Wednesday, September 30, 2015

Tuesday, September 29, 2015

Sept 27, 2015: Blood Moon


The full moon, lunar eclipse, blood moon brought out a huge crowd to the park Sunday night.  There was a steady stream of cars into and then out of the park where everyone was congregating to see a remarkable sight.  Ada Hayden Park is truly a place that brings people together. 9/27/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 26, 2015: Geese Returning


There are more and more geese flying into the lake in the last few weeks.  These were flying west into salmon sunset clouds. 8/26/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 25, 2015: Autumn on the Wetland


A SE to S view across the north wetland complex, from the NW corner of the Upland Trail. 9/25/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sept 24, 2015: Bare Trees


Bare trees frame the sunset, looking west from the central wetlands. 8/26/15 (Kevin Kane)

Monday, September 28, 2015

Sept 23, 2015: Contemplating Kayakers


Kayaking on the south lake. 8/26/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 22, 2015: Rainbow

A rainbow was present during the brief shower on the evening of the 22nd. (looking NE into the Park) 9/22/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sunday, September 27, 2015

Sep 21, 2015: 3 years ago today: Sunflower After Dark


Sunflower in the north prairie lit by a flash after sunset, 9/18/12 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 20, 2015: Upland Trail


An eastward view along the north slope, as viewed from the NW corner of the Upland Trail. 9/20/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Wednesday, September 23, 2015

Sept 19, 2015: Great Blue Heron


The silhouettes of 2 of 5 Great Blue Herons found perched in trees between Pool F and Pond P. 9/18/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sept 18, 2015: Sunset after the Storm


The sun has already dropped below the horizon, illuminating the edge of tonight's storm, as we look across the south lake. 9/18/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Tuesday, September 22, 2015

Sunday, September 20, 2015

Sept 16, 2015: Inuksuk


The rising sun shines through the Inuksuk. 9/13/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sept 15, 2015: Another Tale of Two Lakes


A late summer storm moves in over the lakes, looking west across the bridge. 9/6/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 14, 2014: Morning Mist


A morning mist coming off of the south lake.  (looking eastward). 9/13/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, September 14, 2015

Sept 13, 2015: 9th annual Great Ames Adventure Race (GAAR)


GAAR kayak-canoe leg - rounding the south lake
The 9th annual Great Ames Adventure Race (GAAR) happened Sunday morning (9/13).  The race consists of three legs: 2.7 miles around the main lakes at Ada Hayden by kayak or canoe, 15 miles by bike (from the Park to around the Gilbert area and back), and a 5K run along the Park trails.  Last year there were 125 participants.  Based on the number of bikers (70) that passed my corner (volunteered as a corner marshal), I would venture to guess that the total number is less this year. 9/14/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)




biking leg - along US-69


running leg - coming down the Upland Trail

Sept 12, 2015: Painted Sunset Reflections


Sunset over the north lake. 9/12/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 11, 2015: Whorled Milkweed


Whorled Milkweed (Asclepias verticillata), a member of the Milkweed Family (Ascplepiadacea) grows to 2 to 2.5 feet tall and can be found on mesic to dry prairies.  This species is rather rare at the Park and, so far, has only be found on the north slope, just east of Jensen Pond.  I found 3 stands, each containing over 100 plants (one stand shown at right).  Since they are rare for the Park, Erv suggested that I delineate then to protect them from being mowed down during the haying operation that had started on the two eastern-most slopes.  Using fluorescent pink flagging tape I delineated two of the stands, the ones closest to the sumac patch by the swing.  Unfortunately, on the following day, the farmer or one of his workers ignored the flagging and hayed them down.  Only a few plants along the edges escaped. We had hoped to collect seed this Fall, so that we could establish more stands. 8/9/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sept 10, 2015: Aquatic Ecology Talk

Dr. Stewart gives an introduction to the Park's aquatic system.

Dr. Timothy Stewart (ISU Dept of Natural Resource Ecology & Management) gave a presentation (9/10) on aquatic ecology as part of the Friends of Ada Hayden Heritage Park Thursday evening interpretive programs.  Sixteen ISU students were also in attendence and they helped Dr. Stewart collect samples. 9/10/15 (Wolf Oesterreich)










Removing a Northern Painted Turtle from a Fyke net that had been set up in Pond J.


 






Emptying the Fyke net.

 












   

Discussing how to sex a crayfish.




