Sunday, June 30, 2013

June 29, 2013: Eastern Kingbird


Eastern Kingbirds nest at the Park, usually along the Upland Trail.  This adult was found at Jensen Pond. 6/24/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday, June 28, 2013

June 28, 2013: Erv's Hayden Park News #5


Canoe tug-o'-war at Pack the Park, 6/23/13 (Kevin Kane)

Hayden Park News 5

The Pack the Park event last week raised $240 for the Friends of AHHP. Thanks to Jax Outdoors and all of the other sponsors and workers who helped make this even a success.

Also, a big thank you to the Musk Thistle Corps. Al and Ida Johnson worked several hours a day for a week. Others who helped on multiple days were Fritz and Susan Franzen, Wolf Oesterreich, and Jon Hunstock. I hope I didn't miss anyone, if so, please let me know. The large patch of thistles has been pretty well eliminated along the north shore of the west bay of the south lake. But, guess what? There are still thistles out there. Jon Hunstock worked and hour and a half this morning around the inuksut sculpture and he says there is still a large patch just to the south of the inuksut.

If you are able, please come to the park on Saturday morning and meet in the main parking lot at the shelter on the north side. As usual, wear long sleeve shirts and long pants, heavy gloves and hard soled shoes. Bring a sharp trenching shovel. I will bring plastic bags and a couple of buckets to collect flowering heads.

Erv Klaas

Thursday, June 27, 2013

June 27, 2013: Western Fox Snake


This Western Fox Snake was found on the 17th, about two-thirds of the way west from the Upland Trail's south trailhead and the first trail junction. 6/17/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

 This snake represents my first record of this species for the Park (actually the first one I have seen in Iowa).  Fox Snakes vary in length from 36 to 56 inches.  They are very active during the day, especially in the Spring months.  When encountered they are usually very passive, opting to flee when cornered. 

June 26, 2013: Blue Grosbeak


Blue Grosbeak.  6/23/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Blue Grosbeaks are more commonly found in western Iowa.  This male represents the 5th record (in 16 years) for the Park and the 6th for Story County and has been present since Saturday, June 22nd. On Monday, the male was joined by a female.  Unfortunately, neither was observed on Tuesday.

He has been consistently found in the woods west of the bridge spur and main lakes trail (west side) and in the vegetation (where this photo was taken) along the small cove (SW corner of the north lake).  Blue Grosbeaks are slightly larger than Indigo Buntings, plus it has a heavier bill, blacker face, and chestnut wing bars.

Tuesday, June 25, 2013

June 25, 2013: Another Perfect Sunset


Another perfect sunset at Ada Hayden from Tuesday night. On path at southwest corner of north lake. 6/18/13 (Gregg Hadish)

June 24, 2013: Great Egrets


Six Great Egrets (3 shown) and 1 Double-crested  Cormorant were perched in a snag, located between Pool F and Pond P today.  Up to 10 Great Egrets have been found since early this month in the north wetland complex. 6/24/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sunday, June 23, 2013

June 23, 2013: Pack the Park!


Marlene and her turtle. 6/23/13 (Kevin Kane)

Marlene Ehresman of the Iowa Wildlife Center shows one of the turtles that made the turtle tent one of the hit attrations at the first annual "Pack the Park" at AHHP Sunday afternoon. Paddling, biking, games, and interpretive hikes highlighted the day where proceeds went to the Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park. 

See many more of the photos from the day here.

Saturday, June 22, 2013

June 22, 2013: Blue Dasher


Blue Dashers are a small skimmer.  Spring individuals are actually larger than those found in Fall.  This male has green eyes, a mostly white face, with a metallic blue (whitish in photo) abdomen.  The dark brown thorax has some thin yellow stripes.  Its flight season is from May through September.  They are commonly found around Jensen Pond. 6/19/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday, June 21, 2013

June 21, 2013: Hayden Park News #3 & #4




Hayden Park News #3

Thanks to the eight people who worked hard last Saturday morning under threatening skies trying to eradicated musk thistle on the northern bank of the west arm of the south lake. We worked for about 1.5 hours before it began to rain. We were only able to cut about a fourth of the plants that are there. This is a very bad infestation.

The procedure we used was to pull off all pink flowering heads and bag them for removal and composting. The headless plant was then chopped off at the ground level or dug out with a shovel and let lay.

If you have a chance to help on this during the next week or so before the flowers begin to go to seed it will help to control this invasive plant. Some of the areas we worked on last year are looking better this year.

Erv Klaas


Hayden Park News #4

Fritz Franzen, who has been helping chop musk thistles, asked me to pass on this information about musk thistles.

