Thursday, July 31, 2014

July 30, 2014: Queen Anne's Lace


Queen Anne's Lace.  7/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Although considered a secondary noxious weed in Iowa, the Queen Anne's Lace (Daucus carota) is still enjoyed by many people. The flower can be found throughout the Park. This plant is a member of the celery, parsley, and carrot family (Apiaceae, formally Umbelliferae). The inflorescence is actually a compound umbel, terminating in small white flowers. As the inflorescence ages the umbels curve into a ball (right photo) which can be described as a "bird's nest".


Wolf. Oesterreich

Wednesday, July 30, 2014

July 29, 2014: Peck’s Skipper




Do you see what I see?  A Peck’s Skipper nestled into a Wild Bergamot flower. 7/28/14 (Tyler Harms)

Tuesday, July 29, 2014

July 28, 2014: Purple Coneflower



One of at least three coneflower species found at the Park, the Purple Coneflower (Echinacea purpurea) is probably the least common. ( The Pale Purple Coneflower and Gray-headed Coneflower are more abundant.) This species blooms from late May to October. 7/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, July 28, 2014

July 27, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #70



 Eastern Forktail. 4/26/12 (Erv Klaas)

Sunday, July 20, 2014, Sunny and warm, slight southerly breeze, Temperature 84 degrees F.

I took a walk with my camera today looking for (you guessed it) dragons and damsels. I parked in the southwest parking lot and walked the rustic trail along the southern shore of the west arm of the south lake. This is not a maintained trail but one created by fishermen and dragon hunters. Part of the trail has been flooded by high water for several weeks but today it was dry and overgrown with tall vegetation, mostly reed canary grass. Pondweed has increased just off shore and is beginning to produce fruiting bodies. This plant can grow in several feet of clear water. It produces tubers in the bottom sediment and sends up long stems to the surface with large oval floating leaves. Fruiting bodies (not exactly flowers) project above the water and are about one-half inch in diameter and six inches to eight inches long. Both dragonflies and damselflies like to perch on these fruiting bodies and lay eggs among the floating leaves. Pondweeds provide underwater habitat for a variety of aquatic organisms including small fish which can escape predators and also find food.

I saw the following species of dragonflies: Widow Skimmer (8 males and 1 female laying eggs), Eastern Pondhawk (4 males), Eastern Amberwing (8 males), Common Green Darner (5 males and 1 pair laying eggs), Halloween Pennant (3 males), Flag-tailed Spineyleg (1 female). The Spineyleg was flying ahead of me and hiding in the tall grass. Finally, I was able to approach close enough to get several photographs. This dragonfly is large and colorfully marked with a club tail. The male’s tail is bright orange and red.

I saw the following damselflies: Eastern Forktail (4 males, 3 females, 4 immatures), Familiar Bluet (2 males, and 1 pair), one unidentified Bluet (still trying to identify it from photo.

The following texts accompany photos taken by others and published on Kevin Kane’s blog. You can view these at http://adahaydenpark.blogspot.com/.
Erv Klaas

The prairies are blooming beautifully right now with several colorful species of wildflowers. This is a great time to enjoy nature’s art and look for butterflies and other pollinators amongst the flowers!
- Tyler Harms.

Currently, there are three milkweed species blooming at the Park (Swamp, Butterfly, & Common). The Swamp Milkweed (left) can be found in prairie areas with moist soil and along the edges of prairie potholes. They bloom July through August. The Butterfly Milkweed (center) can be found in dry, open areas. Of the three, this is the most abundant milkweed present at the Park. Numerous plants are found along the east side of the main lakes and to the north of Ponds N and M. This species blooms from June to September. The Common Milkweed (right) can be found throughout the Park. –Wolf. Oesterreich

Purple Prairie Clover is in bloom in many areas of the Park, especially along east side of the main lakes. This member of the legume family (Fabaceae) is found througout the Midwest, in native prairies and relics on well-drained or dry soils. 7/11/14 –Wolf. Oesterreich.

