aquatic larvae are dependent on rising water temperatures to emerge as adults in the spring.

I was pleased to see four adult Familiar Bluets (damselflies) a few days ago. Today, I saw two more Familiar Bluets, 15 male and 2 female Eastern Forktails and a Black Saddlebag dragonfly. The Eastern Forktail is a small damselfly that is one of the first species to emerge each spring. It can be seen all summer and as late as October. It is possible that it goes through several generations in a season. It has a wide distribution over eastern North America. I have seen it in Maine, Quebec, and Ontario. The male is very distinctive with a bright green thorax and a black abdomen tipped in blue. They can be found flitting about in vegetation near the water’s edge.

The water in the lake was very clear today and the water level above normal. The path I usually walk along on this shoreline was flooded in places. New paths have been trampled through the vegetation by fisherman. I found evidence of their presence in empty beer cans, discarded live bait containers, and monofilament line.

I have been working with Jim Pease to draft a plan for vegetative management in the park. The draft has been submitted to the Parks Director for review. The long term master plan is to restore native ecosystems and these must be managed to protect them from non-native invasive species. The word heritage was included in the name of the park partly to honor Iowa conservationists but also to recognize our native wetlands, prairies, and savannas. The Friends of Hayden Park planted 700 native shrubs last spring and another 700 this spring. We selected a diversity of species that will provide fruit and nuts for wildlife in the coming years.

Look for an announcement soon of a summer nature interpretive program.

Erv Klaas