“While taking out thistles I noted that on the order of 6-8 "plants" arose from the same root and, in at least one case, I could discern that the root remained from last season. I went on- line and found what seemed to be an authoritative video. There I learned that the plant can grow from old root fragments (they said do not rototill), that the seeds will survive composting, and that the wind-blown seeds remain viable for up to twenty years. The video says that there are two ways to get rid of thistles: 1. cut them back (as we have been doing) repeatedly until the roots lose vitality or, 2. chemical treatment of the root after cutting. What a horrible invasive! This morning Ida (Johnson) told me that she had read that each flower can yield up to 20,000 seeds. It seems to me we Friends will have to continue nipping the plants in the bud and cutting them back to the root for a number of years. Today I was, to the best of my ability, digging out the root systems, but the video implies that unless I got all of the root I might just as well have cut them off at the bottom of the stem. I will be going out again tomorrow and Saturday and it appears to me that we will have most of the flowering plants deflowered and cut back before I leave on Tuesday. All who enjoy the park owe a great deal to Jon Hunstock, Al and Ida Johnson!. Cordially, Fritz”

Al and Ida have been bagging the flowering heads and I have been composting them in my compost bin, contrary to what is recommend by the video that Fritz cited. I think composting will work on the flowers because I have been covering them immediately with dry leaves and old composted leaves. I don’t think these flowers will make seed with this treatment. I use this compost on my own garden, so if I get thistles growing out of it, I should be able to control them. But, what should we do with flowering heads that are starting to make seed? It probably would be good to bag them separately and I’ll find a way to burn them or treat them chemically. I will be out of town Friday through Sunday this week. You can still drop the bags of
flowering heads off in front of my garage and I’ll take care of them when I return.

If anyone can join the thistle corps, you help would be very much appreciated. Wear heavy gloves and cover you bare skin. These thistles are growing in among a dense stand of wild parsnip and the sap from any part of the plant will cause burns on bare skin that can be painful and last a long time. Next, we’ll have to figure out how to manage the parsnips.

I want to add my thanks to the thistle corps. They have been working very hard. Al has a weed hook that seems the best tool I have seen for this purpose. I have ordered one from Amazon.com. Let me know if anyone has ideas to share. By the way, I noticed that there is a stand of thistles in bloom on the hill in the southwest corner of the park where we cut thistles last year. We’ll get them next year.

Erv Klaas

Thursday, June 20, 2013

June 20, 2013: Thanks to the Thistle Squad!


Al and Ida Johnson. 6/20/13 (Erv Klaas)

Al and Ida Johnson have worked several days cutting musk thistle at
Ada Hayden Park.  There is a thick stand of these invasive species on
the north bank of the west arm of the south lake.  The plant with the
yellow flowers is wild parsnip.  This plant can cause you pain. Notice
that both Al and Ida have on long sleeved shirts.  Thistle has prickly
thorns and parnsip can cause severe burns on bare skin that can last
for weeks or months.  Neither of these species are native to the
United States.  They were introduced more than 100 years ago from
Europe and Asia. 6/20/13 (Erv Klaas)

Musk thistle and wild parnsnip. 6/20/13 (Erv Klaas)

June 19, 2013: Dickcissel


This male Dickcissel was found on Sunday (16th) along the Upland Trail, just west of Jensen Pond.  Dickcissels are one of the last species to arrive in Spring.  This year, I recorded the first one on 29 May.  Right now, they are quite vocal along the Upland Trail, SW corner of the Park, and along the north side.  They are usually heard (dick, dick, dickcissel) before being observed.  They do nest at the Park. 6/16/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

June 18, 2013: Wet Feet


Water approaches the bench on north shore of north lake.  The water is finally slowly receding again.  6/8/13 (Kelly Poole)

Monday, June 17, 2013

June 17, 2013: Erv's Field Notes #59


This colorful dragonfly was photographed on the north shore of the north lake on Sunday, June 16,2013. I identified it as a Midland Clubtail, a new species for Hayden Park.  This raises the total species of odonates observed in the park to 51. 6/16/13 (Erv Klaas)

Sunday, June 16, 2013. 1:30-3:00 pm. Bright sunshine, slight breeze from west, 85 degrees F.
The Park was busy today with boaters, walkers, and fishers. Lots of families enjoying the park on Father’s Day.

I walked along the north shore in search of dragonflies. A pair of Black Saddlebags flew by in tandem. I tentatively identified a Common Baskettail patrolling a section of the shoreline. A couple of blue damselflies perched on vegetation turned out to be Double-striped Bluets. As I was slowly moving along the dirt path near the water, a Mallard drake walked out of the tall vegetation a few yards in front of me. He walked into the water and swam away from shore. A few minutes later, he got up and flew back into the tall vegetation.
I continued up the trail and spotted a large yellow and black dragonfly on a rock near the water. I edged slowly toward it and began to photograph it. I immediately noticed the enlarged tip of the tail that indicated that it was a member of a group of uncommon species of dragonflies called clubtails. The bug was very cooperative and let me approach to within a few feet. I took a lot of photos with my telephoto lens in hopes that I could get a picture with definitive identifying marks. Later when I downloaded the photos on to my computer I was able to identify it as a Midland Clubtail, a new species for the park. I continued surveying the shoreline for another half-hour and identified Rainbow Bluets, more Double-Striped Bluets and Eastern Forktails. Several Common Green Darners flew by including a pair in tandem. You can see my photo of the Midland Clubtail on the park blog.