Numerous Rattlesnake Master plants, a member of the Parsley family (Apiaceae), can be found in the prairie areas of the Park. Each "head" contains many flowers and when in bloom, the white bracts will be quite visible. So far I have not found any plant in bloom, but they are close. 7/6/14—Wolf. Oesterreich.

Thursday, July 24, 2014

July 24, 2014: Today!! Butterflies of Ada Hayden Park



 Eastern Tiger Swallowtail. (Tyler Harms)

Today, Thursday, July 24th!! Discover the diversity in butterflies at Ada Hayden with Tyler Harms, who has completed butterfly surveys at the park. Meet at the north shelter at 5:30pm

July 23, 2014: Carolina Grasshopper



Carolina Grasshopper. 7/23/14 (Wolf Oesterreich)

This Carolina Grasshopper (Dissosteira carolina) is still in the nymph stage (notice the short wings), although it shouldn't be long before it becomes an adult (after at least one more molt). Carolina Grasshoppers are found throughout America north of Mexico. There is a pronounced crest along the "collar" (pronotum) behind the head, with a single notch., a diagnostic of the species. They can be quite large, with a wingspan up to 4 inches across. The black hindwings are bordered with yellow, which is what most people first observe, as the body color usually blends in with the ground. Some individuals can be reddish-brown (this specimen).


Wolf. Oesterreich

July 22, 2014: Culver's Root

Culver's Root. 7/9/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

This is the first year that I have seen Culver's Root (Family Plantaginaceae) at the Park.  The first population was found along the west side of Pond M and at least 2 others were found on Deb Lewis's prairie flower walk last Thursday night, near the Harrison Rd parking lot.  (This was also the first time she had observed this species at the Park.)

Culver's Root is a native. clumping perennial wildflower that grows well in moist to wet meadows and prairies.  It is found from Manitoba south to Texas and in all the states eastward to the Atlantic Ocean.  This plant grows 3 to 6 feet tall, has whorled leaves (3 to 7 leaves) that can be up to 6 inches long, and blooms from July to September.

(Beebalm (Monarda fistula) plants are blooming in the background.)

Wolf. Oesterreich

Monday, July 21, 2014

July 20, 2014: AHHP Prairie in Bloom


AHHP Prairie in Bloom. 7/17/14 (Tyler Harms)

The prairies are blooming beautifully right now with several colorful species of wildflowers.  This is a great time to enjoy nature’s art and look for butterflies and other pollinators amongst the flowers!
- Tyler Harms

July 19, 2014: The Milkweeds of AHHP



Milkweeds of Ada Hayden Heritage Park. 7/19/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Currently, there are three milkweed species blooming at the Park (Swamp, Butterfly, & Common). The Swamp Milkweed (left) can be found in prairie areas with moist soil and along the edges of prairie potholes. They bloom July through August. The Butterfly Milkweed (center) can be found in dry, open areas. Of the three, this is the most abundant milkweed present at the Park. Numerous plants are found along the east side of the main lakes and to the north of Ponds N and M. This species blooms from June to September. The Common Milkweed (right) can be found throughout the Park.


All three are members of the Milkweed family Asclepiadaceae. The genus Asclepias comes from the name of the Greek god of healing and medicine.

Sunday, July 20, 2014

July 18, 2014: Purple Prairie Clover


Purple Prairie Clover is in bloom in many areas of the Park, especially along east side of the main lakes.  This member of the legume family (Fabaceae) is found througout the Midwest, in native prairies and relics on well-drained or dry soils.  7/11/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

July 17, 2014: Rattlesnake Master


Numerous Rattlesnake Master plants, a member of the Parsley family (Apiaceae), can be found in the prairie areas of the Park.  Each "head" contains many flowers and when in bloom, the white bracts will be quite visible.  So far I have not found any plant in bloom, but they are close.  7/6/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Thursday, July 17, 2014