Sept 9, 2015: Turtle Trail


Even the carapaces of these Northern Painted Turtles are covered by algae and duck weed at Jensen Pond. 9/9/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sunday, September 13, 2015

Sept 8, 2015: Common Green Darner


Finding a Common Green Darner that isn't in flight is not a common occurrence.  This male was found along the lower Upland Trail. 8/10/15 Wolf. Oesterreich
Total Length = 68-78mm
Hindwing Length = 46-53mm
Flight Season = Apr-Oct

Tuesday, September 8, 2015

Sept 7, 2015: Back Flow

 
Due to the heavy rains just north of Ames last Friday (8/29), the Skunk River was flowing high, causing a backflow into the south lake at Ada Hayden Heritage Park.  There was an attempt to close the spillway gate, but due to some blockage, the last 6 inches remained open. 8/29/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Monday, September 7, 2015

Sept 6, 2015: Calm Before the Storm


The orange glow of the sunset off clouds to the north peeks through a hole in the line of storms approaching the park. Looking north from the south shore of the north lake. 9/6/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sunday, September 6, 2015

Sept 5, 2015: Lightning Strike

This tree was apparently struck by lightning very recently (8/18).  The tree is located at the NW corner of the north lake's west bay, near the trail.  The bat house on the opposite side of the tree doesn't appear to be damaged. 8/18/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Sept 4, 2015: Wolf's August 2015 Wildlife Report



This male Stream Bluet (Enallagma exsulans) was found near Weir N (south wetland complex). 8/22/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)
Total Length = 31-37mm
Hindwing Length = 17-21mm
Flight Season = May - September

A total of 83 avian species (plus 1 sp.) was recorded this month at Ada Hayden Heritage Park, ranking this month as the 7th highest August among 18 years of records.
Many of the local breeders had left by the end of July or early August.  By the end of the month some of these same species were showing up again, most likely migrants from the north.
Based on citations in the 3rd Edition of “The Birds of Story County, Iowa,” by Stephen J. Dinsmore and Hank Zaletel (2001), plus my personal updates to the records, the male Gadwall on the 19th may represent a new extreme early Fall record for Story County (former record set on 4 September 1984 at Hendrickson Marsh).

Listed below, following the species’ names, are the date(s) of sighting(s), plus the occasional miscellaneous information regarding numbers, gender (♂=male, ♀=female), age (im=immature, ju=juvenile, abp=adult breeding plumage, ad=adult, anb=adult non-breeding), color phase (b=blue, w=white), and location (BY=back yard).  The order follows the 55th Supplement (2014) to the American Ornithologists’ Union Check-list of North American Birds and the 14th Supplement to the 7th Edition (1998).