As I returned to the parking lot, the Mallard drake was sitting motionless about 30 yards offshore in the same spot that I saw him before. This behavior indicated that he has a mate nesting in the tall vegetation. His attentiveness indicated also that the hen is probably just in the laying stage. The drake will remain close-by until she begins incubation; a period of 28 days. The drake will then return once or twice a day to check on her but will remain at a distance, perhaps a mile or more, so as not to attract predators. Even so, predation causes the loss of 75 percent or more of duck nests. Re-nesting is common and with ample amounts of good habitat mallard populations can be sustained. The vegetation where I observed this pair is very dense and she should have a good chance of a successful hatch.

Erv Klaas

Saturday, June 15, 2013

June 14, 2013: Environmental Writing Workshop



Call for Participation – Creative Writing
Writing to Wholeness: An Environmental Writing Workshop
with Writers for Life and Montebello Bed & Breakfast/LaCIM
supported by generous funds from the Leopold Center and the Iowa Arts Council

The problem of providing public education in environmental awareness is significant. Imagine the opportunity to address this challenge by participating in a free environmental writing short course that helps bridge the gap in public knowledge regarding local environmental concerns. The Writing to Wholeness workshop is designed to inspire writers to consider the natural world in a new light. Through the use of narrative prompts and thematic sessions, such as importance of place, agricultural sustainability, and interconnectedness of species, writers will reflect upon their connection to the natural world and its impact on their unique life histories. Six weekly 1.5 hour instruction sessions will be followed by editorial assistance. The polished pieces will be compiled into an anthology which will be available free of charge for distribution through Montebello and locations in central Iowa. Participation in a public reading at Montebello and other area events is proposed to foster community involvement.

Tuesdays beginning June 25, 6-7:30pm, for six weeks, at Montebello Bed & Breakfast

To register, please contact Laura and Jason at the email address below.

Laura Sweeney and Jason Arbogast
Writers for Life
2101 Oakwood Road
Apt. 302
Ames, IA 50014
writersforlife@hotmail.com

Friday, June 14, 2013

June 13, 2013: Spiderwort


Spiderwort by Kelly Poole. 6/8/13
 
Dew was covering most everything in the park this morning when I arrived at about 6:30. The spiderwort in bloom above the limestone wall on the upland trail was no exception. Although it seems to be relatively common in Iowa, if you are not a morning person, you may miss it. Spiderwort typically blooms a few hours early in the day with the petals closing as the day progresses (unless it is cloudy/overcast). I'm sure there are exceptions to this but it seems to be a good rule of thumb.
 
Kelly Poole
June 8th, 2013

Wednesday, June 12, 2013

June 12, 2013: Erv's Field Notes #58


So far this season Odonate activity has been relatively quiet.  Black Saddlebags (this photo) were quite common at Pond L and Jensen Pond, plus a few elsewhere.  Several tandem (male abdominal appendages claps female behind the eyes, as a precursor to or after mating and may be maintained during egg laying) pairs were also observed.  Common Green Darners and Twelve-spotted Skimmers were present, but not as numerous.  Fewer still were Eastern Forktails at Jensen Pond (both male and immature females).  Erv Klaas found a teneril (recently emerged) male Double-striped Bluet along the north lake's north shore. 6/11/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, June 11, 2013, 3-5 PM. Sunny, wind from the west. Temperature, high 80s.

I went dragonfly hunting today. Dragonfly activity has been slow this spring due to the cold and wet weather and high water. I saw a few Common Green Darners early in May but the numbers have not been high. This species is known to be migratory so the ones I saw are probably early arrivals from the south. As the water gets warmer local species will begin to emerge. Maybe today is the beginning.

I walked along the north shore this afternoon. The water level is still high and most of the rip rap is still covered. I saw one little brown damselfly in the vegetation near shore. I could not identify it with binoculars so I took several photographs with my 300 mm lens. This was a challenge because the wind was moving the grass quite a bit. When I got home and downloaded the photos I was surprised to see that several of them were in focus. I identified the species as an immature male Double-striped Bluet. It must have just emerged today because the parts of the body that are normally bright blue were a light tan in color. The tan will turn blue within a day or two. The black double stripe on the thorax was unmistakable as the identifying characteristic.

I then walked up the trail to Jensen’s Pond and found lots of odonate activity. I identified Common Green Darners, Black Saddlebags, 12-Spotted Skimmers, and one Blue Dasher. Eastern Forktail damselflies were flitting around in the vegetation near shore. One small fast flyer may have been a Common Baskettail but I didn’t get a good look at it. Darners, Saddlebags and Skimmers were all breeding and laying eggs. As I walked back on the upland trail, I saw a Variegated Meadowhawk, another migratory species. Dragonfly hunting was good today.