July 16, 2014: Question Mark







The photograph on the left shows the underside of the Question Mark (Polygonia interrogationis).  The white crescent and dot for which this butterfly is named is clearly visible.  The right photograph shows the upperside.  The forewing is hooked with a red-orange upperside and black spots.  The hindwing is mostly black with a short violet-tipped tail.  There is a Summer and Winter form (more orange on upperside and a longer tail).  This specimen is of the Summer form. 7/15/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Adults are attracted to rotting fruit, tree sap, dung, and carrion.  Only when these are unavailable will the Question Mark visit flowers such as Common Milkweed and asters.  The Summer form emerges and flies from May to September, laying eggs that will develop into the Winter form, which will appear in late August.

Wolf. Oesterreich

July 15, 2014: Under the Bridge

Sunset from under the bridge while canoeing. 7/4/14 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, July 15, 2014

July 14, 2014: Red Milkweed Beetle



Red Milkweed Beetles, a member of the Long-horned Beetle Family (Cerambycidae), are highly dependent on Common Milkweed (Asclepias syriaca), although they can be found on other milkweed species.  In early Summer, the female lays eggs at the base of a milkweed stem, sometimes inserting them into the stem.  By either tunneling down beneath the outer layer of the stem or by burrowing through the soil the newly hatched larvae find the milkweed roots.  They will dwell in the soil, feeding on the root, through early Fall.  They will overwinter in the root and may resume feeding briefly in Spring before pupating. 6/24/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, July 14, 2014

July 13, 2014: Tall Cinquefoil



Tall Cinquefoils, a member of the Rose family, are in bloom in the north prairie.  However, I did not find many individuals.  I came upon this one while removing a small patch of Musk Thistles. 7/6/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sunday, July 13, 2014

July 12, 2014: Sailboat




This is the largest sailboat that I've seen on the lakes.  Out enjoying the overcast and humid conditions.... 7/6/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

July 11, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #69




 Deb Lewis leads a prairie plant interpretive walk. 7/12/12 (Kevin Kane)

Thursday, July 10, 2014. Sunny, slight southerly breeze, 78 degrees F.

Deb Lewis, Curator of the ISU Ada Hayden Herbarium, led an informative interpretive field program of the reconstructed prairie near the Harrison Street Parking Lot. Central Iowa is in the range of the Tallgrass Prairie Region that formerly extended eastward as far as Ohio. Deb explained the key identifying characteristics of the major plant families in the prairie and discussed representative species of these families that were present along the trails.

The daisy or aster family (Asteraceae) is represented by the sunflowers and coneflowers that have complex flowering heads with many ray flowers and disc flowers. The saw-toothed sunflower is just starting to bloom. The species is names after their leaves which have serrated edges, hence the scientific name of the species, grossaserratus. The flowering heads of this species are showing evidence of MLO, also known as microplasm disease. Many of the flowering heads appear stunted with abnormal leaf-like structures growing within the disk flowers. This family includes three species that are in the same genus (Silphium) and all three are growing nearby. These are the compass plant, cup-plant, and rosinweed. The compass plant gets its name from the tendency of its flat, deeply lobed leaves to orient themselves on a North-South axis. It is said that the Early Settlers used it to guide their way. Even though these three species all have yellow-ray flowers with a central disk, they are still easily identifiable - particularly by their leaves, which are all distinct.
Nearby were several plants known as rattlesnake master. This species is in the carrot family (Apiaceae) which is well represented in prairies. The leaves and stems are relatively stiff and the edges of the leaves sharply lobed with spine-like edges that resemble the familiar yucca plant. Hence, the species name yuccafolium.

The tick trefoil is a common member of the bean or legume family (Fabaceae). The tick trefoil is common in the Hayden Park prairies but is just beginning to bloom. It has a pink flower and produces a small sticky seed known as beggar’s lice or beggar’s ticks that will attach themselves to clothing or hair. This adaptation allows the seed to be spread far and wide.