AVIAN
     CANADA GOOSE: 1-18, 22-25, 27-31
     WOOD DUCK: 1 (28+), 2 (22+), 3 (28+), 4 (30+), 5 (17+), 6 (22+), 7-9, 10 (6), 11-14,
          16-31
     GADWALL: 19 (1♂)
     MALLARD: 1-30
     BLUE-WINGED TEAL: 6 (3), 20 (6), 25 (4), 27 (10), 28, 29 (4), 31 (4)
     RING-NECKED PH-EASANT: 1, 3, 5-7, 12-13, 17-18, 20, 23, 27-28, 30
     PIED-BILLED GREBE: 24-25 (2), 27 (1), 29 (1)
     DOUBLE-CRESTED CORMORANT: 1 (1), 2 (2), 4 (2), 5 (3), 6 (1), 8-10 (2), 11 (1), 12 (2),
          14 (2), 15 (1), 18 (2), 19-21 (1), 23 (1), 25 (1), 26 (3), 27 (2), 28-29 (1)
     GREAT BLUE HERON: 1 (4), 2 (5), 3 (8), 4 (3), 5 (8), 6 (3), 7-9 (4), 10 (1), 11 (7),
          12-13 (5), 14 (7), 15 (6), 16 (5), 17 (7), 18 (6), 19 (3), 20 (7), 21 (4), 22 (7), 23 (8),
          24 (5), 25-26 (4), 27 (7), 28 (2), 29 (3), 30 (2), 31 (4)
     GREEN HERON: 2 (2), 9 (1), 12 (1), 14 (1), 17 (3), 19-20 (1), 21 (2), 22-27 (1), 28-29 (2),
          31 (1)
     BLACK-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON: 11 (1), 14 (1), 17-22, 24-25, 30-31 (all 1st Summer)
     TURKEY VULTURE: 1 (1), 2 (3), 3 (2), 4 (1), 8 (1), 10 (3), 11 (1), 13-15 (1), 16 (6), 19 (2),
          20-21 (4), 23-24 (1), 25 (2), 27 (1), 30 (13), 31 (1)
     OSPREY: 12 (1), 19 (1), 22 (1), 23 (2), 24 (1), 30-31 (1)
     BALD EAGLE: 6 (1 ad), 8 (1 ad), 14 (2 ad), 18 (1 ad), 19 (1 im), 21-23 (1 ad), 28 (2 ad)
     COOPER’S HAWK: 8 (1), 14 (1), 17 (1)
     RED-TAILED HAWK: 2 (1), 5 (2), 6-7 (1), 14 (1), 15-17 (2), 19 (2), 20 (1), 23-24 (1),
          26-27 (1)
     KILLDEER: 1 (5), 2 (15), 3 (7), 4 (6), 5-6 (4), 7 (8), 8 (5), 9 (1), 12 (2), 14-15 (1), 16 (2),
          18 (5), 28 (3)
     SPOTTED SANDPIPER: 25 (1)
     SOLITARY SANDPIPER: 1 (3), 2 (2), 3-4 (1), 8 (1)
     WILLET: 17 (1)
     SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER: 2 (2), 3 (1)
     LEAST SANDPIPER: 1 (4)
     SHORT-BILLED DOWITCHER: 7 (1)
     RING-BILLED GULL: 7 (1), 19 (1), 23 (2)
     CASPIAN TERN: 14 (1), 17 (11), 18 (2)
     BLACK TERN: 17 (4)
     FORSTER’S TERN: 8 (1)
     EURASIAN COLLARED-DOVE: 1 (1), 19 (1), 29-30 (1)
     MOURNING DOVE: 1-9, 11-19, 22-24, 26-27. 29-31
     CHIMNEY SWIFT: 1, 7, 18, 20-23, 25, 27, 31
     RUBY-THROATED HUMMINGBIRD: 8 (1), 12 (1), 16 (1), 17 (2), 18 (1), 19 (3), 20 (1),
          25-26 (1), 29-30 (1)
     BELTED KINGFISHER: 2 (1), 4 (1), 6 (1), 9 (2), 10 (1), 11 (4), 12 (2), 13-15 (1), 16 (2),
          17-20 (1), 21-22 (2), 24-27 (1), 28 (3), 29 (2), 30-31 (1)
     RED-BELLIED WOODPECKER: 1, 5-6, 9, 14, 16-17, 27
     DOWNY WOODPECKER: 1, 4, 11, 14, 16-18, 20, 26, 29-30
     HAIRY WOODPECKER: 8, 13, 19, 29
     NORTHERN FLICKER (Yellow-shafted): 1 (1), 10 (1), 15-17 (1), 28-29 (1), 31 (1)
     OLIVE-SIDED FLYCATCHER: 27 (1), 29 (1)
     YELLOW-BELLIED FLYCATCHER: 19 (1)
     LEAST FLYCATCHER: 18 (1), 24 (1), 28 (1)
     Empidonax sp.: 18 (1), 23 (2), 24 (1), 26-27 (1), 29-30 (1)
     EASTERN PHOEBE: 23 (1), 25 (1), 27 (3), 29 (1)
     EASTERN KINGBIRD: 1 (2), 2 (1), 3 (3), 4-5 (1), 7 (1), 8-13 (2), 14 (4), 16 (2), 17 (3),
          18 (4), 19 (2), 20-21 (1), 23 (3), 24 (2), 25 (3), 27 (4), 28 (2), 29 (1), 30-31 (3)
     WARBLING VIREO: 2, 4, 18, 23-27, 30
     PHILADELPHIA VIREO: 19 (1), 26 (1), 29 (2)
     RED-EYED VIREO: 20 (1), 23 (1), 27 (1), 30 (1)
     BLUE JAY: 1-2, 4-5, 11-12, 16, 18-20, 28-30
     AMERICAN CROW: 3, 5, 9, 12, 14, 16, 18, 22, 28-31
     PURPLE MARTIN: 1-9, 10 (27+), 11-18, 20-23, 26-27, 28 (3), 29 (1), 31 (1)
     TREE SWALLOW: 1, 19, 22
     NORTHERN ROUGH-WINGED SWALLOW: 19, 31
     BANK SWALLOW: 7 (1), 21
     CLIFF SWALLOW: 1, 7, 9-10, 12, 18-21, 26-27, 29-30
     BARN SWALLOW: 1-30
     BLACK-CAPPED CHICKADEE: 1-2, 4-7, 9-10, 12, 14-16, 18-20, 22-23, 25-27, 29-30
     WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH: 1-2, 8, 12, 15-16, 26, 30
     HOUSE WREN: 1-12, 14, 16-20, 22-24, 28-30
     SEDGE WREN: 1 (2), 2 (3), 3 (1), 4 (3), 6 (2), 7 (4), 8 (1), 11-12 (1), 20 (1)
     EASTERN BLUEBIRD: 16 (3), 23 (1), 26 (2), 28 (2), 29, 30 (1)
     AMERICAN ROBIN: 1-11, 13-14, 16-18, 20, 22, 25-27, 29-31
     GRAY CATBIRD: 1, 3-9, 11, 13, 15, 17-22, 24, 26-31
     EUROPEAN STARLING: 16, 18, 20, 26-27, 29-30
     CEDAR WAXWING: 1 (7), 2 (4), 6 (6), 17 (1), 18 (2), 19 (3), 20 (1), 21 (2), 22 (1),
          25 (~20), 26 (1), 27 (2), 28 (1), 29 (~20), 30 (1)
     GOLDEN-WINGED WARBLER: 28 (1), 29-30 (2)
     BLACK-AND-WHITE WARBLER: 25 (1), 29 (1), 30 (2)
     NASHVILLE WARBLER: 13-14 (1)
     MOURNING WARBLER: 26 (1), 28 (1)
     COMMON YELLOWTHROAT: 1-16, 26-31
     AMERICAN REDSTART: 20 (1♀), 23 (1♀), 30 (1)
     CHESTNUT-SIDED WARBLER: 28-30 (1)
     WILSON’S WARBLER: 27 (1), 30 (1)
     CHIPPING SPARROW: 2, 27 (1)
     FIELD SPARROW: 1 (1), 10 (1)
     SONG SPARROW: 1-31
     NORTHERN CARDINAL: 1-20, 22-23, 25-30
     ROSE-BREASTED GROSBEAK: 5 (1♂), 18
     INDIGO BUNTING: 1-8, 11-12, 14-17, 29 (1)
     RED-WINGED BLACKBIRD: 1-23, 25-28, 31
     COMMON GRACKLE: 3
     BROWN-HEADED COWBIRD: 17, 19, 26
     ORCHARD ORIOLE: 1, 11 (1♂ + 1♀), 12, 15 (1♂), 18 (1♂), 20 (1♂)
     BALTIMORE ORIOLE: 3 (1), 4 (1♂), 8 (1), 18, 20, 26 (1♂)
     HOUSE FINCH: 1-2, 5, 7, 9, 11, 17-18, 23, 26. 31
     AMERICAN GOLDFINCH: 1-31
     HOUSE SPARROW: 1-23, 25-31