Erv Klaas

Tuesday, June 11, 2013

June 11, 2013: Blue Flag Iris


I believe that this is a Blue Flag Iris, found at the south end of Pond J, with a few more along the west side of Pond M.  The flowers resemble the domestic iris, but has segments that are both more slender and smaller.  The flower is composed of 3 petals, 3 sepals, and 3 petal-like branches of the style.  6/8/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, June 10, 2013

June 10, 2013: Sunday 6/23 - Pack the Park

Hey, Central Iowans! Join us at Ada Hayden Park on the afternoon of Sunday, June 23 for peddling, paddling, and perambulating! All proceeds go to benefit the Friends of Ada Hayden Park and our efforts to put interpretive signs along the trails of the park. Lots of fun events for the whole family--please join us! 6/10/13 (Jim Pease)

Sunday, June 9, 2013

June 9, 2013: Early Morning Walk

Reflections of the sunrise in the water and grasses.  6/8/13 (Kelly Poole)

June 8, 2013: Tree Swallow Study


Anyone that has hiked along the Upland Trail will have noticed the Tree Swallow nesting boxes located below the trail in the northwest corner.  Carol and Dave Vleck (ISU) have been conducting a study on this species for several years.  (They have given a presentation to the Friends group in the past.)  One photo shows Carol measuring the wing length of a female.  The other photo shows Carol weighing the same bird, with her sister, Susan Masters, recording the notes.  The Vlecks are retiring and will be passing the "baton" on to someone else to continue the study.  6/8/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Saturday, June 8, 2013

June 7, 2013: Thanks!


Thanks to everyone who came out to the Ames Art Walk last night.  Looks like we raised about $200 for the Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park!  A special thanks to Ruthann Hadish at the Ames Yoga Center for sponsoring and hosting us!

Thursday, June 6, 2013

June 6, 2013: Support Friends of AHHP Friday at the Art Walk!


There are plenty of reasons to get out to the Ames Art Walk tomorrow (Friday, 6/7/13, 5pm, downtown Ames) and supporting Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park is one of the best!  There will be framed prints, metal prints, greeting cards, post cards, and photo books of photographers Kevin Kane, Erv Klaas, and Wolf. Oesterreich on sale with all profits going directly to the Friends of AHHP! Our exhibit is at the Ames Yoga Center, 327 Main Street Suite 3.

Wednesday, June 5, 2013

Tuesday, June 4, 2013

June 4, 2013: Wolf's May 2013 Species List


American Robin. 6/3/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

A total of 149 avian species (+ 2 sp.) was recorded this month.  The Say’s Phoebe was #263 for the Park-Yard List.  The Audubon’s form of the Yellow-rumped Warbler on the 12th was my first for Iowa.

Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the female Canvasback sighted on the 18th may represent a new extreme late Spring record for Story County (former record set on 12 May 2008 at AHHP).  Other potential new extreme late Spring records include the Osprey on the 29th (former record set on 26 May 1986 at Ames), Orange-crowned Warbler on the 27th (former record set on 22 May 2010 at AHHP), and the American Tree Sparrow on the 7th (former record set on 2 April 2009 at AHHP).  The Lincoln Sparrow found on the 27th ties the record set in 1982 in Ames.  The Say’s Phoebe was the first Story County record.  The 150+ Bonaparte’s Gulls may set a new peak record (former record of 19 on 9 May 1988 at Hendrickson Marsh).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 53rd Supplement (2012) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 12th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     SNOW GOOSE: 5 (1 w), 19 (1 w im)
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-31
     WOOD DUCK: 1 (2), 3 (2♂), 5 (2♂), 15 (2♂), 17 (1), 18 (1♂ + 1♀), 19 (1♂), 20 (1♂ + 1♀), 22 (1♂),
                                    24 (1♂ + 1♀), 25 (2♂ + 1♀), 26 (1♂ + 1♀), 27 (2), 28-29 (1♀), 30
     GADWALL: 1 (2♂ + 3♀), 2-4, 5 (1♂), 6, 9 (17), 17-18 (1♂), 24 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-31
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 1-16, 17 (19+), 18 (8+), 19, 21-26, 27 (1♂ + 1♀), 30 (1♂), 31 (2♂)
     NORTHERN SHOVELER: 1-10, 13-15, 16 (2♂), 19, 24 (1♂ + 1♀), 26-27 (1♂)
     GREEN-WINGED TEAL: 1, 8 (3♂)
     CANVASBACK: 18 (1♀)
     REDHEAD: 1 (2♂ + 1♀), 2, 4, 5 (4♂ + 2♀), 6 (2♂ + 1♀), 8 (1♂)
     RING-NECKED DUCK: 1 (5), 2-7, 8 (6), 10 (1♂), 15 (1♂), 18-20 (1♂), 21 (3♂), 22-25 (1♂), 27-31 (1♂)
     LESSER SCAUP: 1 (23), 2-3, 4 (2♂ + 2♀), 5 (27+), 6 (2♂), 7 (3), 8 (1♂), 9 (12), 10 (1♂), 12-13 (1♂),
                                    15 (1♂)
     BUFFLEHEAD: 1-5, 6 (1♂ + 5♀)
     RUDDY DUCK: 1 (12+), 2-4, 5 (33+), 6, 7 (5), 8 (4), 9 (18), 10 (8), 11, 12-14 (2), 15 (2♀), 16-17 (1♀)
     RING-NECKED PHEASANT: 1, 2-3 (1♂ + 1♀, BY), 4-5, 6 (+ 1♂ BY), 7-31
     COMMON LOON: 1 (1), 2-3 (2 abp + 1 anb), 4 (2 anb + 3 abp), 5 (2 abp + 1 anb), 6 (1 abp + 1 anb),
                                    7 (1 anb), 8 (1 abp + 1 anb), 9-12 (1 anb), 20 (1 anb)
     PIED-BILLED GREBE: 1 (68+), 2-4, 5 (30+), 6, 7 (8), 8 (4), 9 (25+), 10 (20+), 11, 12 (3), 13 (4), 14 (2),
                                    15 (6), 16 (4), 17 (2), 18 (1), 19 (4), 25 (2)
     HORNED GREBE: 1 (3), 2 (40+), 3 (40), 4 (17), 5 (25+), 6 (11+), 7-8 (3), 9 (1), 10 (2)
     RED-NECKED GREBE: 2 (1), 10-16 (1), 18 (1)
     EARED GREBE: 1 (2), 2 (1), 3-4 (2), 5 (3), 6-7 (1), 8-12 (2)
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 1 (2), 3 (16), 9-10 (1)
     AMERICAN WHITE PELICAN: 1 (21)
     AMERICAN BITTERN: 14 (1), 24 (1), 29 (1)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (5), 2 (2), 3-5 (5), 6 (3), 7 (6), 8 (5), 9-10 (3), 11, 12 (2), 13 (5), 14 (1),
                                    15 (6), 16-18 (2), 19 (6), 20 (3), 21 (4), 22 (2), 23 (3), 24 (5), 25-27 (2), 28 (4),
                                    29 (2), 30 (1), 31 (3)
     GREAT EGRET: 1 (5), 4 (3), 5-6 (1), 15 (5), 19 (5), 21 (4), 27 (1), 29 (1), 31 (1)
     SNOWY EGRET: 1-2 (1)
     GREEN HERON: 6 (1), 7 (2), 8 (1), 11-13 (1), 17 (1), 26 (1), 28-30 (1)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (3), 3 (4), 4 (2), 5 (8+), 6 (5), 7 (3), 8 (1), 9 (6), 10 (2), 11, 14 (8), 15 (6),
                                    16-17 (4), 18 (2), 19 (4), 20-21 (1), 22 (2), 24 (3), 25 (5), 26 (15+), 28 (2), 29 (3),
                                    30 (6), 31 (3)
     OSPREY: 1 91), 3-4 (1), 5 (2), 7 (1), 11 (1), 14 (1), 20 (1), 22 (1), 29 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 3-5 (1 ad), 9 (1 ad), 11 (1 ad), 17 (1 ad), 21 (1 ad), 25-26 (1 ad), 28 (1 ad)
     NORTHERN HARRIER: 1 (1♀)
     SHARP-SHINNED HAWK: 11 (1)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 1 (1), 5 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 1 (1), 3 (2) 4 (1), 5-6 (2), 7-12 (1), 13 (3), 15-18 (1), 20 (1), 22 (1), 24-25 (2),
                                    26-28 (1), 29 (2), 30 (1), 31 (2)
     VIRGINIA RAIL: 6-7 (1)
     SORA: 5 (2), 6 (3), 7 (2)
     AMERICAN COOT: 1-16, 17 (40+), 18 (25+), 19 (12+), 20-23, 24 (3), 25, 26 (11)
     SANDHILL CRANE: 1 (1)
     KILLDEER: 1-6, 9, 14, 16, 18, 20, 22, 27, 30