Here is the list of the plants that Deb identified and commented on during our brief walk. Sawtooth sunflower, compass plant, cup plant, rosinweed, rattlesnake master, tick trefoil, Canada goldenrod, mountain mint, purple prairie clover, dogbane, culver’s root, beebalm, yellow sweet clover, bird’s foot trefoil, hoary vervain, black-eyed susan, curled dock, smooth dock, side-oats grama, crown vetch, white sweet clover, gray-headed coneflower, butterfly milkweed, prairie dropseed, Illinois bundleflower, blue grama, cinquefoil, prairie sage, false sunflower (oxeye), horse nettle, common ragweed, giant ragweed, switch grass, yarrow, and elderberry.

Most of the grasses have not started blooming yet but in late summer and fall big bluestem, Indian grass, little bluestem and switch grass will become dominant.
The next program will be Thursday, July 17 at 6:00 pm and will be about damselflies and dragonflies. Meet at the shelter on the north side.

Erv Klaas

Thursday, July 10, 2014

July 10, 2014: Chickweed Geometer



While walking along the trails at the Park one invariably will flush up small moths.  Most are quite nondescript, but this Chickweed Geometer has a splash of color.  It is a member of the Geometridae family and is found throughout the U.S.  The wingspan is only 20-25mm (less than 1 inch).  Adults are on the wing from May to October. 6/24/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

July 9, 2014: Colorful Bridge



Bridge at sunset from the water on the north lake. 7/4/14 (Kevin Kane)

Wednesday, July 9, 2014

July 8, 2014: Killdeer



Killdeer. 7/4/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Just before exiting the Park (7/4) I found a single Killdeer youngster along the Harrison Rd spur.  An adult accompanied it and tried to deter me from snapping a photograph.  The female normally lays 4 eggs in a scrape on the ground.  I wondered where the siblings were, or was this chick the only one to survive to this stage?

Wolf. Oesterreich

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

July 7, 2014: Pelicans




Some unexpected visitors to the south lake on Monday morning had park users stopping for a look. 7/7/14 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, July 7, 2014

July 6, 2014: Erv's Field Notes #68




This female Eastern Pondhawk was found in the north grassy area at Jensen Pond.  The male is blue.
Total Length = 38-44mm; Hindwing Length = 30-33mm; Flight Season = May - Oct. 6/8/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)





Erv's Field Notes #6

Sunday, July 6, 2014. Calm, Cloudy, Temperature 80 degrees F.

My friend Rick Dietz offered to give me a ride in his canoe around the perimeter of the lake on Saturday morning but it rained, so we did it this morning. The water level in the lake is high due to recent rains and the flooded Skunk River. The city shut the outlet gate to prevent the Skunk River from back flowing into the lake. A week ago there was several inches of water over the fishing dock. But the gate has been open, and today the fishing dock is dry. Water still covers the riprap along the shoreline.

The three pairs of Canada Geese that successfully hatched young this year were all together on the west end of the north lake. The young are nearly full grown. One pair had four young and the other two pairs each had two young. Later on the south lake we saw a family of Mallard ducks swimming in the flooded vegetation along shore. I was unable to get a count.

The water in the lake is relatively clear but a significant amount of filamentous algae is beginning to develop in the south lake. It has not yet formed a solid mat but is made up of softball-sized floating clumps. This is a sure sign that phosphorus is increasing in the lake.
We say many large patches of Sago Pondweed growing just off shore in both the north and south lake. This submergent vegetation can grow in clear water up to 10 feet in depth. It is a perennial that produces tubers in the sediment and long stems leading to floating oval-shaped leaves at the surface. A few patches were beginning to develop flowering stems which protrude several inches above the water. These fruiting bodies are favorite perching places for damselflies. The tubers in the sediment store carbohydrates and are preferred food for diving birds such as the Canvasback duck.

We saw swirls and waves created by large fish swimming near the canoe but could not identify them. They could have been carp, large-mouthed bass or striped bass. As we passed the outlet on the south lake we could hear water rushing through the spillway.