MAMMALIAN
     Bat sp: 1
     AMERICAN MINK: 27 (1), 31 (2)
     WHITE-TAILED DEER: 2 (1 fawn), 4 (1♀ w/1 fawn & 1 fawn), 18 (1), 19 (1+ 1 fawn), 22 (1)
     FOX SQUIRREL: 9, 16, 18-19, 22-24, 26-31
     EASTERN CHIPMUNK: 19, 29
     THIRTEEN-LINED GROUND SQUIRREL: 7, 17, 20
     EASTERN COTTONTAIL: 1-14, 16-20, 22-31

REPTILIAN
     PLAINS GARTER SNAKE: 5 (1)
     Garter Snake sp.: 22 (1)
     COMMON SNAPPING TURTLE: 21 (1)
     NORTHERN PAINTED TURTLE: 1-27, 29-31
     RED-EARED SLIDER: 7 (1), 11 (1), 16 (1)
     SPINY SOFTSHELL TURTLE: 28 (1)

AMPHIBIAN
     AMERICAN TOAD: 9, 11, 16-17, 22-23, 28
     BLANCHARD’S CRICKET FROG: 3, 16-17, 20, 24-27
     EASTERN GRAY TREE FROG: 8
     BOREAL CHORUS FROG: 31 (1)
     AMERICAN BULLFROG: 1-9, 11-22, 24, 26-27. 29-31
     NORTHERN LEOPARD FROG: 2-4, 7-11, 15, 19-23, 25, 30-31