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 1 (10), 2 (4), 3 (2), 4 (1), 5 (3), 6 (2), 7 (1), 8 (3), 9 (2), 10 (1), 11, 12 (1),
                                    13 (2), 14 (1), 15 (2), 16 (1), 22-23 (1), 26 (7+), 27 (1), 30 (2)
     SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 2-5 (1), 9-10 (1), 13 (6), 19 (1)
     GREATER YELLOWLEGS: 1-2 (2), 3 (3), 4-5 (1)
     LESSER YELLOWLEGS: 1 (5), 2 (3), 3 (20), 4 (10+), 5 (5+), 16 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 15 (1)
     LEAST SANDPIPER: 12 (1), 14 (1), 15 (7)
     Sandpiper sp.: 1 (~15), 3 (4)
     WILSON’S SNIPE: 1 (1), 2 (3), 3 (2), 4 (1)
     WILSON’S PHALAROPE: 2 (1♂ + 1♀), 3 (1♂), 4 (2♂ + 3♀), 5 (2♂ + 4♀)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 1 (8), 3 (1), 14 (16)
     BONAPARTE’S GULL: 2 (150+), 3 (11)
     BLACK TERN: 9 (1), 11, 14 (8), 20 (8), 22 (9)
     FORSTER’S TERN: 1 (5), 3 (1), 10 (4), 12 (1), 22 (5)
     ROCK PIGEON: 24 (1)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-31
     YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO: 27 (1)
     COMMON NIGHTHAWK: 15 (1), 17-18 (1), 20 (1)
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 5 (1), 10-12, 14, 21, 23
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 23 (1♀), 28-29 (1♀)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 3-6 (1), 8 (1♀), 9 (1♂ + 1♀), 10 (1), 13 (1), 15 (1), 22 (1), 26-27 (2), 30 (1)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 3, 5-7, 10, 14-17, 19, 25-27
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1-11, 13-15, 17-19, 22, 30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 2-4, 6-7, 9, 15, 17, 21, 25, 30
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1-2, 4-6, 9, 10 (1), 13, 14 (1), 19 (1), 22 (1), 27-29 (1)
     PEREGRINE FALCON: 1-2 (1), 9 (1)
     OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 25 (1), 27 (2), 28 (1)
     EASTERN WOOD-PEWEE: 14 (1), 22 (1), 25-26 (1), 28
     YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER: 26 (1)
     WILLOW FLYACTCHER: 26
     LEAST FLYCATCHER: 9 (1), 12 (1), 13 (3), 17 (2), 19 (4), 20 (3), 21, 22 (4), 23 (2), 25 (3), 26-27
     Empidonax sp.: 25-29
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 1 (1), 6 (1), 9 (2), 10 (1), 11, 27 (1)
     SAY’S PHOEBE: 9-10 (1)
     GREAT CRESTED FLYCATCHER: 9 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 10 (1), 14 (1), 15 (6), 16 (3), 17 (5), 19 (3), 20 (1), 21 (2), 23 (1), 24-25,
                                    26 (4+), 27 (2), 28 (3), 29 (2), 31 (1)
     BELL’S VIREO: 27 (1 BY)
     YELLOW-THROATED VIREO: 9 (1)
     BLUE-HEADED VIREO: 9 (2), 10 (1), 19 (1)
     WARBLING VIREO: 1 (1), 8 (5+), 9 (1), 14 (3), 15 (2), 16 (5), 17-19, 21-22, 24-31
     PHILADELPHIA VIREO: 10 (1), 22 (2), 23 (1), 26 (1)
     RED-EYED VIREO: 17, 18 (1), 19-23, 25-29
     BLUE JAY: 2-8, 10, 15-17, 19, 25, 28
     AMERICAN CROW: 1-27, 29-31
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-31
     TREE SWALLOW: 1-31
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLLOW: 1-3, 5-12, 18 (3), 22, 25-26
     BANK SWALLOW: 1-2, 5 (3), 8 (8+), 9-14, 21-22, 25-26
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 5 (2), 11-14, 20, 22, 25-26
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-5, 7-31
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-10, 12-19, 21-27, 29-31
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 3, 5, 9, 12-13, 15-18
     HOUSE WREN: 4-31
     SEDGE WREN: 10 (2), 29 (1), 31
     MARSH WREN: 1 (1), 7-8 (1)
     BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER: 8 (2)
     RUBY-CROWNED KINGLET: 1 (4), 2 (2), 3 (1), 5 (3), 6 (2), 9 (2), 10 (3), 11, 12 (3), 13 (1), 14 (2),
                                    21 (1)
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 1 (1♂ + 1♀), 2-4 (1♂), 5, 8-9, 10 (1♂ + 1♀), 11, 13 (1♂), 14 (2♂ + 1♀),
                                    15 (1♂), 16 (1♀), 17, 18 (1♂ + 1♀), 20 (1♂ + 1♀), 21 (1♂), 23 (1♂), 24 (2♂),
                                    28-29 (1♂), 31 (1♂ + 1♀)
     GRAY-CHEEKED THRUSH: 9 (1), 12 (2), 15 (1)
     SWAINSON’S THRUSH: 3 (1), 8 (1), 9 (3), 10 (2), 11, 12 (2), 13 (1), 19 (1), 25 (2), 27 (1)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 7-8 (1), 9 (2), 10-31
     BROWN THRASHER: 1 (1 BY), 2 (2 BY + 1), 3 ( 1 BY + 2), 4 (2 BY + 2), 5 (1 BY + 8), 6 (2 BY + 2),
                                    7 (2 BY + 3), 8 (1 BY + 1), 9 (2), 10, 12-14 (1), 15 (1 BY + 1), 16-17 (1),