Erv Klaas

Sunday, July 6, 2014

July 5, 2014: Wolf's June 2014 Wildlife Report

This drake Ruddy Duck (in non-breeding plumage) was found only on one day this month. 6/26/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 75 avian species was recorded this month, ranking this month as the 6th highest June among 17 years of records.


Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the Common Merganser sightings may be the first Summer records for Story County.  The American Wigeon and Common Loon may represent the 4th Summer record for the County.  The female Blackpoll Warbler may have set a new late Spring record (former set on 1 June 1983 at Ames) for Story County.

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 53rd Supplement (2012) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 12th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-27, 29
     WOOD DUCK: 1 (2♂ + 1♀), 2 (2♀), 3 (1♀), 5 (1♀), 7 (1♀), 9 (1), 10 (1♀), 11 (1), 13 (1♀), 15 (1♀),
                                    20 (1♂ + 2♀), 21 (1♀), 23, 27 (3♀)
     AMERICAN WIGEON: 14 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-26, 27, 29
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1 (2), 2 (1♂), 4 (3♂), 10 (1♂), 11 (1♂ + 1♀), 12 (3♂), 14 (3♂), 15-16 (1♂)
     HOODED MERGANSER: 14 (1♀), 16 (1♀)
     COMMON MERGANSER: 2-5 (1♂), 8 (1♂)
     RUDDY DUCK: 26 (1♂ anb)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1-27, 29-30
     COMMON LOON: 17 (1 abp)
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 29 (1)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1-2 (4), 3 (3), 4-5 (6), 6-7 (3), 8 (9), 9 (4), 10 (5), 11 (4), 12 (9), 13 (5), 14 (7),
                                    15 (3), 16 (5), 17 (3), 18-19 (4), 20 (5), 21 (7), 22 (4), 23 (7), 24-25 (5), 26-27 (3),
                                    29-30 (1)
     GREEN HERON: 2-3 (1), 6 (1), 23 (1)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (6), 2 (7), 3 (1), 4 (3), 5 (1), 6 (2), 7 (16), 8 (1), 9 (4), 10 (2), 11 (1), 13-14 (1),
                                    16 (2), 20 (4), 22-23 (1), 24 (5), 25 (8), 26 (1), 29 (1)
     OSPREY: 19 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 3-4 (1 ad), 8 (1 ad), 16-18 (1 ad), 21 (1 ad)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 10 (1), 22 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (2), 2-4 (1), 5-6 (2), 7, 8-11 (2), 12-13 (1), 14-16, 17 (2), 18, 19 (2), 20-21 (1),
                                    22, 23 (2), 24, 26, 27 (2), 29 (1)
     KILLDEER: 1-3 (2), 4 (1), 5 (2), 6 (3), 9-10 (1), 12 (1), 14 (3), 15-17 (1), 20-22 (1), 24 (1), 25-26 (2),
                                    27 (1), 29 (1)
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 3 (2)
     CASPIAN TERN: 26 (3)
     BLACK TERN: 3 (21)
     ROCK PIGEON: 14 (2)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-30
     GREAT HORNED OWL: 3 (1), 26 (1)
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 7, 13, 21
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 12 (1♀), 20 (1♀)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 3 (1), 10 (1), 19 (1)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 1, 21