LEPIDOPTERA
     BLACK SWALLOWTAIL: 1, 3-15, 17, 20-26, 29, 31
     EASTERN TIGER SWALLOWTAIL: 1-11, 13, 16, 27 (3)
     CABBAGE WHITE: 1-22, 24-27, 29-31
     ORANGE SULPHUR: 1-11, 13-17, 20-27, 29-31
     DAINTY YELLOW: 24
     Sulphur sp.: 1-3, 9, 11-12, 14-17, 20-22, 27, 30-31
     EASTERN TAILED BLUE: 1-2, 4, 7-8, 10-18, 20-22, 24-26, 28-31
     GREAT SPANGLED FRITILLARY:
     PEARL CRESCENT: 1, 3-17, 19-27, 30-31
     QUESTION MARK: 3, 7, 9, 16, 22
     anglewing sp.: 3-4
     MOURNING CLOAK: 2 (1), 11 (1)
     PAINTED LADY: 30 (1)
     RED ADMIRAL: 1, 4-8, 13, 15-17, 22, 29
     COMMON BUCKEYE: 1-3, 5-8, 11-13, 30
     RED-SPOTTED PURPLE: 3-4, 6, 8-9, 15
     VICEROY: 1, 3-14, 16, 18-22, 26-27, 29-31
     MONARCH: 1 (16), 2 (9), 3 (17), 4 (9), 5 (21), 6 (9), 7 (17), 8 (16), 9 (10), 10 (14), 11 (15),
          12 (14), 13 (11), 14 (16), 15 (11), 16 (13), 17 (7), 18 (1), 19 (3), 20 (13), 21-22 (7),
           23-24 (3), 25 (4), 26 (11), 27 (5), 28 (1), 29 (9), 30 (11), 31 (17)
     LEAST SKIPPER: 1-7, 9, 11, 14-16, 18-19, 21-24, 26
     FIERY SKIPPER: 24
     Skipper sp.: 8
     CHICKWEED GEOMETER: 28, 30
     CELERY LOOPER: 11

ODONATA
     GREAT SPREADWING: 9 (1), 24 (1)
     LYRE-TIPPED SPREADWING: 2-3
     BLUE-FRONTED DANCER: 1-7, 9-17, 20-22, 24-27, 30-31
     POWDERED DANCER: 17
     RAINBOW BLUET: 4
     DOUBLE-STRIPED BLUET: 6, 21, 24
     TULE BLUET: 13, 24
     FAMILIAR BLUET: 1-2, 4, 6-7, 9-12, 14-16, 20-21, 24-26, 31
     STREAM BLUET: 1, 6, 12, 22, 24, 26, 31
     ORANGE BLUET: 1, 6, 13, 27, 31
     Bluet sp.: 4, 20, 26, 31
     EASTERN FORKTAIL: 1-17, 19, 21, 24-27, 31
     COMMON GREEN DARNER: 1-17, 20-26, 29-31
     JADE CLUBTAIL: 10 (2), 12 (1)
     FLAG-TAILED SPINYLEG: 4 (2), 5 (1), 13 (1), 24 (1)
     PRINCE BASKETTAIL: 4, 6-8, 10, 16, 20
     HALLOWEEN PENNANT: 1, 3-4, 7-8, 14
     EASTERN PONDHAWK: 1-7, 10-15, 20, 23-24, 26
     WIDOW SKIMMER: 1-17, 20-26, 30-31
     COMMON WHITETAIL: 3-13, 16-17, 22-27, 30
     TWELVE-SPOTTED SKIMMER: 2-16, 21-22, 25, 31
     BLUE DASHER: 1-4, 6, 8, 11-12, 14-15, 20-21, 26
     WANDERING GLIDER: 8-9, 15-16, 18, 20-23, 25, 27
     EASTERN AMBERWING: 1-4, 6-7, 10-14, 21, 24-26, 31
     VARIEGATED MEADOWHAWK: 3-19, 22-24, 27, 29-30
     CHERRY-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 1-2, 4
     WHITE-FACED MEADOWHAWK: 3-4
     BAND-WINGED MEADOWHAWK: 3, 9, 12-13
     Meadowhawk sp.: 1, 3, 5, 10, 20-21
     BLACK SADDLEBAGS: 1-12, 14-16, 18, 20, 22-25, 31
     RED SADDLEBAGS: 6

ORTHOPTERA
     CAROLINA GRASSHOPPER: 2-31

Wolf. Oesterreich

Saturday, September 5, 2015

Sept 3, 2015: Sunset on the North Lake


The last evening of August 2015 ended with a wonderfully orange sunset over the North Lake. 8/31/15 (Kevin Kane)

Sept 2, 2015: Eastern Tiger Swallowtails


Eastern Tiger Swallowtails are quite common at the Park.  The female (at left) has blue on the hindwings.  The male (at right) is mostly yellow and black. 8/16/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)

Friday, September 4, 2015

Sept 1, 2015: Largemouth Bass


Alejandro Larios, a graduate student in Veterinary Pathology at ISU, was quite pleased with this 5.5-lb Largemouth Bass that he caught while fishing the south lake.  He soon released the fish back into the waters.  Coming from Anaheim, California, he is enjoying the "small-town" atmosphere of Ames and especially Ada Hayden Heritage Park. 8/29/15 (Wolf. Oesterreich)