                                    18-20 (2), 24 (1 BY), 26 (1 BY + 1), 27 (1), 29-30 (1)
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 1-31
     AMERICAN PIPIT: 2 (2)
     CEDAR WAXWING: 27 (1 + 1 BY)
     OVENBIRD: 9 (2), 10 (1), 11, 12 (1), 19 (1), 27 (1)
     LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH: 12 (1), 15-16 (1)
     NORTHERN WATERTHRUSH: 10 (1), 13 (1), 16-17 (1)
     BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 9-10 (1), 12 (1), 14 (1), 19 (1)
     TENNESSEE WARBLER: 6 (1), 19-20, 23, 26, 27 (2)
     ORANGE-CROWNED WARBLER: 1-2 (1), 3 (2), 14 (2), 15-17 (1), 19 (1), 21 (1), 23 (1), 27 (1)
     NASHVILLE WARBLER: 8-9 (1♂), 10 (1), 12 (2), 13 (1), 21 (1)
     MOURNING WARBLER: 19 (1), 27 (1)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-2 (2♂), 9-10 (1♂), 12 (1♂ + 1♀), 13 (2♂ + 1♀), 15 (6♂), 16 (2♂),
                                    17-31
     AMERICAN REDSTART: 9 (2♂), 10 (1♂), 13 (3♂ + 2♀), 14 (1♂), 15 (3♂), 17 (1♂ + 1♀),
                                    19 (1♂ + 4♀), 20 (1♂), 21 (1♂ + 3♀), 22 (1♂ + 2♀), 23-25 (2♀), 26 (1♀),
                                    27 (2♂ + 6♀), 28 (1♀), 29, 30 (1♀), 31
     MAGNOLIA WARBLER: 14 (1), 19-22 (1), 25 (1), 27 (3)
     BLACKBURNIAN WARBLER: 8 (1♂), 26 (1♂)
     YELLOW WARBLER: 1 (5♂), 3 (1♂), 6 (1♂), 8 (1♂), 9 (3♂ + 1♀), 10 (4♂), 11, 12 (2), 13 (4♂),
                                    15 (5+♂ + 1♀), 16 (4♂), 17 (♂♀), 18-19, 21-23, 25, 26 (7+), 27 (3+), 28, 30
     CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER: 18-19 (1), 21 (1), 25 (1), 27 (1 BY)
     BLACKPOLL WARBLER: 9 (1), 11, 14 (1♂), 19 (1♀), 26 (1♂)
     PALM WARBLER: 1 (8), 2, 3 (4), 4 (1), 5 (4), 9-10 (2), 11, 12 (9), 13 (5), 14 (2)
     YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Myrtle): 1-2 (5), 3 (17+), 4, 5 (14+), 6 (25+), 7 (12+), 8 (8+), 9 (25+),
                                    10 (10+), 11, 12 (3), 13-14 (5), 15 (3), 17 (1), 25 (1)
     YELLOW-RUMPED WARBLER (Audubon’s): 12 (1)
     CANADA WARBLER: 19 (2), 25 (1), 27 (1)
     WILSON’S WARBLER: 14 (3♂), 15 (1♂), 19 (4♂), 21 (1♂), 22-23 (2♂), 25 (2♂ + 1♀), 26 (3♂ + 1♀),
                                    27 (11 + 1 BY), 28 (2♂)
     EASTERN TOWHEE: 9 (1♂)
     AMERICAN TREE SPARROW: 2-3 (1 BY), 5 (1 BY), 7 (1 BY)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 1-10, 12-31
     CLAY-COLORED SPARROW: 1 (1), 2 (2), 3 (4+), 4, 5 (1 BY + 4), 6 (4), 8-9 (2), 10 (6), 13 (5),
                                    14 (8+), 15 (24+)
     FIELD SPARROW: 1-3 (1)
     VESPER SPARROW: 1 (1), 2-3 (8+), 4-5
     LARK SPARROW: 1 (2), 2 (3), 3 (1)
     SAVANNAH SPARROW: 1 (1), 2 (6), 3 (10+), 4, 5 (4), 8 (1), 12, 13-14 (1), 15 (2), 17 (1)
     LE CONTE’S SPARROW: 1 (1), 3 (1), 5 (1)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-31
     LINCOLN’S SPARROW: 1 (2 BY), 2 (3 BY + 1), 3 (2 BY + 4), 4 (2 BY), 5 (5 BY), 6 (4 BY + 1),
                                    7 (2 BY), 8-9 (1 BY + 3), 10 (2 BY + 7), 11, 12 (2 BY), 13 (1 BY + 1), 14 (3),
                                    15-16 (2), 20 (1), 22-24 (1), 27 (1)
     SWAMP SPARROW: 1 (2), 2 (1), 3 (6+), 5 (1), 6 (3 + 1 BY), 9 (1), 12 (1)
     WHITE-THROATED SPARROW: 1 (4 BY), 2 (4 BY +), 3-10, 12-13, 14 (2), 15 (4+)
     HARRIS’S SPARROW: 1-2 (4 BY), 3 (2 BY), 4 (2 BY + 1), 5 (3 BY), 6 (4 BY), 7 (1 BY), 8 (2 BY),
                                    9 (1 BY + 1), 10 (2 BY + 1), 12 (2 BY), 13 (3 BY), 14 (9+), 15 (1 BY + 11+)
     WHITE-CROWNED SPARROW: 1 (5 BY + 1), 2 (10 BY +), 3-10, 12-13, 15
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-10, 12-31
     ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 7 (1♂ + 2♂ / 1♀ BY), 9-10 (1♂), 15 (1♂), 17 (1♂ + 1♀), 19 (1♀)
     INDIGO BUNTING: 13 (1♂), 19 (2♀), 26 (1♀), 30 (1♂)
     DICKCISSEL: 29 (1), 31
     BOBOLINK: 14-15 (1♂), 17 (1♂)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-31
     EASTERN MEADOWLARK: 1, 3-10, 13, 15, 17-20, 22-31
     COMMON GRACKLE: 1-31
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 1-10, 12-31
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 20 (1♂), 26 (1♀), 27 (1♂ + 2♀), 29 (2♂ + 1♀)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 1 (1♂ BY), 3-4 (1♂), 5 (2♂), 6 (3♂), 7 (4♂), 8-31
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-10, 12-31
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1, 3-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-9, 12-31