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1-3, 7-8, 13, 17, 20-21, 23-24, 30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 24
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 2-3 (1), 8 (1), 13-14 (1), 17 (1), 20 (1), 22-23 (1), 26-27 (1)
     OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 3 (1)
     EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 2 (1), 4 (1), 9 (1)
     WILLOW FLYCATCHER: 15 (1), 26 (1)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 17 (1), 22-23 (1)
     GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 3 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 1 (6), 2 (1), 3-4 (3), 5 (2), 6-9 (1), 10 (2), 11-13 (1), 15-16 (2), 18 (2), 20 (2),
                                    22 (3), 23-25 (1), 26 (3), 27 (1)
     BELL’S VIREO: 9 (1)
     WARBLING VIREO: 1-27, 29
     RED-EYED VIREO: 6-7
     BLUE JAY: 1-3, 7-8, 15, 17, 20-24, 29-30
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-5, 7-15, 18-27, 29-30
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-27, 29
     TREE SWALLOW: 1-27, 29-30
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 6 (1), 12 (1), 17 (2)
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-27, 29
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-2, 4, 6, 8-9, 11-15, 17-23, 25-27
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 3-4, 19, 21
     HOUSE WREN: 1-30
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 2 (1♂), 4 (1♂ + 1♀), 7 (1♂), 11 (1♂), 15 (1♀), 19 (1), 21 (2), 22 (1), 24 (1♀),
                                    25 (1♂), 27 (1♀)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-30
     GRAY CATBIRD: 1-9, 11-13, 15-16, 18-30
     BROWN THRASHER: 1-2 (2), 3 (1), 4-5 (2), 7 (1), 8 (3), 10-11 (2), 12-13 (1), 15 (2), 17 (1), 19 (5), 20,
                                    21 (1), 23 (1), 26 (1), 29 (2), 30 (3)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-27, 29-30
     CEDAR WAXWING: 9 (3), 10 (1), 13 (2), 19 (1), 29 (2)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-27, 29-30
     YELLOW WARBLER: 1 (1), 3 (2), 4 (1)
     BLACKPOLL WARBLER: 2 (1♀)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-7, 9-13, 16-20, 22-26, 28, 30
     FIELD SPARROW: 2 (1), 18 (1)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-27, 29-30
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-30
     INDIGO BUNTING: 1, 3, 5-9, 11-12, 15-25, 27
     DICKCISSEL: 1-27, 29-30
     BOBOLINK: 4 (2♂), 13 (1♂)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-27, 29-30
     EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 1-6, 8-11, 16, 18, 27 (2)
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-27, 29-30
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1-16, 18-27, 29-30
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 2 (2♂), 4 (1♂), 6 (1♂), 13 (1♂), 19 (2♂), 23 (1♂), 27 (1♂)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 1-27, 29
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-30
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-10, 12-27, 29-30
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-30
    
MAMMALIAN
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 4 (1), 5 (1 + 1 BY), 6-7 (1), 9 (2), 10 (1), 15-16 (1 fawn), 18 (1), 21 (1),
                                    23 (1♀ w/2 fawns), 24 (1)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 3, 9, 12, 15, 19, 22, 25
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 3, 6, 9, 13, 15, 17-19, 21-24, 26-27, 29
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 2, 11, 17, 20, 24
     MEADOW VOLE: 20 (1)
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-30

REPTILIAN
     PLAINS GARTER SNAKE: 29 (1)
     GARTER SNAKE sp: 12 (1), 20 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-5, 7, 9-21, 23-25, 27, 29
     EASTERN SPINY SOFTSHELL: 18 (1♀), 24, 26

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 4, 13, 17-18, 20, 25
     BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 2-13, 15-20, 22-25
     EASTERN GRAY TREE FROG: 4-5, 7-8, 10-11, 14, 17, 22, 26
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 6 (1), 7, 22-24, 26
     BULLFROG: 2-3, 5-6, 8-11, 13, 15, 20, 22-23, 25, 27, 29

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 4 (1), 16-17 (1), 19 (1)
     EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 3 (1), 4 (2), 8, 9 (3), 11 (2), 13 (2), 14 (3), 15 (1), 17 (1), 18-19 (3),
                                    20-21, 24-25
     CABBAGE WHITE: 2, 4-5, 8-9, 12-19, 21-27
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 13, 16, 18-21, 23-27, 29
     LITTLE YELLOW: 19
     Sulphur sp.: 1, 8, 12-13, 15-18, 23-27
     GRAY COPPER: 19-21, 23-27
     EASTERN TAILED-BLUE: 9, 11, 16, 18-23
     SPRING AZURE: 1-4, 6, 8-18, 20
     QUESTION MARK: 5 (1)
     EASTERN COMMA: 21
     GORGONE CHECKERSPOT: 23 (caterpillar)
     PEARL CRESCENT: 15, 21, 23-26
     MOURNING CLOAK: 2 (1), 6 (2), 15 (1), 20 (1), 25 (2)
     PAINTED LADY: 29 (1)
     RED ADMIRAL: 9, 17 (2), 20, 22-24, 26
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 3 (1), 18 (1), 20
     RED-SPOTTED PURPLE: 20 (1), 22 (1), 23
     VICEROY: 5 (1), 10 (1), 14 (1), 15 (2), 17 (2), 18-21, 26-27
     MONARCH: 1 (1), 2 (2), 3 (1), 4 (2), 5 (1), 6 (3), 8 (1), 9 (2), 10 (3), 11 (1), 12 (3), 14 (2), 15 (1),
                                    16 (2), 17 (1), 18 (3), 19 (2), 20-21, 23-26
     LEAST SKIPPER: 21, 23, 25

ODONATA
     SLENDER SPREADWING: 26 (1)
     BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 21, 23, 25-26
     POWDERED DANCER: 25 (1)
     RAINBOW BLUET: 20-21, 23-26
     AZURE BLUET: 20 (1♀), 24 (1)
     DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 15, 17-18, 20-21, 23-24, 26
     TULE BLUET: 17, 20-21, 24-25
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 12, 17, 24
     STREAM BLUET: 20, 23
     SKIMMING BLUET: 1 (1), 8-9, 13, 25-26
     ORANGE BLUET: 2 (1), 4, 8, 17, 23
     Bluet sp.: 18, 21, 25
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1-4, 8-11, 13, 15-18, 20-21, 23-26, 29
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1-6, 8-21, 23-26
     PLAINS CLUBTAIL: 17 (2), 19 (1)
     COMMON BASKETTAIL: 2-4, 8-9, 11-13, 15-21, 24-25
     PRINCE BASKETTAIL: 18-21, 23-24, 26
     HALLOWEEN PENNANT: 26 (1)
     EASTERN PONDHAWK: 8, 16, 20-21, 23, 25
     DOT-TAILED WHITEFACE: 1-3, 9
     WIDOW SKIMMER: 3-4 (1♀), 8, 13, 15-16, 18, 20-21, 23-27
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 6, 8-13, 16-25
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 1, 5 (3), 6, 8-9, 11, 15-17, 19-21, 23-26
     BLUE DASHER: 10 (1♀), 18, 20-21, 23-24, 26
     WANDERING GLIDER: 25 (1)
     EASTERN AMBERWING: 18-21, 23-25
     WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 24 (1♀)
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 1-21, 23-26
     RED SADDLEBAGS: 1, 6, 15-21, 23-27

Wolf. Oesterreich

Saturday, July 5, 2014

Friday, July 4, 2014

July 3, 2014: Water Receding



Water begins to recede on a beautiful sunny day. 7/3/14 (Kevin Kane)
Ames water plant officials were at the park Thursday morning to reopen the outflow gates, starting to lower the lake water levels.  There were still several places with water on the trails, one as deep as 8 inches.

Thursday, July 3, 2014

July 2, 2014: Flooding, part 2





Recent rains, plus the spillway gate closure (due to the backup of the Skunk River), have raised the lake water level to a new high for the year. The deck of the fishing pier and part of the trail are now (Wednesday evening) underwater. Two other areas along the trail are also flooded. 7/2/14 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

July 1, 2014: Flooding



Water still rising in the park this morning (Tuesday). Skunk out of it's banks across Hwy 69 but not yet to the road. 7/1/14 (Kevin Kane)

Tuesday, July 1, 2014

June 30, 2014: June 2014 Photo Collage



June 2014 photos from the blog by Kevin Kane, Wolf. Oesterreich, Anamarie Oesterreich, Tyler Harms, and Dave Brotherson.