MAMMALIAN
     STRIPED SKUNK: 31 (1)
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 1 (5), 3-5 (4), 7 (1), 10 (8), 15 (1), 17 (6, 2 with budding antlers), 18 (2),
                                    22-23 (1), 26 (1), 28 (1), 29-30 (2)
     WOODCHUCK: 18 (1)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 1-6, 8-9, 12-13, 15-19, 23, 25, 27-28
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 6-8. 10, 15, 17, 24, 28
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 10, 27, 31
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-10, 12-13, 15-31

REPTILIAN
     EASTERN GARTER SNAKE: 10 (1), 27 (1)
     COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE: 28 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 6-7, 10, 12, 15-17, 19-20, 23-24, 28, 30-31

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 1, 6-10, 15-17, 20-21, 23-29
     BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 19-25, 27-30
     EASTERN GRAY TREEFROG: 6, 9
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 1, 6-10, 13, 15-17, 19-20
     BULLFROG: 7, 13, 28
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 7-8. 16

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 12, 14-15, 19
     CABBAGE WHITE: 6-7, 10, 12,15-18
     Sulphur sp.: 12, 15, 17-18, 23, 28, 30-31
     PEARL CRESCENT: 18 (1), 28
     MOURNING CLOAK: 6 (2), 7 (1), 16-17 (1), 28 (1), 30, 31 (7)
     MONARCH: 28 (5+), 30, 31 (5)

ODONATE
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 6-7, 13, 15-18, 24, 28, 31
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 30 (1♀)
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 15, 31
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 31 (1)
Wolf. Oesterreich

Monday, June 3, 2013

June 3, 2012: Amazing Sunset




"Sunset tonight in flyover country (Ada Hayden Park, Ames IA)." 6/3/13 (Michael David Martin)

Sunday, June 2, 2013

June 2, 2013: Mourning Cloak


Morning Cloaks. 5/31/13 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

On the 31st, over 7 Mourning Cloaks were observed throughout the Park. Overwintered adults mate in the Spring, with the males perching in sunny openings (ie. west spur at the bluff area) during the afternoon to wait for receptive females. Eggs are laid in groups of the host plant (ie. willows, American Elm, Aspen, Hackberry). Caterpillars live in a communal web and feed together on young leaves. After pupating they emerge as adults in June or July.

Saturday, June 1, 2013

June 1, 2013: Friends of AHHP at Ames ArtWalk on Friday 6/7


One of the silent auction framed prints available at the Artwalk on Friday 6/7, a twelve-spotted skimmer taken by Erv Klaas.

ArtWalk, Downtown Ames, Friday June 7th, 5-8pm

Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park will be part of the 2013 Downtown Ames ArtWalk! Ruthann O'Brien Hadish at the Ames Yoga Center (https://www.facebook.com/AmesYoga & http://www.amesyoga.com/) will be sponsoring the AHHP photography of Kevin Kane, Erv Klaas, and Wolf. Oesterreich. There will be framed prints, photo books, greeting cards, and post cards of AHHP life on display, for silent auction, and for sale. All proceeds will go to the Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park for more park improvements and educational events. Watch this space for more details and a sneak peek of the items that will be exhibited.

Description:
Come experience a night dedicated to the arts!

ArtWalk includes music, food and fun!

Coordinated with The Octagon Center for the Arts, downtown businesses and organizations will host local artists and their work.

Various talents will perform on state in Tom Evans Plaza.

Location:
Main Street Cultural District, Downtown Ames

Date(s):
Friday, June 7, 2013

Time(s):
5 p.m.

Contact Information:
For more information, visit www.amesdowntown.org.